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 US Military Veteran Forum - Vietnam
 "A" Co, 4th INF, 12th BTLN,.. 199th Light Inf Bgde
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BigBarn
Junior Member

USA
276 Posts

Posted - 01/29/2008 :  10:11:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Burning bodies, piled up as high as the buildings in down town Pleiku, Tet, 1968. I can still smell the burning flesh from that pile. Seeing the bodies of all the children in the orphanage, hacked to pieces by the VC, when we cornered them in Pleiku. The faces of the guys at Dak To, when we flew in 155 howitzer shells, and as much ammo as we could carry, they thought they were dead. Met one of those guys this summer on a trip to DC, and he hugged me for twenty minutes, thanking me for being there. An out of body experience!
The little children that surrounded you when you stopped for what ever reason, while hauling 155 shells on convoy, they just seemed to come out of the wood work, always hungry, and we would give them whatever we had to give, usually our precious cans of ham-n-limas! Couldn't eat that bababooey anyway! Running down the runway at Cahm (sp) Rahn Bay, trying to catch our huey lift off to go home, while it was taking mortor rounds from Charlie. I guess he didn't want us to go home! Thank God we made it!
Being spit on by people that I had gone to high school with, for being a baby killer. At that time, it almost became true!

"Respect the land, and it will respect you"
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tequacha
Starting Member

USA
20 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2008 :  4:11:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What I remember? Couple months ago, I met a recent basic training graduate, he asked me when I was in Nam? I told him him a couple nights ago. He looked puzzled. I told him if he is unfortunate enough to go war, some day he would understand.
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roboat
Starting Member

11 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2008 :  4:19:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Prangle, I flew for you guys in the 199th while you were there. In fact, in the 5th picture, note the Greyhound on the door panel. Greyhounds, 240th Assault, our gunships were the maddogs. I was a slick driver for the Greyhounds from July 67 - June 68.

If you ever saw a Warrant Officer pilot trying to eat beans and weenies and play air guitar while flying, that was prolly me!

Sorry about those rough landings, and almost clipping you with the tail-rotor.

Sorry about making that 10-ship CA with only six guys, since lead ship was the only one with grunts aboard. (Man y'all's LT was PO'ed!) Some of those pics look like Dong Tam/My Tho. Was that in your AO? Bad neighborhood!

Welcome home.

Some of these stories are absolutely bone-chilling.


quote:
Originally posted by prangle

Found some picture! early 1968 199th Light Infantry





http://myspace.com/eatorlando
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roboat
Starting Member

11 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2008 :  4:22:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tequacha

What I remember? Couple months ago, I met a recent basic training graduate, he asked me when I was in Nam? I told him him a couple nights ago. He looked puzzled. I told him if he is unfortunate enough to go war, some day he would understand.


Welcome home, my brother. Rest easy.
PTSD sucks.

http://myspace.com/eatorlando
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dg13
Starting Member

14 Posts

Posted - 05/11/2008 :  4:36:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was an advisor to the RF, PF and PSDF in SVN. Smells--I loved the smell of gunpowder smoke, I hated the smell of a garbage dump south of Cholon that I had to go through to get home. I ate with the Vietnamese, fought along side them, slept with them, trained them and went on patrol with them. They were human beings and were happy to have an American by their side -- day and night! I was part of CORDS and this program wiped the VC from the countryside. The same concept is now being used in the middle east by Gen Patraus. Counter insurgency at its best! I am proud to say that I helped "win their hearts and minds"!

Congress lost the Viet Nam War for us and indirectly killed a lot of my VN friends over there.... What a world we live in. Bitter? Naw!


dg13

Edited by - dg13 on 05/11/2008 4:38:17 PM
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jackd
Starting Member

12 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2008 :  7:31:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi there , i'm new.
What do i remember most? well lots of things i haven't talked about in 36 years but what stands out the most / coming home and sitting in a classroom taking a placement test for 6 hrs at international paper only to be told at the end all nam vets could go home we don't hire nam vets. that was the longest 40 feet i ever walked.leaveing.
I learned real quick to not talk about it.
This is my son's idea to join a group and maby loose some anger.
other than that the damn scream of the transmission at my back.
copters was my game , D and H models.
70-72
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divecop
Member

