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 REM-UMC brass shotgun shells????
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jms92
Starting Member

2 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  06:37:09 AM  Show Profile
I have a bunch of Brass shotgun shells, REM-UMC BEST no.12. Any information on these will be appreciated. I was wondering the history about them, when where they made? what where they used for? and what are they worth?

Thanks....

4440rk
Junior Member

USA
436 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  12:45:23 PM  Show Profile
I cannot tell you when the REM-UMC were made but Cabelas has new ones priced at 20.99 for 25. As compared to some 14 gauge I am having custom turned for $52 + for 20. If you reload and take care of them they can be reloaded almost forever.
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heavyiron
Senior Member

USA
1410 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  5:07:45 PM  Show Profile
Hi,

If the headstamp looks like the below these are REM-UMC all brass shotshells from the period 1911 through 1934. Remington combined with UMC (Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Bridgeport, CT) in 1911. In 1934 Dupont Corp. bought out REM-UMC and Peters to form Remington Arms Company.



Brass cases of this vintage are probably worth $1.00 to $3.00 per casing. Brass shotshells were commonly made during this time period and earlier because the use of paper had not yet been perfected, especially waterproofing the paper. The original paper shotshells would swell when wet and would jam in the chamber. These were used for regular hunting and sporting purposes just like the shotshells of today.

Hope this helps.

Heavyiron


"If I don't see you nomore on this world, I'll meet you on the next one, and don't be late!" - Jimi Hendrix

Edited by - heavyiron on 01/27/2008 5:09:30 PM
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11b6r
Advanced Member

USA
13198 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  8:47:41 PM  Show Profile
In addition to the sporting uses, they had a military use- but generally loaded with buckshot. Again, to overcome the swelling of wet paper shells. In my very modest collection, have at least one each all brass 10, 12, 16, 20, and 410.

"Minds are like parachutes. Just because you've lost yours doesn't mean you can borrow mine."
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jms92
Starting Member

2 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  9:17:38 PM  Show Profile
Did brass shells originally get reloaded with black powder? I'm envisioning black powder used in double guns. What is the reason for the small primer? It is not a standard 209. What would be a typical load used today? Red dot? 700x? Who uses these today? Cowboy action shooters?

Again many thanks for the info......
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grumpygy
Advanced Member

USA
32317 Posts

Posted - 01/27/2008 :  10:02:58 PM  Show Profile
Just read an article on using Brass for Cowboy action. The Author would use them as the very last choice. Seems he had a problem of them Jaming in the gun.

Grumpy Gunny
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v35
Advanced Member

USA
12626 Posts

Posted - 02/02/2008 :  5:44:04 PM  Show Profile
The Army used some at least till the end of the Korean war.
Remington full length brass shells in 00 Buck were used in riot guns for guard duty. They could withstand repeated loading and unloading every two hours without getting beaten up causing jams as cardboard shells would.
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Iroquois Scout
Member

959 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2008 :  3:24:38 PM  Show Profile
I load them with 90 grains of FF black powder for use in my Winchester model 1887 shotgun and in my early Remington side by side shotgun. You need to use over size wads because the brass shells have thiner walls. Use 11 gauge wads in a 12 gauge brass shell. These wads are available from a number of sources such as Dixie Gun Works and Midway. I use the CCI 200 primer and never have had any problem with them. You can use a plastic shot wrapper if you want tighter patterns, but, you can not use an all in one plastic wad or there will not be enougth room in the case. Another reason for useing brass shells in the old guns is that many of he old guns have 2-1/2" chambers rather then the modern 2-3/4" length. The brass shells don't have a fold that has open into the barrel so you can use them in the shorter chamber.
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Iroquois Scout
Member

959 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2008 :  3:37:13 PM  Show Profile
I forgot to say that you must wash the cartridge cases in hot soapy water then clear hot water and then let them dry after you use them with black powder or the black powder residue will corrode the casas.
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Cassy
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2010 :  6:59:56 PM  Show Profile
So I have 2 of these full metal jacketed shotgun shells that have never been fired. They have been in a box for who knows how long.. Does this make them worth anything?
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Tailgunner1954
Advanced Member

7246 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2010 :  7:21:40 PM  Show Profile
Cassy
That depends on exactly what they are, who made them, when they were made, and how badly someone want's them.
Perhaps $5-10 ea for something relitivly common, to maybe $100 ir they are something truely rare (and if you find the proverbial "right" buyer).
99.99% of the time they will fall into the "common as dirt" catagory.
We did have a poster 3-4 years ago that asked about a box of 22 shorts he bought at a garage sale, turned out they were made in the 1870's and the box was in excelant condition (ya, he made out like a bandit)

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Some guys like a mag full of lead, I still prefer one round to the head.
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