GunBroker.com Message Forums
Review our Posting Guidelines
GunBroker.com Message Forums
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?   Trouble / Can't log in?

 All Forums
 GunBroker.com Message Forums
 General Discussion
 Wolves (grubs?) in rabbits
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/25/2008 :  11:34:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Picked up my neighbors rabbit today and it had 3 huge knots on it. I knew what it was. Question is: how or what can you do to get them out? Is there any treatement?

I vaguely remember when I was a kid, that they killed several of my dad's rabbits.

I have tried to Google "wolves in rabbits"and I get the 4 legged type of wolves eating rabbits. What/how do I search to find info on these things.

What bug is it that causes this? I, and most SEA vets are aware of the "bot" fly that bites you lays and egg and you get the same thing, a grub growing in your flesh. Any info will be appreciated. Tom

Those who beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who don't.

redneckandy
Advanced Member

USA
6590 Posts

Posted - 07/25/2008 :  11:37:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Aren't those just a type of roundworm?

"Dazzle them with brilliance of baffle them with BS."

"Chains is coming"

"ONLY THE PARANOID SURVIVE"

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Go to Top of Page

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/25/2008 :  11:51:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andy, nope, as far as I know. These are grubs that live in the flesh of animals. Roundworm was a totally differant sort of condition. Tom
Go to Top of Page

redneckandy
Advanced Member

USA
6590 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:13:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just asked my GF and she said bot flies also, and dewormer should take care of them.

"Dazzle them with brilliance of baffle them with BS."

"Chains is coming"

"ONLY THE PARANOID SURVIVE"

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Go to Top of Page

quickmajik
Advanced Member

USA
18444 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:15:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They live in the fleesh of Animals. You find them in squirrels sometimes. Disgusting!

Edited by - quickmajik on 07/26/2008 12:16:37 AM
Go to Top of Page

dcon12
Advanced Member

Georgia
26957 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:17:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I always heard to not eat rabbits in a month without a R in them. Don
Go to Top of Page

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:22:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, is there any treatment for the bunny that already has them? What happens if you just leave them alone? Will the grub just crawl out and will the wound heal. I mean this is a pretty good size swelling in the rabbits skin. You can see the grub moving around in there. Pretty discusting.
Is this a grub from the horse fly? I know they can make a pretty painful bite. Tom
Go to Top of Page

quickmajik
Advanced Member

USA
18444 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:22:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Once I shot a rabbit in summer and after I skinned it there was these strange muscle movements. like a ripple under the skin. I would not eat it. I know one thing though, it was not a wolve.
Go to Top of Page

Highball
Advanced Member

18220 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:22:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Warbels.

We called them 'worvals' back in the day...bot fly larvae.

http://www.zootoo.com/journals_j_healthwellness/informationbotfliesakawarbels_marthalovesanimals

Go to Top of Page

quickmajik
Advanced Member

USA
18444 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:25:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tccox

OK, is there any treatment for the bunny that already has them? What happens if you just leave them alone? Will the grub just crawl out and will the wound heal. I mean this is a pretty good size swelling in the rabbits skin. You can see the grub moving around in there. Pretty discusting.
Is this a grub from the horse fly? I know they can make a pretty painful bite. Tom



No Horse flies lay eggs in tall grass, it looks like spit.
Go to Top of Page

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:38:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quickmajik, that kis just what they are, worms under the skin. Naturally they are going to move after you shoot the rabbit. (I guess) Tom
Go to Top of Page

quickmajik
Advanced Member

USA
18444 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:46:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wolves usually make a hole that breaks the skin, There was no lump or hole, thats what was strange about it.
Go to Top of Page

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:46:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andy, we are talking about two different animals. Roundworms are intetional sort of things. Another sort of roundworm is< I guess what we called them down here. It was a skin infection that looked like some sort of spiral, whence we called roundworm!! Tom
Go to Top of Page

sharpshooter039
Advanced Member

USA
4372 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  12:54:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bot Fly / Warbles Lump under skin. On inspection you will see a hole in the center where the larvae entered. Clip fur from area, sterilize with rubbing alcohol or iodine. Remove larvae with tweezers (may have to make a small incision to grasp the larvae). Treat with antibiotics to guard against secondary infection. Deeper infestation will require anesthesia and surgical removal

what I could find on the net,I looked up warbles,thats what they are called in tame rabbits,same thing as wolves in wild rabbits
Go to Top of Page

minitruck83
Advanced Member

USA
4412 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  01:03:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
sharpshooter. you beat me to it.
I had never heard em called wolves before.
Had a neighbor who'd cut them out of squirrels and fry em up anyway.



Allen
Go to Top of Page

redneckandy
Advanced Member

USA
6590 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  01:04:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tccox

Andy, we are talking about two different animals. Roundworms are intetional sort of things. Another sort of roundworm is< I guess what we called them down here. It was a skin infection that looked like some sort of spiral, whence we called roundworm!! Tom


Yeah, I asked my girl friend, she said bot flies. I was wrong on the roundworm part.

"Dazzle them with brilliance of baffle them with BS."