USA
740 Posts

Posted - 05/25/2008 :  9:49:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
...The bugs, the smell, the rain,the mud, nothing dry everything always wet.The C-rats and K-rats. The oldest one I remember was 1939, most were from the 40's and 50's. The heat, Mamasan's cooking, Papasan's always smiling while working on the base and then lobing mortars in at night. The smell of death. The fear always there in the back of your throat. Doing what has to be done to get home in one piece. The huey's with the mini-guns strafing the side of the mountain every night to keep the VC from setting up mortars and rockets. The 81mm mortars(ours), the gunfire. Then coming home to the protesters. Not being the same person you were when you left. And there are the nights when your demons come to visit you in your sleep. Yeah I remember this and alot more. Wish I could forget.

What doesn't kill me only makes me stronger

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footlong
Advanced Member

7785 Posts

Posted - 08/24/2008 :  11:17:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Went to China in 2001. I was so scared I did not pee or poop for 2
days. But why? We were coming to HELP people. To SAVE them. We were
on a mission. Sound familiar? Make a long story short. We REALLY DID
HELP. Lot different from 30+years before. Best PART was that trip
Home. Thank you GOD for jet streams
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lnu238
Starting Member

48 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  4:49:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello all,

Forgive me for jacking your post for a minute or two.

I have wanted to post and say thank you to each and every one of you for a while now but thank you just does not cover what I want to say. Truth is, I don't know/have the words to express how i feel about each and every one of you for what you have done for my family and our country.

As I read your experiences it truly breaks my heart.

I have never served, however my wife is Active Army and has been deployed to Iraq twice, Korea once and looks like Afghanistan is coming around the corner.

Anyway, I just wanted you all to know, for what it's worth you have all our respect, our thanks and we hope you can forgive the American people for there ignorance. God bless you all.

Levi & Capt C. Nation 53rd Med Bat.
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charliesbunker
Starting Member

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 09/13/2008 :  2:39:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reading this forum brings back many thoughts,heat,humidity,never-ending rain,replacement depot,truck ride to assined unit,another replacement unit in the unit for in-country trainning,tower guard,first incomming,joining recon(very stupid),PBR's,ambush,being ambushed,crying,fear,heat-stroke,following blood-trails,nite-ambush,OP,LP,f4's,napalm,500 pounders,wounded,dead,crying,patrols,red ants,setting up nite ambush in ant nest, moving ambush in the dark,resuply,mail from home,c-rats unfit to eat but you eat them anyway,carrying so much waight the straps on the ruck left scares I still have to this day,seeing my best friend die,seeing my new best fiend die,DROS,home,leave and nobody cares,new assinement,FT. CARSON,being spit on by a bunch of hippies,deciding I would rather be shot by NVA than spit on here,second tour,more of the same.I survived and I don't know why.

2nd/28th Inf. Recon. BLACK LIONS

charlie

Edited by - charliesbunker on 09/13/2008 2:41:58 PM
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fatwilly
Starting Member

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2008 :  10:31:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm the son of a son of a sailor and grew up in the P.I, NAS Sangley Point, Subic, etc. I was ready for the heat, humidity and the nasty smell but the memory of dead Marines in body bags is still there. I finished my enlistment at NAS pensacola/NCTC Corry Field and our wards were full of RVN causualties.Corpsman were in short supply in '68.
quote:
Originally posted by givette

The smell. Upon our arrival the stewardess opens the door on the plane,...dunno how to put it..."sweet, poopty odor" permeating the entire country. Body bags. I could always sense the body bags' presence. Again, the smell. The flies hovering. Why were body bags always laid out in the sun? Breaking whiskey bottles so we could scatter the broken glass underneath the concertina wire. (I don't think the gooks liked that too much) Feeding the dogs leftovers. Someone learned that if you rolled the meat in hot sauce, then sprinkled it with .50 cal. gunpowder, it would keep the dogs mean, and the chemicals in the gunpowder would make their brains unstable. We alwaystook heed when they started growling. I firmly believe the dogs saved my life. Body count. The body count is important to someone, I guess. And don't forget to count the blood trails too. Fukk-U lizards. Now they were a class act. (At least they told you outright how they felt about the "round-eye"). VN's (friendlies)..seems the closer to the boonies we got, the less they were trusted. For the life of me, I can't figure out why. Yeah, right. Washington. When asked what her husband found most troublesome about the war (Vietnam) Lady Bird said it was the constant rat-a-tat-tat. What a joke. Ever notice the youth of our country go through the same assinine routine again and again, approximately every 25yrs. or so??

