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 laundering field jacket?
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Henry0Reilly
Advanced Member

USA
13707 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  07:01:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found a genuine GI field jacket (coat, cold weather, field, OG-107) at a thrift store.

The instructions say, "For cleaning and restoring of water repellency, return to the laundry for washing in accordance with procedures for quarpel treated garments."

Does anyone know what those procedures might be?



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williamprynn
Junior Member

Czech Republic
421 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  08:10:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used to put mine in the washing machine and then the dryer. But that was thirty five years ago and it was all cotton.
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11b6r
Advanced Member

USA
13082 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  09:17:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quarpel is a water repellent added to cotton. Basically, machine wash warm, tumble dry, no bleach.

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spanielsells
Advanced Member

16195 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  09:36:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quarpel requires inverting the flux capacitor to its pre-sarcamungeon status and coupling it with a non-disruptive shield modulation unit.

Everyone knows that!

April 19, 1775
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Txs
Advanced Member

15947 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  09:57:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Preferably have it dry cleaned.

If you want to do it yourself use the permanent press setting on your machine and double rinse with warm water (residual detergent degrades water repellance).

It's best to hang and let it drip dry, but you can use a machine on a low temp setting. If you do this, remove it immediately after drying to keep it from sitting against the hot metal. It's actually best if you get it "not quite dry" and take it out to finish drying while hanging. The important point is that high heat is the enemy of Quarpel treatment.
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Viktor
Advanced Member

22344 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  09:58:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I wouldn't spend money on getting it washed unless it's in superb condition. If it's so-so, just wash it at home, because the chances are better that it was rarely washed correctly under its previous ownership.
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IAMACLONE_2
Advanced Member

USA
4633 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  10:16:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your supossed to wash them???
Wow!!
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320090T
Senior Member

USA
1522 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  10:22:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can you spray "Camp Dry" on it to restore water repellentcy? Repellency, is that a word?
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nononsense
Moderator

8967 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  10:39:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Henry0Reilly,

My guess is that due to the loss of repellancy from friction and the limit of 15 launderings as mentioned below, that you should should just wash it normally and don't worry because the repellancy is most likely gone.

Quarpel Finish: Refers to a water-repellent finish used on fabric or thread, which causes water to bead up and run-off rather than absorb into the fabric. This is a special finish that must be processed on request. It can adversely affect the frictional characteristics of the thread. (See Thread Finishing.)

Textile Treatments:


Quarpel:

Quarpel water-repellent is a water and stain resistant textile treatment that was developed by Natick Research Laboratories in the late 1960s for use in combat clothing and equipment. “Quarpel” is an acronym for “Quartermaster Repellent” that was coined by the Natick scientist inventor. The water repellent is still used commercially in top clothing lines and is used in many other commercial items such as upholstery and carpeting. The military uses Quarpel extensively in rain protective combat clothing and equipment. The repellent has the unique capability to repel water and organic liquids, such as chemical warfare agents, and withstands repeated laundering.

History:

In 1959, a breakthrough in rainwear treatments by technologists at the Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratories (now U.S. Army Natick Laboratories), made a satisfactory and attractive military raincoat possible at last. Chemists at these Laboratories combined two commercially available water repellents to synergistically produce a highly durable water-repellent and oil-resistant treatment for textiles. This treatment, named "Quarpel" as a Quartermaster-developed repellent, freed Army clothing designers from the necessity of using coated fabrics for rainwear.

The Quarpel treatment could withstand up to 15 launderings without re-treatment and still retain greater water repellency than the best vapor permeable raincoats then on the market. Fabrics treated with the compound remained vapor permeable and free from uncomfortable moisture condensation (24).

The Quartermaster Corps had applied Quarpel to field and combat clothing and the results confirmed their hopes that the treatment could provide a rain garment which was efficiently water-repellent, washable and comfortable. Accordingly, in 1964 the Army adopted a semidress raincoat utilizing the Quarpel treatment to replace the coated fabric taupe raincoat for all male personnel.

The new raincoat was a lighter but harmonizing shade of green for wear with the Army Green uniform and was made of a single layer of 5 ounce, cotton polyester fabric with an inside shoulder yoke. Because of its washability and better drape, the new raincoat provided an improved appearance and promised a longer service life than the current standard.







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Henry0Reilly
Advanced Member

USA
13707 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  10:40:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 320090T

Can you spray "Camp Dry" on it to restore water repellentcy? Repellency, is that a word?



Apparently it's military word. My spell check didn't recognize it.

Thanks for the replies.



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PATBUZZARD
Advanced Member

USA
3269 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  11:13:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If we're just talking about an M65 field jacket, throw it in the wash and forget about it. It'll be fine!


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Txs
Advanced Member

15947 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  11:58:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PATBUZZARD

If we're just talking about an M65 field jacket, throw it in the wash and forget about it. It'll be fine!

Let me guess...Army. Right?
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mrseatle
Advanced Member

USA
16779 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  4:25:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It means just use soap and water as most laundry detergents and starches will cause the garmet to "glow" in night vision.

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catpealer111
Advanced Member

Belarus
8641 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  4:28:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After you wash it and you need more water proofing, just do what we do to our Gore Tex on the flight line. Get it covered with oil, hydro, jet fuel, and deicer fluid. Water proof and 100% environmentally friendly.
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hicap47
Member

670 Posts

Posted - 12/14/2006 :  5:06:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hang your jacket over a length of commo wire and flail it with your e-tool to get the road dust off.

Fill a powder cannister or VT fuze can with the pee colored water from the water trailer (if there's no water trailer around, find the nearest stream).

Get a bar of Lifebuoy soap from the SP pack.

Dunk your field jacket in the water and throw the bar of soap in with it.

Agitate the water vigorously using both arms (if you're using a powder cannister, only one arm will fit inside).

Let the mixture soak while you smoke a cigarette.

Remove the jacket and ring it out (don't worry about rinsing the soap out, it just makes it smell better).

Throw it back over the commo wire to dry......


Edited by - hicap47 on 12/14/2006 5:08:34 PM
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