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Jeff048
Starting Member

2 Posts

Posted - 08/07/2010 :  5:33:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Would like any information on a Jo-Lo-AR Sharp Shooter. All I have found on the net is the following:

On September 15, 1924 the Spanish Proof House tested the first Jo-Lo-Ar in .380 ACP caliber and issued a proof certificate for it separate from the Extractor Model Sharp-Shooter, which was also in production. These first production Jo-Lo-Ars bore the Spanish Patents of #68027, issued in 1920 for the Sharp-Shooter pistol itself, and #70235, issued on 1919 for the palanca. The Extractor Model Sharp-Shooter was also issued a patent , #70237 in 1924, to differentiate the Extractor Model Sharp-Shooter from the earlier Sharp-Shooter sans extractor. The strange thing is that all Jo-Lo-Ars were built using Extractor Model Sharp-Shooters, patent #70237, but were marked with the old Sharp-Shooter patent, #68027. Why, we may never know. If you do happen to find a genuine Jo-Lo-Ar with the Extractor Model patent number on the slide; hold on to it dearly, none are known to exist.
>
> Mine does of a patent number starting with 68027. Any information you could give would be helpful

mark christian
Administrator

Panama
19006 Posts

Posted - 08/07/2010 :  6:04:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Jo-LO-AR name came from the designer's name; Jose Lopez Arnaiz and I'll be the first to say that I know next to nothing about the history of these pistols, but I ahve seen them. If you have some photos of your pistol we'd be interested in seeing them.


For our members who don't know about these pistols: They were mid sized automatics which had no trigger guards and a pop up barrel, something like the one found on later Beretta's. They also had a very unusual cocking system through the use of a large lever on the right side of the frame. Think about a very big fold-down winter trigger on a military rifle and you'll get the picture. These were all straight blow back pistols and some of them were in heavy pistol calibers, much larger than is usually thought safe for blow back autos. The first series of pistols lacked any extractor and the spent case was simply blown out of the breech and ejected by chamber pressures. With a straight blow back pistol firing a 9mm Bergmann round this was pretty easy to do! Eventually an extractor was added to aid in ejecting small caliber rounds as well as allowing for a misfired round to be removed from the chamber.

Member rufe-snow is our small caliber European pistol expert so hopefully he will see this thread and give you some hard data on the pistol.
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rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15719 Posts

Posted - 08/07/2010 :  8:54:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My experience with them, is that they (Sharp Shooter's) aren't at all common.

The large version with the spur trigger and cocking lever, known as ( JO-LO-AR's), that Mark described, were sold as paramilitary pistols in South America. They were chambered for the 9mm Largo cartridge. A quantity were imported and sold as surplus here in the States during the 1970's. Because of this they are much more common then the smaller Sharp Shooter's.

Unfortunately the relative rarity of the Sharp Shooter's doesn't make them valuable. Demand is what drives value. Most collectors at this point in time aren't particularly interested in obscure Spanish automatics.

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Jeff048
Starting Member

2 Posts

Posted - 08/08/2010 :  12:38:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am out of town right now. When I return home I will post some pictures. The article I referenced was at 9mmlargo.com/joloar/index.htm and they don't have a contact page so I didn't know if it was even a legitimate site.

Even though the site says the 68027 is rare and to hold on to it, I didn't figure it's value would be very high. Most people I ask or email don't even know there is a Jo Lo pistol out there. I do like to know everything I can, including value, of all my guns. Thanks for the input.
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rufe-snow
Advanced Member

15719 Posts

Posted - 08/08/2010 :  12:59:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here are a couple of pictures I got off the net, of Jo-Lo-AR and Sharpshooter pistols. The large one with the spur trigger is the paramilitary pistol that was imported from South America in the 70's.
Both of them feature the movable barrels, like the small Beretta's have.











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mark christian
Administrator

Panama
19006 Posts

Posted - 08/08/2010 :  01:19:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The lower example is the only type that I have ever seen, and even the two examples I've witnesses were not in a condition as nice as the one in the photo. I could swear that the two I saw were in 9mm Bergman, but they could have been 9mm Largo. Interesting guns, but the world is filled with interesting guns and most of them are not worth much money. To be honest with you; even if you have the rarest of all known Jo-Lo-Ar pistols, I doubt that it would bring in a large amount of cash.

If you can swing some phitos I would really like to see them.

Edited by - mark christian on 08/08/2010 01:20:13 AM
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