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fragments
Junior Member

395 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2008 :  06:16:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ahhhh the memories. If you ride a motorcycle and are interested in joining a good group of Combat Vets check out combatvet.org. It's not an "MC" but an association. We don't sit around talking about things that happened or the way it was, we live for today and enjoy the brotherhood that binds us all together. Check 'em out there's probably a chapter in your area.
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OMMEGA
Starting Member

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2008 :  11:05:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dear fellow gunnut you have made my day! You have just reminded me why vets don't wanna talk about their life in hell. That was damn funny I thought I;d poop my pants! Now I can go to sleep knowing that we all will rest well tonight because our guys on the front are keeping the bad guys at bay. Thanks again for the memories!

quote:
Originally posted by gunnut505

Picking your head out of that nasty red dust to view the treeline with no leaves, wondering who made Ham'n'limas the most often canned substitute for food, blowing smoke at someone through yer gun barrel, stories of the legendary white/black team of deserters, "It ain't no thing", spider holes right next to your OP, Ba Muy Ba (Formaldehyde in a can), rain without lightning, mud without rain, sleeping for 10 minutes and thinking it was an hour, aftermath of flechettes, impact noises just over your head while leaves and branches rain down, betting how high Charlie would fly on the next blooper, body counts, finding gooks with playing cards on/in them, heat worse than St Louis in August, wondering how things were going in The World, medevac and Lisa at Da Nang.

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Jim Rau
Advanced Member

USA
4275 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2008 :  11:08:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by prangle

Found some pictures! early 1968 199th Light Infantry










Was that second picture taken at a CA out of Black Horse?
I was a 'Redcatcher' 68-69. 87th Engineer Co. (CBT).
Were you there when they hit the POL dump right behind our Co area??
I to remember the 3rd Ord Ammo Dump going up. It lasted for several days!!!
I found an efficient way to 'burn fooey'. While out at Black Horse we had a Arty Battery next to us. As you cannon cocker can verify, when the powder canister is open it is considered contaminated and any unused power bags are latter burned. Well I would get the 'contaminated' bags from the arty next door and we would use them to burn the crap. About two or three bags and you could eat out of the barrel. But some AH butter bar thought it was 'unsafe' and made us stop doing it.
By the way, my second tour I was the one in the left door (crew chief) of those Hueys!! 282nd AHC (Black Cats) and 71st AHC (Rattlers)!
What unit were you with in the 199th?
Those pictures sure bring back some memories! Thanks for posting them!

Self defence is an absolute and natural right. An armed society is not always polite, but it is A FREE AND SAFE SOCIETY! Keep your head down and your powder dry! J. Rau, Alabama

Edited by - Jim Rau on 12/19/2008 11:17:16 AM
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Jim Rau
Advanced Member

USA
4275 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2008 :  5:47:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MMOMEQ-55

One thing that sticks in my mind was the time my spotter and myself were being extracted from a hot LZ. For some reason an Army huey was there to pick us up. (we were Marines) The bush was full of gooks and this a##hole pilot leaves us there. We were less than 10 yards from that chopper. He was sh#tting in his pants from taking on fire and left us standing there. Worst feeling in the world when you are about to be over run by a 50/60 gooks.
I took one in my knee then one in my head. My spotter drops everything and throws me over his shoulder and runs many clicks with me. We finally get to lay low for a few hours,long enough for charlie to give up on us. To this day I still don't know the pilots name but if I ever did found out I would track him down and gut the coward like he deserves.

I don't judge the whole Army on one bad apple. And I don't want to offend anyone. We all served no matter what branch you were in. So pease don't take offense. I post this in hopes that someone might know something about this pilot and can steer me to him. And if you are the pilot who ran out on us, please feel free to contack me. We need to talk.


