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 Install bindings on skis
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Mr. Perfect
Advanced Member

49390 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  7:59:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you have ever installed bindings on skis, your input to this thread would be appreciated. Is it hard to do? Just drill and screw down, right?

"When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace." -Jesus

"Also he [David] bade them teach the children of Judah [the use of] the bow" -Samuel

"An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it." -Col. Jeff Cooper

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

Some will die in hot pursuit and fiery auto crashes
Some will die in hot pursuit while sifting through my ashes
Some will fall in love with life and drink it from a fountain
That is pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain

G1

shilowar
Advanced Member

USA
35592 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  8:01:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One of those things I would pay a ski shop to do. You got to deep and you've ruined the ski.
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merlinn
Senior Member

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  8:02:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Be sure to screw them to the top side of the skis!


"What we've got here is, failure to communicate."
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m88.358win
Advanced Member

USA
6209 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  8:07:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Go to a ski shop. A good one.
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oldWinchesterfan
Member

527 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  10:43:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by m88.358win

Go to a ski shop. A good one.




+1
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CaptFun
Administrator

USA
16192 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  11:12:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Like you, I am an engineer and always thought "I can do anything better than that dope smoking hippie in the ski shop". But then, I remembered that if I screwed it up, I don't have anybody to recover damages from....

That said I have not owned skis since I got 65 stitches from being hit while parked on the side of a trail at Park City by a gentleman coming from OUT OF BOUNDS back onto the trail. Only time I ever had to ride the meat wagon down (since it was a head wound). At least they let me ride sitting up and not in the sled.....

MrsFun has not let me go skiing by myself since....


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Dads3040
Advanced Member

USA
13153 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2017 :  11:46:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many years ago I used to mount the bindings to most of my skis.

It isn't terribly difficult. But it is also important to do it correctly.

Without a jig, it is best to use a drill press with a depth stop to get the holes perpendicular to the face of the ski. There used to be drilling templates that came with the bindings. I imagine there must be YouTube videos these days that would walk you through the layout/aligning ski & boot centerlines. And if you do punch one through, don't fret too much. This is why P-Tex was invented.

Also, spread some sort of glue in the drilled holes before you torque in the screws. Outdoor wood glue is what I used to use for my regular skis. I used epoxy for my racing and canyon skis. Not sure, but if I was still skiing, I bet Gorilla Glue would work very well.

Finally, don't be shy about tightening the screws. Get a bit that fits correctly, have the ski clamped to the table, and lean on the screwdriver. Those screw connections are going to be very important to you, and having screws loose on skis is not good. Do not ask me how I know this...

I did it because I was a snow junkie and was always buying and trading skis. Not sure if I would today, especially with new skis. I would sure check to see if DIY binding install voided the warranty or ???

The Object in Life is not to be with the Majority, but Rather to Avoid finding Oneself in the Ranks of the Insane. Marcus Aurelius

Edited by - Dads3040 on 11/14/2017 11:48:12 PM
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NeoBlackdog
Advanced Member

USA
9893 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  12:25:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Randy, take 'em in and have 'em put on. It doesn't cost much and will be worth your piece of mind.
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toad67
Advanced Member

USA
5628 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  01:38:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Perfect

If you have ever installed bindings on skis, your input to this thread would be appreciated. Is it hard to do? Just drill and screw down, right?



For being Mr. Perfect, you sure leave quite a bit of room for error there my friend..
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shilowar
Advanced Member

USA
35592 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  04:48:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hell if you can afford the cost of a lift ticket, you can afford the cost of having a professional install the bindings! One of the few things I miss about living up north was skiing.
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wpageabc
Advanced Member

USA
5032 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  06:28:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some kid working in the ski shop back room. Vs. the guy who has his legs at risk? Ski bindings are no big deal. If there is a template with your bindings. Follow the instructions and your good to go.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u99Q7pNAjvg
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Flying Clay Disk
Advanced Member

USA
31020 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  08:18:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was a ski instructor for about 14 years, and always had my bindings done professionally by techs certified on that particular binding.

Mounting a binding incorrectly probably poses a larger risk to the ski than it does to you for injury. The bigger issue though (and this is an injury issue) is adjustment to the proper release specs for your boot size, weight and skiing ability level. And this takes special tools and should never be attempted without them.

