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 COLT 1908 Pocket Disassembly help needed
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The Sandman
Junior Member

USA
112 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2002 :  3:17:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HI - I aquired a 1908 COLT 380 pocket Pistol, this is a type II that does not have a barrel bushing, can someone tell me how the slide is removed or how it is disassembled so I can clean and oil it? The serial #697XX shows it to be made between 1906 and 1926, it has pearl handles but with no logo could they be original? Much of the blueing is worn off the slide (80%) and from the frame (60%) would I lose very much of its value having it redone? THANK YOU for any help you can provide. Darrell "The Sandman" Sanderson Please reply here or dlscas@earthlink.net THANKS AGAIN

Tailgunner1954
Advanced Member

7201 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2002 :  4:14:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Remove magazine, check chamber and cock the pistol. Now with your right hand, put your trigger finger into the trigger guard and your thumb onto the end of the slide. push the slide back until the mark and arrow on the slide line up with the frame. With your left hand twist the barrel CCW to unlatch the locking lug. Pull the slide, barrel spring etc off the receiver

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Some guys like a mag full of lead, I still prefer one round to the head.
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royc38
Senior Member

USA
2372 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2002 :  4:18:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hold the pistol in your left hand and looking at you should see a mark on the slide under the end of the barrel. Put your right hand thumb inside the trigger guard and pointer finger on the slide and pinch it until the mark on the slide is even with the frame. As you are doing this twist the barrel counterclock wise. when the barrel turns the slide will then come off. Its kinda slick. The barrel sits in the grooves that you will see when it comes apart. That John Browning was indeed a genius. Hope this helps. If you get stuck write back I will watch for you.
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The Sandman
Junior Member

USA
112 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2002 :  5:13:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HEY THANKS GUYS - Worked like I knew what I was doing, everything inside clean and crisp, is there a market for a piece like this? THANKS TO BOTH OF YOU AGAIN - Tha Sandman
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royc38
Senior Member

USA
2372 Posts

Posted - 05/13/2002 :  11:15:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have one that has a 4 digit serial number. According to a Colt collector, mine was made somewhere between the last six months of 1911 and the first six months of 1912. I originally bought it for a carry gun but after I found out how old it was I retired it to the gun safe. The .380 is more desireable than the 32 auto. I have since bought a Colt Pocketlite .380 and a Beretta 84F so my .380 class is complete. If I were you I would just carry that. They are a great gun and the trigger pull is nice. Good luck and congratulations on your purchase.
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JudgeColt
Senior Member

2381 Posts

Posted - 05/14/2002 :  12:09:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
DO NOT REFINISH THAT PISTOL! Refinishing a worn but desirable $300 gun at a cost of $100 or so will result in a $200 gun. It will also destroy the historical value of the pistol. It deserves to be kept original. If you want one that looks new, one that looked new and had its box and papers sold on the auction site recently for around $1000, maybe more.

Colt called them stocks, many call them grips, but no one should call them handles. Doors have handles, guns do not, unless they are carrying handles like on military-style rifles, etc..

Model M Colts are fairly collectable, with the .380 generally being more valuable than a similar .32, largely because there were only about 1/3 as many made. There is a chance the stocks are factory, but unlikely without medallions. However, some pearl and ivory stocks were made without the medallions. If you remove the stocks, look for the serial number scratched or written on the inside of the stocks. The inside should appear sawed. If the stocks are factory and original to this gun, they will add a lot to the value. Only a factory letter will verify. If a serial number is on the stocks, they may be factory, and that would make the $100 letter worthwhile.

Let us know.
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Jgreen
Advanced Member

2533 Posts

Posted - 05/14/2002 :  12:40:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have a .32 pocket hammerless, and it is a fantastic gun. Very Accurate, feeds well with Winchester silver tips, and, frankly, I like it more than my Walther PPK/S .32

Check out www.coltautos.com.



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