You don't offend me. We never did that, but I have heard stories like yours before. We even waited in a hot lz to get ARNs out.
I can tell you one about a Marine who's life we saved. He got hit with a kettle claymore and 'some one' came up on guard and ask if anyone in the area could do an emergency Dust Off and we volunteered. When we landed and were about to load this guy a Lt. came up and told us to wait, he didn't want one of his Marines dying on a Army bird, he would wait for a Marine bird. (They were about 15 out). I told my AC about this and told him I was going to kick this guys ass rather than leave this guy to die. He said 'do what you have to do'. So I took the 60 operating rod I kept in my smoke pole and coal cocked the AH Lt and we took the Marine and he lived. Never heard a thing about it again. I am betting when this AH Lt came to and want to raise hell his CO told him to pound sand!!!

Self defence is an absolute and natural right. An armed society is not always polite, but it is A FREE AND SAFE SOCIETY! Keep your head down and your powder dry! J. Rau, Alabama

Edited by - Jim Rau on 12/19/2008 5:49:16 PM
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joker19
Junior Member

USA
101 Posts

Posted - 03/15/2009 :  5:00:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I flew a Flachett loaded UH-1C Gunship (I Corp) on many sniffer missions. Killed a load of VC and NVA but also a ton of monkeys. Flew into the Tennis Court/Ah Shau/Rock Pile/Vadergriff/Ripcord on many missions but the worst of all was Lam Sahn 719 into Laos. Flew for the Alleycats out of DaNang and the Jokers out of Dong Ha and Khe Sahn.
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sarge22853
Starting Member

USA
12 Posts

Posted - 03/18/2009 :  10:06:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Damn, was I ever that young? Semper Fi
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garold280
Starting Member

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2009 :  01:43:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by overo88

Goofy grape koolaid, Tiger piss beer,johnny Walker Red, eating fried frogs and rice with the locals, mother with newborn with nipples cut off by the VC, burning hootches and waiting for secondary explosions or hidden rounds cooking off, smell of burning rice cashes, seeing bullets hiting the rice paddy water in front of me and not seeing the shooter. boot lace 6-8 inch long leaches. little black leaches swolen with your blood. shootout with VC in a MG bunker made with portland cement bags "made in the USA". finding ammo and supply cashes with better (new) 782 gear better then what I had. first kill and a squad leader that froze up i had to push (rifle butt to the head)out of the way or die. (got two on the trail who were cooking rice)only three days in country on Deck House I. India Company comming back with 30 some odd marines out of 200, the rest whent home in bags. hill 69 overrun just outside of Chu-Lie. just 17 of us walked down the next morning. burning C-4 to heat the C-rats, burning heat tabs under my poncho to stay warm, in the rain. ARVN's that stand up to take a piss while on ambush. ARVN officers shooting our captured VC's. VC'c who got flying lessons. NVA Regulars that stand and fight for days. The underground bunker I found, with AID room, sleeping mats, ammo & weapons. enough for a hundred or more men not more then 2 clicks from Chu-Lie. TAM-KY, Den fu, marble, R&R in Hong Kong, ROK's that were assume fighters, ChickenSH** PF's and ARVN's. Papa san stealing grenades from our bunkers.
Its hard to tell all from only 1 year and a few months, so much happened.
One last one, anti war protestors at the gate outside El-Toro Ca. Airfield, but it was home.

Short round (I know, there were a lot of short rounds)
PFC/LCpl
1965-1966 CHU-LIE RVN
USMC, GRUNT


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pappy177
Starting Member

6 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2009 :  2:04:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
realizing it was 40 years ago for me. But the VA has taking good care of me since then.



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pappy177
Starting Member

6 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2009 :  9:52:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was a crew chief those many years ago , we are being forgotten as ww1 and ww2 vets are , sad but true. Every nite I pray to GOD our boys come home safe from the current SNAFU.

me red beach


marble mountain



and this one is important

I don't know why I posted these old photos , maby the web will preserve them.
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soldierblue72
Starting Member

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2009 :  3:04:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was at Long Binh and Vung Tau '71-'72. I was never in the jungle. I remember 2 things off the top of my head:

1. The sound of cockroaches scrambling up the paper map on the wall of my hooch at night.

2. The sound of the mess truck cranking up at 0400 outside my hooch to go get the VN civilian cooks at Long Thanh.

Here's Peter A. Bird's photo of Long Binh Jail, built by the US Army Engineer Command Vietnam, including my unit, 92nd Engineer Battalion.


