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 Standard Arms of Wilmington DE
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Standard Arms
Starting Member

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  11:03:54 AM  Show Profile
Looking for anything concerning standard arms, guns, tools, advertising etc. I am also compliling a list of serial numbers by model and calibre in the hopes of making some sense out of the production schedule.
Especially looking for a camp gun and a model M 25

Old Fool
Senior Member

USA
1837 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  11:13:56 AM  Show Profile
This site has some information http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/findaids/cramp_ed.htm

Here is a little more:

"Standard Arms started production in Wilmington, DE, in Sept., 1909, and the company folded in 1912. The company was restarted in 1913 as Standard Arms Mfg. Co., and closed in April, 1914.
Nearly 5,000 rifles were manufactured at the actual factory. At the time the plant closed, approx. 2,200 rifles were in various stages of production, and a supply of parts remained. These were primarily purchased by Numrich Arms, made into complete rifles, and sold. Total production (Standard Arms, Standard Arms Mfg. Co. & those assembled by Numrich Arms) reached approx. 7,000 rifles. The highest known serial number is 9012. Within serialization, it is noted that large blocks of numbers were abandoned, and this is thought to be due to changes and improvements made during production. In addition, as the factory folded with a large number of rifles in partial stages of production, it is often not possible to determine which rifles were actually made and completed at the factory, and which were completed outside the factory at a later date.
Many special order options were available, such as checkering, pistol grip, deluxe grades of woods, special sights, etc. Several grades of engraving were available, including Rocky Mountain, Adirondack, Sierra, and Selkirk. Lower priced "etched" models were also available and less frequently encountered than engraved models. A .50 caliber "Camp Carbine" was offered in smooth bore, slide action only. Approx. 25-30 were manufactured and utilized a special cartridge similar to the .50-70 shot cartridge. These are rarely encountered, although they are known to exist in collections."

Hope this helps


He who governs least governs best.

NRA Distinguished Member

Edited by - Old Fool on 12/13/2006 11:14:46 AM
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rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15441 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  11:25:14 AM  Show Profile
quote:
Originally posted by Old Fool

This site has some information http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/findaids/cramp_ed.htm

Here is a little more:

"Standard Arms started production in Wilmington, DE, in Sept., 1909, and the company folded in 1912. The company was restarted in 1913 as Standard Arms Mfg. Co., and closed in April, 1914.
Nearly 5,000 rifles were manufactured at the actual factory. At the time the plant closed, approx. 2,200 rifles were in various stages of production, and a supply of parts remained. These were primarily purchased by Numrich Arms, made into complete rifles, and sold. Total production (Standard Arms, Standard Arms Mfg. Co. & those assembled by Numrich Arms) reached approx. 7,000 rifles. The highest known serial number is 9012. Within serialization, it is noted that large blocks of numbers were abandoned, and this is thought to be due to changes and improvements made during production. In addition, as the factory folded with a large number of rifles in partial stages of production, it is often not possible to determine which rifles were actually made and completed at the factory, and which were completed outside the factory at a later date.
Many special order options were available, such as checkering, pistol grip, deluxe grades of woods, special sights, etc. Several grades of engraving were available, including Rocky Mountain, Adirondack, Sierra, and Selkirk. Lower priced "etched" models were also available and less frequently encountered than engraved models. A .50 caliber "Camp Carbine" was offered in smooth bore, slide action only. Approx. 25-30 were manufactured and utilized a special cartridge similar to the .50-70 shot cartridge. These are rarely encountered, although they are known to exist in collections."

Hope this helps






Believe your in error in regard to Numrich, assembling Standard Arms Rifles after they went out of business. This was a good 35 years before Numrich even existed. More then likely it was Francis Bannerman.

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Old Fool
Senior Member

USA
1837 Posts

Posted - 12/13/2006 :  12:00:50 PM  Show Profile
Thanks Rufe, that was a quote from BB, and I am unaware of its veracity

He who governs least governs best.

