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 H&R--Belgium Made??
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Ballistic
Junior Member

140 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  07:08:26 AM  Show Profile
A neighbor of mine has a H&R .243 Mauser bolt action stamped made in elgium and has the an Insingia with BOFORS on top of bbl in front of action. Slight Schanbel foreend, sheek rest a real beauty. I can't find this gun in the Gun digest i have. Does anyone of you have any info in it---can't remember the whole SN but it was a five digit starting with the number 5.

cowboy77845
Junior Member

USA
228 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  09:21:15 AM  Show Profile
H&R made some bolt actions during the late '60s and early '70s with FN actions called the 300 (rifle) and 301 (carbine) ULtra. My information says they had Douglas BBls and Fajen made stocks but the earlier ones may have had bbls from some other manufacturer made from Bofors steel. BB says 495 for one in 100% condition. Hope this helps some. You would have to look in an earlier "Gun Digest" to find info.
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Ballistic
Junior Member

140 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  3:05:23 PM  Show Profile
Thanks for the info Cowboy, it shend some light on the subject. I tell you it's a beautiful piece of work.
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perry shooter
Advanced Member

13691 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  4:16:46 PM  Show Profile
Hello I think the SAKO vixen and forester had barrels marked BOFORS steel
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cowboy77845
Junior Member

USA
228 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  8:17:05 PM  Show Profile
Do you think FN may have used Sako bbls? I have 2 Ultra carbines and they are Douglas bbls as best I can tell: they have FN actions and that is why I have them. The 25-06 is really neat.
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perry shooter
Advanced Member

13691 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2005 :  9:27:00 PM  Show Profile
Hello 1975 listing gun digest "H&R 300 bolt action 22-250,243,270,308,30-06(5shot) 7mm mag 300 win mag (3shot) SAKO action" 22 " barrel ?????
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cowboy77845
Junior Member

USA
228 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2005 :  12:27:42 AM  Show Profile
"Guns and Ammo Annual" for 1975 and 76 says the same thing. Sako and Bofors go together for sure. "Bolt Action Rifles, 4th ed" in the FN mauser section says Sako made rifles using FN actions but not when. Either action is good. I would have thought with a Bofors bbl, the action would be Sako. Guess I learned something.
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Ballistic
Junior Member

140 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2005 :  07:10:14 AM  Show Profile
Thanks again for all the input men. The gun I held in my hands was stamped Made in Belgium and it definately had a Mauser action.
Can anyone put a ball-park $$ worth on this gun?
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cowboy77845
Junior Member

USA
228 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2005 :  09:22:18 AM  Show Profile
This is a guess. My thought is that it would be worth about what all the other commercial Mauser action based guns are. The Blue Book says top dollar is 495 for 100% condition. Does it say 300 Ultra on it anywhere? There should be more info on the bbl if it is like mine. You give no information on condition. The range is probably anywhere from 250 to 450. Some items go for more in some sections of the country than others. The 243 is very popular here as a whitetail gun. Someone is always looking for a kid's gun for a starter. If you wish to sell you would probably get more putting it on GB than on consignment in a local shop.
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nononsense
Moderator

8934 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2005 :  10:34:09 AM  Show Profile
Ballistic,

You have to do some tracking to follow all of the twisting and turning that goes on with projects like this. The components have to be broken down first and a time line added so that the variations can be accounted for.

"AB Bofors acquired its name in 1873, but this company was the culmination of a long history of steel manufacturing by a small creek called Bofors, near the town of Karlskoga, beginning in the 17th Century. In 1883 the company decided to begin arms manufacturing. There was a considerable expansion of this activity in the First World War (despite Sweden's neutrality) and in the 1920s Bofors co-operated with Krupps of Germany, which was restricted in its own armament developments by the Treaty of Versailles. There is some dispute over the extent of the influence of Krupps on Bofors designs, but during this time Bofors developed a range of large-calibre guns, starting with a 75mm AA gun and including many other non-automatic weapons for army and naval use."

http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk/Bofors.htm

So, in this stream of products, Bofors made barrels for firearms as a supplier to several firearms and armament manufacturers.

Mauser (Oberndorf of Germany) had close ties with Belgium from the start of manufacturing, supplying them with the first standard military bolt action rifle in the form of the Model 1889. Mauser, at the time, owned by Ludwig Loewe & Co. of Berlin, also had a controlling interest in Fabrique Nationale d’Armes de Guerre (National Manufactory of Weapons of War; FN) in Belgium. FN is a private consortium that was established to manufacture the Model 1889 under license from Mauser (Loewe). After WWI, FN won its independence from Mauser and continued to manufacture Mauser receivers and rifles even to the point of supplying some to the Germans themselves. FN also supplied the distributor Stoeger with barreled actions to make these available to the American gunsmithing market. The German occupation of Belgium during WW2 brought an end to this, though.

In 1947, FN was supplying many of the world’s manufacturers with the original style Mauser receiver as well as barreled actions. Sako was one of these that used the original design with the internal ring cut only on one side (“c”-ring) and the thumbcut on the left side of the receiver. In 1948, FN had re-designed the Mauser with a solid left side and the internal ring was cut on both sides (“D” ring). The bolt handle was also lowered in a conformation that favored scope mounting.

Sako utilized this new model Mauser (termed the “commercial”) until 1949 when they finished the design of their first receiver, the L-46. Sako was then able to supply actions and barreled receivers (barrels by Bofors) to many of the firearms manufacturers as well as those in the gunsmithing trade.

Harrington & Richardson didn’t manufacture these firearms, they merely contracted for the assembly of the parts and then sold the finished firearms under the name H & R. They used the stocks from Fajen and the barreled receivers from Sako, both versions of the Mausers and then the new model L-46 short action. Later, Sako came out with the longer version receivers marked L-57 and L-61. These fell under the 300 series of H&R rifles using the nomenclature “Ultra”, I think. Then in 1968, H&R bought O’Brien Rifle Company of Las Vegas (Vern O’Brien) and incorporated his wildcat .17 caliber designs from the late ‘40’s into their line-up. This resulted in the name “Ultra Wildcats”.

That’s the best that I can do for right now.


Edited by - nononsense on 06/28/2005 10:35:50 AM
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joel_black
Member

USA
681 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2005 :  10:49:02 AM  Show Profile
I am surprised H&R bought the barrels. Until H&R was reorganized, it was a major subcontactor for many other US makers.
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