Edited by - soldierblue72 on 04/25/2009 3:05:53 PM
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Paddiegrunt
Starting Member

USA
19 Posts

Posted - 05/05/2009 :  1:57:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
roboat
Did you every fly into Tango Tango? Tan Tru home of the 2nd of the 60th Infantry. I think I remember the Grayhounds, I rode Eagle Flights out of there from 16 Oct 67 to 15 Oct 68 as a grunt.
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macvsogg
Starting Member

USA
4 Posts

Posted - 05/24/2009 :  05:28:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would like to thank all past and present Special Operations Men and Women who have kept, and keep the SF Traditions and Faith Alive.
"Thanks to all who have Served and continue to serve" "Godbless"

("You've Never Lived Till You've Almost Died.
For Those Who Fight For It'
Life Has A Flavor
The Protected Will Never Know")

Smitty out"
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swamprat
Starting Member

USA
14 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2009 :  4:55:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I know who you are,even if you don"t yet know.You"ve seen Death-you have been Death,yet only your Brothers and Sisters in arms know your great pain and suffering.You"ve seen the Very worst of Mankind,and you"ve been lucky enough to Be the Greatest Mankind has to offer.For our job we are only known as Vets.If Jhon Q.Public knew,realy knew what we know Wars might end.{Welcome Home}to all my brotherhood.
My first post.Michael Day Co.C 1st of 35 3rd beg. 4th Inf.Div. (68)


































my
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70-101
Senior Member

2368 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2009 :  06:26:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sgt.Peppers on Sunday nights after chow on AFVN.

The beautiful beachs, and the friends I left behind.
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johnhardy
Starting Member

11 Posts

Posted - 01/13/2010 :  3:15:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Getting that sad/glad feeling..The odor was death and decay and human excrement....Those darned water buffalo,seems to me that they hated Americans,,punji stakes,,living around the 'yards,I kinda liked them..Drinking rice wine from a crock jar through a straw...
humping a prc25 through the jungle,A1E's dropping he's or napalm,,
calling in artillery,naval gunfire,tac air,,seeing good men die
for a people who didn't care,,yeah,getting negative.......

johnhardy
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1USMC1
Starting Member

13 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2010 :  3:45:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What I remember......103 degrees at 8:00 AM, drinking water that smelled like Clorox bleach, burning poopters, C rations from the late 40's, salt tablets, spent brass, arc lights, no showers, scorpions, flying on CH 46's with the windows broken out and the ramps down, sweat,the smell of blood.

Vietnam '66-'67
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Nebrcowgirl
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2010 :  03:18:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found this forum a walk down the 1970s,and was very heartfelt and alot of strong words of I Cant wait till morning gets here.I tip my hat to all that served for us.
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Spokes
Junior Member

USA
341 Posts

Posted - 03/26/2010 :  7:10:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I read this forum every once in a while. It brings back memories - some good, some bad.

Vietnam 03/67 - 03/68
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Quackaddict
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 04/02/2010 :  03:16:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some of my memories of Viet Nam.
Smells: fish sauce, sweat, rotting everything, JP5, Charlie, hospitals, and mamason's cooking. Sights: napalm, Puff staffing the hillside, leafless trees, red dust from blade wash, my M60 rounds tearing through rice patties\hooch's\boats\humans, blood pouring out of dust off birds we were supporting as we flew back to DaNang, green tracers, battle weary men, tiger at 5 meters.
Sounds: the jungle at night when on ambush, screams of the enemy when they breached the wire, screams of my wounded and dieing friends, AK and other rounds as they fly by\hit flesh\canopy, DaNang ammo dump going up, incoming and outgoing mortar\arty rounds, the Jackson 5.
Feelings: scared but strangly excited, pulling leeches off my body, so tired even my hair (stubble) hurt, warmth of blood, the love\trust of my fellow Marines, emptiness of loosing those Marines, puzzlement when falling out of my bird, my legs when the nerves finally came alive (joy even though it burned like hell), the anger\betrayal when returning home.

