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 P. Webley & Son Shotgun
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Edward Bearce
Starting Member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 10/07/2006 :  11:55:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You were all so good about helping me identify
the Bob Dudley shotgun. Maybe you would help
with this one also.
My wife's father left it to her and she asked me to try.
Its a 12 ga.(I think) no ga. markings double barrel shotgun
It has a bar between the barrels with these markings
P. Webley & Son St. James's London. and what looks like a
shotgun shell with wings in gold and the letters W & S
on the lower stock tang 7097 It has outside hammers
on the underside of right barrel no.13 left barrel no.23
on the reciever under barrels is a crossed spears with a crown
above. and also a crown with the letters R P and this is in gold
also on the underside of stock a gold oblong inlay.
Thanks for any help. Edward

Old Fool
Senior Member

USA
1837 Posts

Posted - 10/07/2006 :  12:47:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
P. Webley & Son, St James's London manufactured the famous seris of British Bulldog revolvers, and the revolvers used by British troops in both WWI and WWII. They are still in buisness, and their hame page is http://www.webley.co.uk They generally furnished shotguns "in the white" to numerous other firms that finished them. I suspect that you have one of these guns. I would have it appraised by an expert, Jim Supica at the Old Town Station comes to mind.

I am sure that some of the other folks around here will have far more information for you.

Good Luck



He who governs least governs best.

NRA Distinguished Member
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He Dog
Advanced Member

Australia
37398 Posts

Posted - 10/07/2006 :  5:06:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep, this one is good news. Webly, Birmingham was founded by brothers James and Philip Webley as percussion and gun lock makers. In the 1838 the partnership was dissolved and Philip married the daugher of William Davis, who had died in 1831. His widow carried had carried on his business and in 1845 it was bought by Philip and by 1853 Webleys were making percussion revolvers and in the 1860's the firm was registered in the name of "P. Webley & Son" of Birmingham and London. It is not known when they made their first shotgun, but Philip's eldest son Thomas William obtained a provisional patent in 1865 which would allow a pinfire gun to fire centerfire cartridges. By 1873 Webley had a considerable business in the manufacture of rifles and shotguns. In October 1897 (this is were it starts getting sexy) Webley merged with the Birmingham firm of W. & C. Scott and Son to form Webley and Scott Revolver and Arms Company Limited. Prior to the merger, Webley guns were sold bearing no name, but the BEST QUALITY GUNS were signed "P. Webley & Son, St. James London." After the opening of the Shaftesbury Avenue showroom in 1893, the best Webley guns will be found bearing this Address. (This pretty clearly dates your wifes shotgun to 1893-1897. In 1906 the name of the Company was shortened to Webley & Scott Ltd.

12 gauge is probably correct, but very likely the chambers are shorter than the modern 2.75" and will not accept current shot shells. I gather the older lengths can be found. Value certainly will depend greatly upon condition, but his one needs a hands on appraisal from someone knowldegeable in 19th Century British shotguns. My WAG is that in good condition value will go $1200+.

The average response time for a 911 call is 23 minutes; the response time of a .357 is 1400 feet per second.

Edited by - He Dog on 10/07/2006 5:09:48 PM
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joel_black
Member

USA
681 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2006 :  3:30:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The "St James" address was puffery on Webley's part. It was used early in the cartridge era to make it appear that they had a presence in London, which they did not at that time. They never had a store on St James St.
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Edward Bearce
Starting Member

USA
6 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2006 :  9:44:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks He Dog,Old Fool and joel black
for your quick response to my post
about my wife's Webley shotgun.
till next time. Edward
(now I'll look around and see if
I can help someone)

Edited by - Edward Bearce on 10/09/2006 9:47:18 PM
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He Dog
Advanced Member

Australia
37398 Posts

Posted - 10/10/2006 :  8:21:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Edward that is why we hang out here, and we would be pleased to have you pull up a log and sit a spell.

The average response time for a 911 call is 23 minutes; the response time of a .357 is 1400 feet per second.
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joeaf1911a1
Advanced Member

3029 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2006 :  6:16:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, I also have a old double P. Webley and son hammer gun but in 10 bore. Both barrels were badly dented and being Damascus I didnt want to try to get out the bad dents so I cut it down to its undented length and got a bit over 18 inch barels. Also came into a few boxes of 10 ga.
Alcan all brass shells. These had to be cut back to 2 1/2 inches to chamber. Only load I use is 3 drams FFG black powder with 1 1/4 oz. of
buckshot. Kinda a backup "house gun" for "varmits". I realize that cutting off the barrels destoyed its value. Did a bit of machining on a old Lee "load all?" crimp die for a slight crimp on the over the powder wad. One damn heaavy piece of iron though.
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