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 BEST WAY TO FRESHING OLD STOCKS
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DAMMITDON
New Member

USA
96 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  3:12:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
what is the best way clean up old rifles STOCKS used by invaders from the NORTH

DAMMITDON

Wease01
Junior Member

USA
237 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  3:22:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't know anything about old stocks used by northern invaders but if it's a utilitarian stock and not a high end one, I coat them with a finish stripper to get them down to bare wood. Then I steam 'em to get the dents out and then lightly sand the hairs off with fine grit. Then rub them down with Birchwood Casey Tru Oil. Several coats.
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navc130
Member

516 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  4:12:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You said clean up, not refinish, right? I wash with soap and warm water, using a small brush to get into recesses. This will leave them dull looking. Then apply a thin coat of Linseed Oil, Spar Varnish, Tru Oil, etc., wood finish. Lemon Oil furniture polish will make the wood shine (a gun show trick). If you don't want to use soap and water, wipe it down with paint thinner. Use Acetone or warm heat to remove oil from oil soaked wood. These methods have done nothing to remove dents, scratches, chips, etc., only to clean the wood and add a little wood finish to what was originally varnish or linseed oil. If it is a genuine antique be very careful and thoughtful what you do to it. American collectors are very picky and quick to point out that "it's not original." Sometimes it is just better to leave it alone. That said, I almost always wash my old stocks (muzzle loaders) and rub in a little finish of some kind.

Edited by - navc130 on 11/02/2017 8:53:08 PM
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charliemeyer007
Advanced Member

USA
5335 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  4:12:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think you will get more useful answers if you provide more information in your question.

Are you trying to repair a deep scratch/gouge or other limited damage area and keep the rest of the original finish or a total make over?
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62fuelie
Member

USA
957 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  4:46:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Many collectors of items from the age of the War of Northern Aggression prefer that the honest grit and grime of the age be preserved, as long as it doesn't present a threat to the structural integrity of the piece. A light surface cleaning with something mild like Kelly's liquid soap and a soft cloth followed by a light application of oil to the metal surfaces would be all that I would do.

B
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perry shooter
Advanced Member

17214 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  5:20:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
my go to item for doing what I think will give you the best results is a product called ballistol
it will not harm wood metal or leather non toxic great stuff

r
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SP45
Senior Member

1801 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  6:27:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For wood. Try Howards Restore A Finish. Made for antique furniture.
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mmppres
Senior Member

1794 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2017 :  7:17:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with perryshooter its good for leather too
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Okie743
Senior Member

USA
1416 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2017 :  11:07:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wease01

I don't know anything about old stocks used by northern invaders but if it's a utilitarian stock and not a high end one, I coat them with a finish stripper to get them down to bare wood. Then I steam 'em to get the dents out and then lightly sand the hairs off with fine grit. Then rub them down with Birchwood Casey Tru Oil. Several coats.



get the $16 Birchwood Caseys kit and read the instructions twice before starting but forget the part about using steel wool between coats.

Go to a Auto supply and get a sheet of 800-1200 wert dry sandpaper and use this to apply the additional coats of tru-oil over the dry coats. Just wet the extra find wet dry sandpaper and stock with tru oil and use the sandpaper to lightly apply the additional coats. You can just use your fingers with rubber gloves to apply the first coat.
the wet dry will smooth the dry coat at the same time it's applying the additional coats. The sheen conditioner is used to reduce the SHINE if you want non gloss finish. Use the sheen conditioner with care because it will reduce the gloss fast.

What is nice about tru-oil is you can always go back later and rework a scratch to the finish without re-doing the whole stock.

Another hint. Store the tru-oil bottle upside down and the dried skim layer will be at the bottom instead of at the top.

This will take a week to get a finished stock once to start applying because it should dry for at least 24 hours between coats of tru-oil.

Ronnid Milsap can use this kit with good results and Bubba also.

I do not re-finish with tru-oil right before Deer hunting season due to the odor taking couple months to leave the finish.

Edited by - Okie743 on 11/06/2017 11:11:08 AM
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