USMC 10/68 - 7/69, 12/70 - 8/71, 12/71 - 8/72 (Laos mainly)

Charlie
Semper Fi
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kimi
Advanced Member

USA
43742 Posts

Posted - 04/02/2010 :  12:25:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Quackaddict

Some of my memories of Viet Nam.
Smells: fish sauce, sweat, rotting everything, JP5, Charlie, hospitals, and mamason's cooking. Sights: napalm, Puff staffing the hillside, leafless trees, red dust from blade wash, my M60 rounds tearing through rice patties\hooch's\boats\humans, blood pouring out of dust off birds we were supporting as we flew back to DaNang, green tracers, battle weary men, tiger at 5 meters.
Sounds: the jungle at night when on ambush, screams of the enemy when they breached the wire, screams of my wounded and dieing friends, AK and other rounds as they fly by\hit flesh\canopy, DaNang ammo dump going up, incoming and outgoing mortar\arty rounds, the Jackson 5.
Feelings: scared but strangly excited, pulling leeches off my body, so tired even my hair (stubble) hurt, warmth of blood, the love\trust of my fellow Marines, emptiness of loosing those Marines, puzzlement when falling out of my bird, my legs when the nerves finally came alive (joy even though it burned like hell), the anger\betrayal when returning home.

USMC 10/68 - 7/69, 12/70 - 8/71, 12/71 - 8/72 (Laos mainly)




What outfits did you serve with Quackaddict?

Welcome to GB.



What's next

A couple of favorite quotes:

"What goes around comes around."

“Abe, climb down from Mt. Rushmore, and vacate the penny. Your days in the pantheon are over, thanks to the scholarship and courage of Thomas J. DiLorenzo.” — Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr.



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Alan Rushing
Advanced Member

Suriname
9120 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2010 :  12:45:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

This has been good, following this strand, and finding some guys that were in country when I was, or some of the same same places.

Appreciated the photos - prangle and others, thanks!

We all have some bad memories, for sure ... but it is good remembering some of the rest ... especially the camaraderie and friends. And even the close calls.

Take care!
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brotus2
Junior Member

USA
148 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2010 :  5:52:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We could have won it in a month.
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roboat
Starting Member

11 Posts

Posted - 06/19/2010 :  6:42:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember RED tracers coming at me, and I'm tired of people telling me I'm full of crap, because they read on the internet that the enemy used green tracers. This was '67-'68, all over III Corps, flying Huey slicks 240th AHC, "Greyhounds." Yes, there were some green tracers, but mostly red. Maybe captured or spilled ammo, but I know I didn't piss off that many friendlies.


http://myspace.com/eatorlando
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roboat
Starting Member

11 Posts

Posted - 06/19/2010 :  7:05:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Paddiegrunt

roboat
Did you every fly into Tango Tango? Tan Tru home of the 2nd of the 60th Infantry. I think I remember the Grayhounds, I rode Eagle Flights out of there from 16 Oct 67 to 15 Oct 68 as a grunt.


Sorry to be slow to respond.
Yeah, I loved Eagle Flights because you guys almost always got what you went for. Tan Tru - between Tan An and Rach Kien? Our gunships were the MadDogs. Good chance we flew together. July 67 - June 68. Do you recall terrible landings with the pilot in tears? Cuz that was prolly me. :)
Welcome home.

http://myspace.com/eatorlando
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psychologist
Starting Member

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 09/12/2010 :  11:33:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Welcome home brothers" I had on a vet hat and shirt at a supermarket and a man was kind of circling me and looking me over and then came up and said "welcome home brother" this has happened a few times, but it seems most times its a fellow vet, but it still is refreshing.

One of my strongest Memories was after a firefight in which we were on a huge convoy going through heavy jungle and the front of our group was attacked(probably by a VC with a RPG in a spider hole) and there was extremely lot of rounds and action then we received a cease fire announcement, because we found out they had managed to get the front of our huge convoy to be firing at our rear by attacking from the other ends direction, because of the curve in the trail, someone finally figured that out. Then on the way back it started hailing large hail which I didn't think possible in that tropical climate, but in my diary I wrote it seemed like a fitting ending. Does anyone else remember any Hail-storms?

