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Advice needed on a career choice!!

sabb0007sabb0007 Member Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭
edited September 2005 in General Discussion
This is my fifth year of college at the university of MN. I will graduate in may with a B.S. in biology and a B.A. in psychology. I have two career paths that I am considering. I am going to apply to Argosy University and try to get into their clinical psychology Psy.D. program, it's 4 years of school and one year of internship. I have a pretty good chance of getting in. If I don't get in, I am probably going to join the military and go to Officer Candidate School. Even if I get in to Argosy I still might join the military. I want to know which branch of the military is the best for me. I am interested in Military Intelligence. I want to be able to move up in the ranks and some day be a general in the army for instance.

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    CJ7nvrstkCJ7nvrstk Member Posts: 678 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The military can be a grea thing for some people, though it is not for all. It has worked well for me. [;)]

    All that is required for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.
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    sabb0007sabb0007 Member Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What would you do if you were in my position and what branch would you join? And why?
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    FrogbertFrogbert Member Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The United States Navy is the absolute tops for those interested in a career in intelligence. Ever heard of ONI?

    Frog.

    RiBBButt...You can't rollerskate in a buffalo herd, but you can be happy if you've a mind to. -Roger Miller
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    MN HunterMN Hunter Member Posts: 2,299 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    sabb - i use to go to the U before my pre-marine corps days. the farmhouse brings back many fond memories [xx(][xx(][xx(]

    if you get some free time, either talk to one of the marines (im partial sorry) at the U...i can get you their info if you would like, or go down by the federal building (over by snelling) and you will find the recruiting office for officers.....best of luck.

    BTW...i can help you on the usmc side of the house...phone #'s, who to talk to, who not to talk to, etc. etc.

    24_emblem.jpg


    "Not many like us, in fact very few, and most of them are dead" LtCol Pratt - USMC
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    gap1916gap1916 Member Posts: 4,977
    edited November -1
    If you plan on stying in the psych field the navy or air force would be my plan A & B. The mission of the Marine Corp would not match your chosen profession. My 2 cents [8D]

    Greg
    Former Marine
    2nd A N G L I C O
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    JorgeJorge Member Posts: 10,656 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'd go for the PsyD program and then, and only then, OCS.
    [8D][8D][8D]
    Been there, done that!
    United States Navy, 1979-1991.



    2002-05-21-shark.jpg

    "A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity."
    Sigmund Freud, "General Introduction to Psychoanalysis".
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    WarbirdsWarbirds Member Posts: 16,877 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sound like a pretty smart guy, go to grad school.
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    furhollerfurholler Member Posts: 780 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Isn't "military intelligence" an oxymoron?[:D]

    "Bad men cannot make good citizens. It is when a people forget God that tyrants forge their chains...No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue: and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles."-Patrick Henry
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    SilverkingSilverking Member Posts: 331 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Join the Coast Guard. I enlisted and the USCG paid for me to finish college while on active duty. (Graduated distance ed while TAD in GITMO in the summmer of '99 - but enough about me.

    Put your brains to use and there are many scientific and psychological applications for a young USCG Officer. Marine Science and Drug Interdiction beats the crap out of slowing down lead. The USCG will pay for you to get as much education as you desire. God knows the other branches are crucial to the American way of life - but for me the USCG was great.

    Even have some nice photos of me posing with 20 million in cocaine as a decent trophy!
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    mpolansmpolans Member Posts: 1,752 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you're dead set on a career in intelligence, why not CIA or any of the other non-military intelligence organizations?
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    ZERODINZERODIN Member Posts: 6,338
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by mpolans
    If you're dead set on a career in intelligence, why not CIA or any of the other non-military intelligence organizations?

    Because all the fun jobs require you to have been active-duty military before you apply. [8D]
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    Grunt2Grunt2 Member Posts: 2,525 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Five years of college and your still not sure what to do?
    WHat did your mommy tell you to do?

    "No arsenal, or no weapon in the arsenals of the world, is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women.
    - Ronald Reagan
    Retired LEO
    Combat Vet VN
    D.A.V Life Member
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    warriorsfanwarriorsfan Member Posts: 1,061 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    No offense, but unless you speak Arabic or have some other type of stellar credentials, you will find it near impossible to become an Intelligence officer. Intelligence is VERY COMPETITIVE, in fact, it is the most sought after field next to being an aviator when it comes to potential officers. The Navy and Army and AF gets LOTS of applications from college grads just like you for precious few OCS Intel slots. Now if you wanted to do Infantry in the Army or Marines, or Surface Warfare or Supply Corps for the Navy, you would have no problem

    But to do Intel, it would be to your benefit to get that PsyD and THEN apply. Like I said, having 2 Bachelor's degrees simply won't cut it, not unless you are graduating from Harvard, or unless you speak fluent Farsi or Arabic, or have prior enlisted service. You will be competing against guys with Master's degrees from presitigous universities for those Intel slots, so go to grad school first.

