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 Stevens Model 620
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101Thompson
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  8:37:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hiya folks. Last year I purchased a Stevens Model 620 12 Gauge at a local gun shop. I couldn't refuse the price ($180)...especially when I noticed the arsenal stamp on the barrel near the receiver. I was wondering exactly when this shotgun was made and what it might be worth. Its serial number is 6361 and is all numbers matching (at least every number I've been able to find is matching). Peculiarly it has a 30" barrel on it. Anyone have any ideas?

Wehrmacht_45
Advanced Member

3231 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  9:04:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We need pics, good close up pics, to give a value.

Also I have a feeling the "arsenal" or ordnance stamping is authentic since it is on a 30in barrel.


That being said, I have a 20ga version and they are a neat older design, originating from the Browning designed 520 model.

America... just a nation of two hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable.
Hunter S. Thompson
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rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15676 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  10:53:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Blue Book has a nice write up on them. The Stevens 620 military shotguns were made during World War II. Serial Number range 1,000-30,000. I have a old 26 edition B.B., the long barreled guns are valued at between $250 & $500 depending on condition. Looks like you made out OK.
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Wehrmacht_45
Advanced Member

3231 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2009 :  10:57:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Must have been for bomber training then. I know that they used clay busting as training for bomber gunners. I just did not think the 620 was among them. Learn something new everyday.


America... just a nation of two hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable.
Hunter S. Thompson
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101Thompson
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  4:17:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll go ahead and take some photos tonight when I get home from work. Thanks folks.
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101Thompson
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2009 :  6:27:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the photos as promised:



















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101Thompson
Starting Member

4 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2009 :  7:13:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
anyone have a better guess on approx age and value?
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redman.com1
Member

USA
511 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2009 :  04:09:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
1942 and $400 tops.

IM NOT GOING TO LET THE FACTS GET IN THE WAY OF MY OPINION.
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gary wray
Advanced Member

USA
5383 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2009 :  11:13:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Came to this post late. I am a Stevens WW II collector of 520/620 shotguns and agree with the comment that these 30" shotguns were for training our bomber gunners. Stevens was the "stepsister" of Win and Rem purchases for the gov't during the war but as so many weapons were needed for combat/training, thousands of Stevens were purchased including these guns. You got a great deal! And good for your eye. A Stevens collector would pay two times what you paid to include in a collection. I have the riot and trench in both models but not this guy and still keep my eye out for it in my area! Good shooting!

harperwv
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v35
Advanced Member

USA
12570 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2009 :  12:20:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We had riot versions of these shotguns in the Army for guard duty.
They were troublesome and wouldn't stay fixed, unlike any other then current small arms.
They were loaded and unloaded every two hours around the clock and fired occasionally for guard training. These guns wouldn't stand up to that much usage. I've witnessed guards waving these guns around dangerously in trying to clear jams. Ammunition was full length brass in OO Buck.
In my recollection, Ordnance bomb markings were applied to receivers of Army shotguns.
Yours has fancy wood for a Stevens.
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