NRA Distinguished Member
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Standard Arms
Starting Member

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2006 :  2:41:55 PM  Show Profile
Thank you all for responding. I gather a few new bits of information, but as we all can see there are inconsistencies in the information. I am trying to unravel the truth. I am keeping a record of each gun I have seen by type, serial number and calibre.Maybe it will show some sort of logical production order. Thanks for the help.
Ed
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Old Fool
Senior Member

USA
1837 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2006 :  4:40:17 PM  Show Profile
"Standard Arms Co.(1909-1911) and Standard arms Mfg Co (1912-1914). Wilmington DE gas operated and slide action hammerless rifles. Quantity estimated as high as 12,000. An intriguing rifle with eye-appeal and little published information. Handsome, high relief decorated, wide brassgrip covers on the front slide, with matching buttplate, Achieved little commercial success. 2 basic models, offered in various qualities and custom features. Calibers 25-35,30-30, 35 Remington. Barrels 22" (25" on earlier G/H models). After 1912 "Camp Model" advertised for .50 cal buckshot or round ball (rare and worth a premium" Model G gas operated "Automatic Rifle" Early attempt to employ gas to operate a piston driven gum meahanism. Gas tube under barrel almost full length to muzzle has switch at gas port to allow for simiauto use or conventional manual slide action (the Gmodil believed to have replaced the nearly idinticle short lived "Model H"."

Quoteed from Flayderman's (7th edition).

He who governs least governs best.

NRA Distinguished Member
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Ross
Junior Member

USA
176 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2006 :  5:29:59 PM  Show Profile
Numrich, Gun Parts Corp, still has a few parts available.
The references to .25-35, .30-30 and .35 Remington have always puzzled me and I suspect the reference is to what was once called the .30-30Remington and not the .30WCF we know today. Has anyone seen a Standard chambered for the listed Winchester or the .35 Remington cartridges?
My two Model G's, (Standard Arms Co.) are marked CAL 25 and CAL 30. and are for the Remington rimless cartridges.
Cheers from Darkest California,
Ross
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muskokabird
Starting Member

Canada
3 Posts

Posted - 01/10/2007 :  4:16:11 PM  Show Profile
I am just in the process of inheriting a Standard Arm 35 Remington, pump action rifle! It is exstremely ornate, with a carved brass forestock and butt plate.
This gun was purchased new by the father of my dad's best friend(all deceased) for approx. $17.00. The gun was used for hunting right up until 15 yrs ago and has shot many deer and moose.
I do not have the gun in my posession just yet,but have hunted with it in the past.
I just went on the net to try and discover something about the gun and it"s manufacturer and stumbled upon this forum. I would also appreciate any info on it !
Thanks---from Canada!![Iquote]Originally posted by muskokabird

quote:
Originally posted by Ross

Numrich, Gun Parts Corp, still has a few parts available.
The references to .25-35, .30-30 and .35 Remington have always puzzled me and I suspect the reference is to what was once called the .30-30Remington and not the .30WCF we know today. Has anyone seen a Standard chambered for the listed Winchester or the .35 Remington cartridges?
My two Model G's, (Standard Arms Co.) are marked CAL 25 and CAL 30. and are for the Remington rimless cartridges.
Cheers from Darkest California,
Ross


[/quote]
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shepherdsglen
Starting Member

USA
2 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2009 :  6:30:30 PM  Show Profile
Any one out there still interested in Standard Arms rifles?

Steve Templeman
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fire15vp
Starting Member

USA
5 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2009 :  09:28:41 AM  Show Profile
[quote]Originally posted by shepherdsglen

Any one out there still interested in Standard Arms rifles?
[/quo
I am always interested in low digit or unusual digit serial numbers,information on Standard, or leads to anything relating to Standard.
Did you buy these off the internet?
Do you have the combo tool?
What is the serial numbers?

Ed
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vc.chadwick
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2009 :  11:23:47 PM  Show Profile
I'm looking for pictures of a standard model G . I bought a junker and I need pics of the gas cutoff knob and the rear sight so I can try to make them . My gun is a 30. with a 4 digit number . Any help would be appreciated .
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