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gearheaddad
Advanced Member

8631 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2005 :  10:08:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Todays subject is an old Mauser rifle that I'll do my best to describe. It's big and long!
In front of the bolt it's marked WAFFENFABRIK MAUSEROBERNDORF A/N 1900
There is a brass medallion screwed into the butt stock marked withnumbers and "Torpedam Overslag STR The serial number is O.G. 46678. All marked parts are also marked 678. There is a bayonet and sheath but with differant markings, On the Guard A D over I.5 No690, on the blade looks like"EJ an anchor A.B. 873. The gun and bayonet are in nice condition considering there age. Near the muzzle it's marked CAIST A VT
On the bottom of the barrel it's marked M-98 CAL. 6.5x55 SWEDEN. There is a cleaning rod screwed in under the barrel also however those numbers don't match. I'd say the gun is in about the same condition I see most military surplus rifles in, 60-70% conservativly. Any info approx. value?
Thanks again, Ed

Ed Konopasek

rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15665 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2005 :  10:46:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
From your description it seems that you have a Model 1896 Swedish Army Rifle. The initial production was by the Mauser factory in Germany, before the Swedes started producing them in Sweden.

These rifles are very popular with collectors and shooters, (extremely
accurate).

Sight unseen, per your description "60-70%", my wag is that it would be worth between $150 - $200.

There much information and web-sites devoted to these Swede Rifles on the net. Do a GOOGLE search you'll be surprised on the amount of information avaiable.

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OleDuk
Senior Member

USA
1255 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2005 :  11:38:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gearhead and rufe, that thing may be an M-98 mauser instead of the Swede M-96. It looks to be chambered for the Swedish 6.5 cartridge as evidenced by the barrel marking, but notice also it says M-98 ahead of that. The markings on the action indicate German manufacture in Oberndorf, Germany. I suspect it was used by one of those two countries by its Naval Service as evidenced by the anchor mark, and reference to "Torpedam...". The abbreviations do not appear to be German but I might be wrong. As a matter of fact, the barrel might have been installed by CAI( Century Arms Int'l. St Albans, VT.). If the Germans had done it it might haved been marked 6.5x55 Schweden or if the Swedes had done it, maybe 6.5x55 Sverige. Lots of the old Mausers are puzzles which are a lot of fun to try to solve!!
Cheers,
OleDuk

"Disperse you Rebels; Damn you,throw down your arms and disperse!"
British Major John Pitcairn, April 19, 1775. He fell at Bunker Hill two months later.
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rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15665 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2005 :  12:12:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OleDuk

"It looks to be chambered for the Swedish 6.5 cartridge as evidenced by the barrel marking, but notice also it says M-98 ahead of that."

"I suspect it was used by one of those two countries by its Naval Service as evidenced by the anchor mark, and reference to "Torpedam..."."


Cheers,
OleDuk







I believe the marking on the barrel "M-98" was an error on the part of the idiots who work for Century. I doubt if they know/care the difference between a M-96 & a M-98.

The brass Disc on the stock doesn't refer to Naval use. It concerns the amount of wear on the rifleing and the use of light "spitzer" bullets rather the the original "round-nose" bullets the rifle was zeroed for.

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allen griggs
Advanced Member

USA
26644 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2005 :  05:31:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is a Swedish Mauser, M96. The importer did make a mistake by calling it a M98. The stock disc is the giveaway that this is a Swedish Mauser. Also the serial number OG 46678. "OG" are the initials of a Swedish Government inspector named Olaf Gustavson, I also have a Swedish Mauser that he inspected. In 1900 there were 4 Swedish inspectors and they initialled every gun.
These are great rifles and very accurate. rufe-snow gave a good price estimate, you do see them as high as $250.
They seem to be worth lots more than that when you realize what high quality rifles they are.
The bayonet it worth $25.
The import marks are CAI ST A VT which stands for Century Arms International St Albans Vermont. This is the company that imported the rifle.

ps Look at those import marks with a magnifying glass. See if it actually says "M96" not "M98".

