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Foundation Repair...Aftermath

nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 36,026 ******
edited August 2004 in General Discussion
Six of the nine piers went inside the house. That meant moving furniture and taking up carpet. Fortunately, every place a pier was needed was covered in carpet. I would have been a little more aggravated if we had to punch a big hole in my ceramic tile.

We had to spend two nights sleeping on a mattress on the floor in a spare bedroom. Sort of like camping out. Bad thing is if I wake up and have to go to the bathroom, the familiar path there and back is different now, so I am apt to bump into something.

Anyway, the guys left yesterday, and Dawnie had to work today, so it was up to me and Travis to put everything back. Had a carpet pro come and put the carpet down, but we did all the furniture, the gun safe, and general cleanup. The crew cleaned up so-so, but not good enough to live in.

This makes twice I have had this done. I hope to do it never again.

The doors fit now, anyway.

Now for the roof.



SIG pistol armorer/FFL Dealer/Full time Peace Officer, Moderator of General Discussion Board on Gunbroker. Visit www.gunbroker.com the best gun auction site on the Net! Email gpd035@sbcglobal.net

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    bigdaddyjuniorbigdaddyjunior Member Posts: 11,233
    edited November -1
    I thought Texas soil conditions required a slab foundation. Kind of an "H" shape becuase of the lack of hardplate or bedrock.

    040103cowboy_shooting_one_gun_md_clr_prv.gifBig Daddy my heros have always been cowboys,they still are it seems
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    nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 36,026 ******
    edited November -1
    It is a slab foundation. Slab foundations suck on black clay. Black clay will move and expand and contract, wreaking all manner of havoc.

    The house is over 25 years old, and built in an unincorporated area, so building codes may or may not apply. Slabs do have beams dug under them, and steel reinforcement, but it has been only recently that builders are incorporating drilled piers under the slab. IF the piers go deep enough, they can stabilize the slab.

    I would rather have a pier & beam foundation, but most houses around here have slabs since it is fast and cheap. With pier and beam, the floor is not in contact with the ground, and so a vapor barrier and proper insulation can be installed. Also, you can get under the house to deal with plumbing problems. With a slab, plumbing problems are BIG problems.

    The ground will still move under a pier & beam foundation, but when it does, any semi-handy homeowner with some jacks and a level can make adjustments with shims. He CAN call the high-priced foundation repair company, but he doesn't have to.

    I had a "builder" tell me once that the reason that all builders use slab foundations is that they can't get decent heavy lumber suitable for building a floor anymore. I said, "So that pretty much rules out building a two-story house?" All I got was a dumb look and silence.


    SIG pistol armorer/FFL Dealer/Full time Peace Officer, Moderator of General Discussion Board on Gunbroker. Visit www.gunbroker.com the best gun auction site on the Net! Email gpd035@sbcglobal.net
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    bsallybsally Member Posts: 3,165
    edited November -1
    quote: had a "builder" tell me once that the reason that all builders use slab foundations is that they can't get decent heavy lumber suitable for building a floor anymore.

    That's gotta be the dumbest thing I have heard in a good while. Trees are weaker now-adays? With the laminated beams out in the last decade or so, the opposite is the truth.

    SALLY
    Committee member-Ducks Unlimited
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    bobskibobski Member Posts: 17,868 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    they can get it, but the transporation costs are what nail you. some areas of the country dont grow trees as big as others. soil, water, weather conditions, etc... all play an important role in making the best wood for a job. rarer it is, the more you pay. my 100 year old house is down 3/4" in the middle. its been checked, but in order to level it, i'd crack every wall and loose every door jamb and door. people shaved them so much to make em clear the floor, the doors arent square! heck, good set of curtains and carpets fixes a load of house woes![:D]
    Retired Naval Aviation
    Former Member U.S. Navy Shooting Team
    Former NSSA All American
    Navy Distinguished Pistol Shot
    MO, CT, VA.
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