I also remember that if you were in heavy jungle with a M-79 you had better find some canister rounds because the other shells bounced off trees and often back at ya.

I remember a giant monster about 4 feet long with a head like a lion swooping down on a track slightly ahead of me(they shot it mid air with a shotgun) it seems they had been messing with it's baby. It was a giant flying squirrel that is only found in South-East Asia

We were in the largest convoy i had ever seen with Roam Plows,APC's and tanks heading to the Black Virgin Mountains to tear up Michelin Rubber Plantation
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Jim Rau
Advanced Member

USA
4275 Posts

Posted - 10/29/2010 :  8:35:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by roboat

I remember RED tracers coming at me, and I'm tired of people telling me I'm full of crap, because they read on the internet that the enemy used green tracers. This was '67-'68, all over III Corps, flying Huey slicks 240th AHC, "Greyhounds." Yes, there were some green tracers, but mostly red. Maybe captured or spilled ammo, but I know I didn't piss off that many friendlies.




The red was from the 51's! The AK tracers were green and would burn out at about 1500 feet. The 'big red wobbling basket balls' were the 51's. We flew mostly at 2000 agl and the red ones would go right on up! I don't know how far they would go before they burnt out.

Self defence is an absolute and natural right. An armed society is not always polite, but it is A FREE AND SAFE SOCIETY! Keep your head down and your powder dry! J. Rau, Alabama
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cavman 69
Junior Member

459 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2010 :  5:09:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
the heat, 110 almost every day. running for a bunker in the middle of the night. red dust everywhere. c-47 gun ships with mini-guns at night with tracers. b-52 strikes in the middle of the night. welcome home my brothers- when we die we will all go to heaven, because we spent out time in hell. first cav '69-'70.

warning,common sense isn't so common.
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GreyhoundDriver
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2010 :  6:31:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Prangle: Thanks for posting the picture of the Greyhound helicopter. I was a pilot in the Greyhounds from October 1967 through August 1968 and if it's the right time frame I could have been the pilot on that helicopter. If we ever meet the beers are on me. Greyhound 28
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1935Lee
New Member

53 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2010 :  03:36:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Things I remember? 38 months in-country and there isn't a thing I don't remember
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psychologist
Starting Member

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2011 :  4:22:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember 2 guys proudly and exhaustively carrying an old bazooka and amo through a lot of rough terrain, waiting for their chance to clobber something with their bazooka. They finally got a chance to test -fire it at a range and it didn't fire, boy was that a lot of wasted effort. I never heard any more about it but I sure hope they got it working and all their efforts finally paid off Larry Dahlka---Michigan
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hunter4343
Starting Member

5 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2011 :  08:05:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is there anyone out there that was with the 4th Inf. 1966 or 1967. Thanks
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marinetdb
Starting Member

1 Posts

Posted - 03/17/2011 :  7:31:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's some pix I put together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4m6wss0oxhQ
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Gunny0321
Starting Member

USA
26 Posts

Posted - 03/18/2011 :  12:30:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I also remember each and every second about Viet Nam, not by the minute or the hour or even by the day or month, but every Damn second.

My memories are similar to many already posted so I won't bore anyone with repeating them. But one of those I just can't help but repeat: The Smell, man o man the smell, it just knocked you down the first time. It was stale Food, stale piss, Stale People Smell, Copper (that one took me a while to figure out) there was this smell of a wet penny especially around Da Nang and the 51st Evac Hospital, finally I realized it was the blood, man blood has that copper smell i will never forget that.The other smells Smoked meat, even the sand smelt and there was sand everywere, in your cloths, mouth, teeth everywere.

Fighting house to house in "Hue" after Tet began. The ammo dump at Camp Evans going up in smoke and the fight afterwords that went on and on. The extraction choppers coming in to snatch our butts when we finally got close enough to the DMZ for them to get in and out. The Phantom Dueces coming in and laying us down a path, flying so low you could see the Pilots smile sometimes and the RIO's waving like a idiot, man those guys always looked good to us, Thanks Flyboys we all owe you a beer!!! First rounds on me just pick the place..