So, if you're going to have to take your skis in to be adjusted anyway, why not just go ahead and have them mount the bindings too while they're at it?

With the outrageous price of skis and bindings these days, and the new materials like carbon fiber and polymers, why risk jacking up a ski? At least if they screw it up, they get to replace the ski (at no cost to you).

edit...one of the other things is measurement of tolerances under the boot in the binding, and the pressure specs on the teflon release pad. Unlikely you'd have the tools for that also. Plus, if the bindings need shimmed, and you've already got them glued and screwed down...you're screwed.

FCD

"Fortes et liber"


Edited by - Flying Clay Disk on 11/15/2017 08:22:13 AM
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Mr. Perfect
Advanced Member

49390 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  12:25:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Flying Clay Disk

I was a ski instructor for about 14 years, and always had my bindings done professionally by techs certified on that particular binding.

Mounting a binding incorrectly probably poses a larger risk to the ski than it does to you for injury. The bigger issue though (and this is an injury issue) is adjustment to the proper release specs for your boot size, weight and skiing ability level. And this takes special tools and should never be attempted without them.

So, if you're going to have to take your skis in to be adjusted anyway, why not just go ahead and have them mount the bindings too while they're at it?

With the outrageous price of skis and bindings these days, and the new materials like carbon fiber and polymers, why risk jacking up a ski? At least if they screw it up, they get to replace the ski (at no cost to you).

edit...one of the other things is measurement of tolerances under the boot in the binding, and the pressure specs on the teflon release pad. Unlikely you'd have the tools for that also. Plus, if the bindings need shimmed, and you've already got them glued and screwed down...you're screwed.


I've been adjusting the binding release for years now. It doesn't take special tools, just a regular philips head screw driver and there are adjustment charts available online. That part is not terribly hard, actually. (ETA:I'm thinking that it used to be harder on older style bindings, these days, it's all pretty easy).

I do have a drill press, so likely I will go that route. Thanks for the tips guys!

"When a strong man armed keepeth his palace, his goods are in peace." -Jesus

"Also he [David] bade them teach the children of Judah [the use of] the bow" -Samuel

"An unarmed man can only flee from evil, and evil is not overcome by fleeing from it." -Col. Jeff Cooper

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

Some will die in hot pursuit and fiery auto crashes
Some will die in hot pursuit while sifting through my ashes
Some will fall in love with life and drink it from a fountain
That is pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain

G1

Edited by - Mr. Perfect on 11/15/2017 12:39:53 PM
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asop
Advanced Member

4680 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2017 :  8:23:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
YES-Done it 20+ times. Just do it.
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Flying Clay Disk
Advanced Member

USA
31020 Posts

Posted - 11/16/2017 :  06:39:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Perfect

quote:
Originally posted by Flying Clay Disk

I was a ski instructor for about 14 years, and always had my bindings done professionally by techs certified on that particular binding.

Mounting a binding incorrectly probably poses a larger risk to the ski than it does to you for injury. The bigger issue though (and this is an injury issue) is adjustment to the proper release specs for your boot size, weight and skiing ability level. And this takes special tools and should never be attempted without them.

So, if you're going to have to take your skis in to be adjusted anyway, why not just go ahead and have them mount the bindings too while they're at it?

With the outrageous price of skis and bindings these days, and the new materials like carbon fiber and polymers, why risk jacking up a ski? At least if they screw it up, they get to replace the ski (at no cost to you).

edit...one of the other things is measurement of tolerances under the boot in the binding, and the pressure specs on the teflon release pad. Unlikely you'd have the tools for that also. Plus, if the bindings need shimmed, and you've already got them glued and screwed down...you're screwed.


I've been adjusting the binding release for years now. It doesn't take special tools, just a regular philips head screw driver and there are adjustment charts available online. That part is not terribly hard, actually. (ETA:I'm thinking that it used to be harder on older style bindings, these days, it's all pretty easy).




The actual 'adjustment' has always been pretty straight forward with a minimal amount of tools, as you say. It's the testing of the release(s) which required the special tools. If you adjust them without testing them afterwards you're trusting the manufacturer got the binding built exactly to spec. Not something I was willing to bet my knees on.

To each his own though.


FCD

"Fortes et liber"

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