Edited by - allen griggs on 03/09/2005 06:23:53 AM
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nononsense
Moderator

8929 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2005 :  08:58:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
gearheaddad,

This is an explanation of the brass disc:

One last point about the m/96 stock. There is a brass disc about 30mm in diameter inletted into the right side of the buttstock. There are actually three disc variations, an early 2-screw disc, a later 2-screw disc, and a 1-screw disc. My rifle has the one screw type disc, and the information that follows pertains only to the one screw disc. For information about the two screw discs, or additional details about the one screw disc and lots of other information about Swedish weapons, see Mats' Weapons Page online. That is where I learned how to decipher the disc on my rifle.

The one screw disc is divided into 3 sections, each of which is marked in such a way as to reveal some information about that particular rifle. The smallest "slice" of the brass disc bears the numbers 1, 2, and 3 with a triangular punch mark over one of the numbers. This indicates the condition of the bore. No punch mark is perfect. 1 means a very few dark areas in the corners of the lands and grooves. 2 indicates rust in the corners of the lands and grooves and possible light rust in the grooves. 3 indicates spots of light rust throughout the grooves, but no sharp edges; this is still acceptable. A rifle scoring lower than 3 was rebarreled. My rifle is a 3, but any rifle passed by the Swedish armorers will shoot very well, as the inspectors were quite picky. The bore of my rifle looks good to the naked eye.

The next slice of the little brass disc indicates the elevation aiming error when shooting the standard m/41 Swedish service load, which used a 140 grain boat-tail spitzer bullet at a MV of around 800 m/s. There are three Swedish words in this sector of the disc. "Torped" indicates the 140 grain BT spitzer bullet (there was an earlier 156 grain RN bullet), "Overslag" means over, followed by a space and then "Str." Str is the abbreviation for streck, a unit of angle, and there are 6300 streck to a circle. Streck were used in a manner similar to the way North American shooters use minutes of angle. If there is a number in the blank space between Overslag and Str. it indicates the amount the rifle shoots over in terms of streck. 1 streck equals approximately 1/10 meter at 100 meters. So a 1 in the space on the disc indicates that rifle would shoot 10 cm (or a little less than 4") above the point of aim at 100 meters. The space is blank on my rifle's disc, indicating that it shoots to point of aim.

The largest slice of the disc has an outer and an inner arc of numbers. The outer arc bears numbers "6.51" followed by the numbers 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 (my rifle has a punch mark over the "2"). The inner arc bears the numbers "6.46" followed by 7,8,9,0 (no punch mark over a number in the inner arc on my rifle). It is my understanding that these numbers reveal the nominal bore (6.46mm) and groove (6.51mm) diameters of a new barrel. The punch mark(s) reveals the actual diameter of the particular barrel (and thus, presumably, any wear). Thus, my barrel has a groove diameter of 6.52mm. Apparently the bore diameter of my barrel measured right at 6.46mm.

If the groove diameter measures between 6.51mm and 6.53mm all was well. If the groove diameter measured 6.54mm-6.55mm the rifle was used only for training. If the groove diameter exceeded 6.56mm the rifle was rebarreled. The Swedes are very meticulous people!

http://www.chuckhawks.com/swedish_mauser.htm


The A/N or a/N refers to the Neckar River where the Oberndorf factory was located.

These are terrific rifles, very high quality and are known for their accuracy.

Best.

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OleDuk
Senior Member

USA
1255 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2005 :  5:25:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great info allen and nononsense! You guys really pinned it down.
Cheers,
OleDuk

"Disperse you Rebels; Damn you,throw down your arms and disperse!"
British Major John Pitcairn, April 19, 1775. He fell at Bunker Hill two months later.
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gearheaddad
Advanced Member

8631 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2005 :  9:16:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
WEll thank-you guys. I really appreciate all the shared knowledge. What a great sight.
Thanks again, Ed

Ed Konopasek
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