I also remember so many we lost, I remember not ever wanting to make another friend as long as I lived, it just hurts too bad to seeing them laying there in there own blood and not one damn thing you can do to make it go away, or to stop hurting for the last 5 minutes of there all too young life. I remeber the pain mostly, not from bleeding or having a hole that is leaking somewhere on your hide, that happened almost everyday in one way or the other, but the pain from the loss. Bullet holes heal that pain never, ever goes away.

I also remember the Dust-Off chopper and the bravest men I have ever known in that chopper flying into a LZ that my recon team had to blow in the bush with the last Claymores they had, to fly my shot up butt out of there. I remember the days that seemed like years laying in that bed at Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, waiting on the cutter one more time. Going to a Medical Holding company on Treasure Island and finally fighting myself back on active duty, and then the fight it took to finally return to the War in Nam, and I very well remember the feeling on arriving back at Da Nang walking off of the chopper and wondering "How In The Hell Did You End Up Back Here?"

I remember as many of you do, it may be 35 or 40 years in Historical time, but to those who lived it It "Was Just A Momment Ago".........

RS

Protected people will never be able to understand the intensity life "CAN" be lived at. To do that you must complettly understand the meaning of the word --DUCK--
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WaltherP-38
New Member

USA
67 Posts

Posted - 06/30/2011 :  9:32:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
While I didn't serve in VN,I served in the US Army,6 months stateside, 2 1/2 years in the Republic of W.Germany. There wasn't a day that passed,that we didn't see what was going on in VN. A hell hole for sure. I just want to thank everyone who served in Nam,Korea,all the past wars & now the future wars. You are the heroes that let us keep our freedom. Thank you very much! Take care.

U.S. Army 1964-1967
Battalion blacksmith
1/37th Armor 4th Armor Division Ansbach,Germany

Edited by - WaltherP-38 on 06/30/2011 9:35:53 PM
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70-101
Senior Member

2368 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2011 :  07:14:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I can see Red Foxx standing next to Bob Hope in the above picture.

Which in 1972 would have been taken during the first season of Sanford and Son...
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Sting
Member

USA
676 Posts

Posted - 08/21/2011 :  06:52:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When our platoon saw the show it also included a band I'd never heard before, The Hondells, who sand their big hit about the little Honda motorcycle--"First gear, it's all right..second gear, lean right..third gear, hang on tight..Hondaaa."



A-1-13
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Rick S.
Starting Member

USA
31 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2011 :  9:29:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sitting on pack, poncho pulled tight, bush hat pulled down, trying to catch some shut eye in a pouring down rain.

Rotting vegetation on the jungle floor has a faint glow if you look close.

Babboons in the trees.

B.O. of the NVA. ( We probably smelled just as bad to them)

Sawhorses in triage at 1st Med and the garden hoses the personnel used to wash us down.

Nonstop thunder and "lightning" from the arc-lights.

Watching "Spooky" work out with it's Gatling gun.

Watching the ammo dump at DaNang blow up from 25 mi. away in April of '69.

Edited by - Rick S. on 08/25/2011 9:33:27 PM
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River Rat
Advanced Member

USA
9010 Posts

Posted - 08/30/2011 :  5:54:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't try to remember. But some things set you off -- like the smell of diesel fumes. Then I can recall the sound of the boat engines. The rattle of hundreds of empty .50 cal brass sliding across the deck.

Muggy heat. Bugs. A distant Huey. The constant septic-tank stink of the river, and the slosh of the boat wake in the roots as we go by. The people often didn't trust us -- they were nice enough, but they had that look, like a wall separated us. Too many decades of war. The Japanese, the French, now we were here. Why were we here? They didn't know we were asking the same question. It's more clear to me now than it was then.


An armed society is a polite society -- R. Heinlein
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Jim Rau
Advanced Member

USA
4275 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2011 :  12:43:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Classic095

Only 2 things I like to remember about Vietnam.. The two days that I left there.

196th Infantry
1968-1969
1971-1972

The media did make a couple good movies about my outfit..IE: Tour of Duty.

If you were with the 196th in 71 more than likely I gave you a ride.
71st AHC, the Rattlers!

Self defence is an absolute and natural right. An armed society is not always polite, but it is A FREE AND SAFE SOCIETY! Keep your head down and your powder dry! J. Rau, Alabama
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