"Chains is coming"

"ONLY THE PARANOID SURVIVE"

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Go to Top of Page

wlfmn323
Advanced Member

USA
3035 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  02:41:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tccox

Andy, we are talking about two different animals. Roundworms are intetional sort of things. Another sort of roundworm is< I guess what we called them down here. It was a skin infection that looked like some sort of spiral, whence we called roundworm!! Tom



they call that ringworm around here.
dont know if its the same thing as these worvels(?) but what we call bore worms bore under the skin and live off of the fatty tissue. those usually have to be cut out.

DEO GRATIAS!

fear the government that fears its people
fear the government with greater firepower (unknown)

"looks like a mauser to me" (dallas police officer)

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. (Unknown)
Go to Top of Page

tccox
Advanced Member

4475 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  03:22:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wlfmf. bingo on the RINGWORM!! Kids that played in the chicken chit and dirt would get them. I suppose it was some sort of infection from the dirt. It was quite common since most of the people I knew had chickens and other animals around and we all played in said dirt. Tom
Go to Top of Page

47studebaker
Senior Member

USA
1393 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  08:27:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
don't know the name, but in northern states you waited until a hard frost to eat rabbits, supposed to kill the worms !
Go to Top of Page

Horse Plains Drifter
Advanced Member

USA
24860 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  08:53:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Our cattle used to be tormented by a fly called a heel fly. The flys lay eggs on the heels or hocks. The eggs hatch and the larve(sp?) burrow under the skin and in to the blood stream. The larve mature while traveling through the animal's blood system. When they are mature they exit the animal causing sores or bumps like tccox is talking about. I can remember my dad squeezing these sores like a zit and this big old grub poping out. Disgusting it was. The fly egg hatching must not be real sucessful, because I can only remember two of our animals getting grubs, and the heel flys would terrorize the cattle half the summer. The cattle would run and beller to a swampy area and get in the mud to coat their legs up to their knees. This would stop the flys somewhat. I was told that one of those larve can kill a cow if it ends up in their heart.

I have seen Bot flys on Discovery Channel and they do something simlar. To Humans also.


81st FA BN WWII...Thanks Dad

U!S!A! ALL THE WAY!!
CA#8......3%

Gadsdens by Werwolf
Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted

26702 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  10:24:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is caused by the Warble-Fly,

One form of external parasite that you may encounter on rabbits is known as the Warble-fly or Bot-fly (Cuterebra cuniculi). It is actually the larval "grub" of this fly that is quite unpleasant to look at. The warble-fly larvae burrow into the flesh and can be found in the neck, spine and groin region of the rabbit. The grub lives under the skin of cottontails until it develops into an adult fly. The grub is black in color and about one inch in length. It is one half to an inch wide, has a segmented appearance and is covered with short, black bristles. The larval grub does not lessen food quality of the meat except at the point of contact. Remove the small area of affected flesh that was around the grub and the rest of the meat will be perfectly edible!









Go to Top of Page

fishkiller41
Advanced Member

USA
39399 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  10:48:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 47studebaker

don't know the name, but in northern states you waited until a hard frost to eat rabbits, supposed to kill the worms !


+1 Studebaker;
That's why the small game" season in NJ opens on the second saturday in Nov. To allow for a few good hard frosts/freezes. Not only killed-off the worms, but the fleas as well. I still never hunted rabbits, if it hadn't come a good hard freeze yet.
Neighbor used to goop the lump up w/vasoline and pluck the suckers out with tweezers when they come up for air, since the worm breaths through the little opening in the skin. YUKK!!
Go to Top of Page

allen griggs
Advanced Member

USA
27120 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  11:21:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Down in Georgia they call them "wolves."

I was always told, "Don't eat a rabbit that has the wolves."
Go to Top of Page

JamesRK
Advanced Member

USA
21540 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  11:22:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is from an article about wild squirrels, but it shouldn’t be much different.

http://entomology.ifas.ufl.edu/slansky/botfly/abotfly/overview.htm#whattodo

Bot fly larvae can be relatively easily removed from an infested squirrel by carefully pulling them out through the warble pore using forceps (without the need and risks of anesthesia or a surgical incision), followed by rinsing out the empty warble with an antiseptic and treating with topical and oral antibiotics. This procedure is relatively straight-forward and poses little risk to the animal if done properly by a trained wildlife rehabilitator or veterinarian.

Manual removal of the bots is currently the only treatment for bot fly-infested squirrels. Antiparasitic drugs such as ivermectin are used to kill non-insect arthropod (mites) and nematode pests of dogs, cattle, etc., but their use against bot fly larvae in squirrels has not been studied and thus these drugs should not be used. Even if such treatments killed the larvae, if they were not physically removed from the warbles, infection would likely occur, possibly causing the squirrel's tissue to become necrotic, requiring surgery and antibiotic treatment.


Go to Top of Page

trapguy2007
Advanced Member

USA
8608 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2008 :  11:56:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by quickmajik

Once I shot a rabbit in summer and after I skinned it there was these strange muscle movements. like a ripple under the skin. I would not eat it. I know one thing though, it was not a wolve.


Always hunted rabbits and squirels after the first frost .
Parasites are gone by then (according to my grandfather ).
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
GunBroker.com Message Forums © 1999-2014 GB Investments, Inc. All Rights Reserved Go To Top Of Page
Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.06


Visit GunBroker.com at: www.gunbroker.com
Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the site's User Agreement
Site Map