    And I hate to burst your bubble, but very few flag officers got commissioned through OCS. Generals and Admirals almost always come from the Military Academies, the rest through ROTC. Some of the one-stars and two-stars in the staff corps probably went to OCS or OIS, but this would be for people like doctors and lawyers, not line officers. Don't go into OCS thinking you will be a General 20 years from now, because you won't. If you want to be a general, go apply to West Point.
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    sabb0007sabb0007 Member Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't think I would want to go to grad school and then back to OCS, it is just one or the other. It sounds like intel might be a question mark, at least for advancing far into the ranks. What is the best way for me to rise high in the ranks without going to grad school.
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    sabb0007sabb0007 Member Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Also, does anyone know a military intelligence officer that I could email or talk to? If not, I'll see if I can get me recruiter to find someone for me to talk to. I just want to verify that Intelligence would probably not be the smartest move for me if I want to rise high in the ranks.
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    beachmaster73beachmaster73 Member Posts: 3,011 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well I spent 23 years in the Navy and Commanded Beachmaster Unit One. I wanted to add my two cents but Warriorsfan said it as well as I could and possibly far better!!!! Intell is not a great career move if you want to make flag.PERIOD Most intel flag officers come from the main warfare specialties before they tranfer to intel. An OCS weanie is on the bottom of the food chain unless he has some exceptional language skills. You might make it to major/lieutenant commander by the end of your career but probably not much more than that if that. If you are fluent in Mandarin, Cantonese, Arabic, and German....you are a solid candidate for O-6 in the intel community. With those beforementioned skills and supreme political savoy you might just make the flag cut. Otherwise plan on filling out harborchart depths and fueling facility capabilities on places like Bandoon Priok(a truely unappreciated but necessary job) for your career. Beach
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    bobskibobski Member Posts: 17,866 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "or would rather swing on a star, carry moon beams home in a jar.........or would you rather be a pig?"

    be a SEAL. theyll give commissions to any knukleheads willing to die for it.

    former air operations officer SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team 2. former navy skeet team, former navy rifle/pistol team member. co-owner skeetmaster tubes inc.. owner/operator professional shooting instruction. NRA certified instructor.
    Retired Naval Aviation
    Former Member U.S. Navy Shooting Team
    Former NSSA All American
    Navy Distinguished Pistol Shot
    MO, CT, VA.
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    SperrySperry Member Posts: 5,006 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The contractors that make thje most money can bid on certain jobs if they are:

    female
    minority
    handicapped


    Get the operation, tint the skin, and * the "non-dominant" arm.

    You'll be a millionare many times over in five years.

    =========== J O K I N G -- A S I D E =============

    I'd go for OCS, and start cramming in five languages [besides military-speak].
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    sabb0007sabb0007 Member Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What about if I go in as an Infantry Officer, is there any chance there?
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    n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    Of the hundreds of thousands of officers that went through the Army, very Few attained the Rank Of General.. most peak out at Lt. Col, or Col.. a lot more peak out at Major.. you only need one General for about every 200,000 troops. need more Lts and capts, after that most officers become staff..

    "when you see the enemy, you attack and shoot him down, anything less is just bull shi*
    Baron Von Richthofen (RED BARON)

    yo-yo.gifsmilie_flagge13.gifmittelgr124.gif
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    tacking1tacking1 Member Posts: 3,844
    edited November -1
    sabb0007

    All these military guys will advise you well...I'll let them deal with the specifics.

    What I will tell you is to go into one of the branches ofv military service.

    I passed on going to OCS 'cause I fell in love right out of college and at 42 NOT A DAY PASSES THAT I DON'T REGRET THAT DECISION!!!!

    Listen to me, please.

    You want to call me and talk, please do....email me and I send you my #

    Thomas

    ***Father, Husband, and all around Nice Guy***
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    warriorsfanwarriorsfan Member Posts: 1,061 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Promotions up through the rank of Major (or Lt. Commander in the Navy) are pretty much automatic, provided you have a good record as an officer and the requisite number of years at your current rank. After that, promotions get very competitive. When the promotion board takes a look at you for promotion from O-4 to O-5, or O-5 to O-6, then things like how many medals and commendations you have earned, combat experience, overseas service, etc will play a big role in who ends up with a set of Eagles on their shoulders, and who retires as a Lt Col or Commander. For this, infantry would be your best bet. It's your best bet if your goal is simply to attain the highest rank you can. Fields like Intel and Cryptology and not good areas to go into if you want to become a senior officer. But honestly, simply attaining the highest rank you can shouldn't be your goal going into this.

    Intel and Crypto are good fields if you want to serve your country for a few years and then go join the FBI or the CIA, if you are lucky to land an Intel spot that is. I heard a story about a guy with a degree from Harvard getting turned down for Navy Intel (although he might have had a mediocre GPA and no exracurriculars or leadership experience).

    But that shouldn't deter you. If you want to do Intel, then talk to a recruiter. The worst that can happen is that you apply and do not get it. You can always do something to improve your chances (like getting a masters's degree, job experience, etc) and then reapply again a year later if you are serious about it. Your recruiter should be able to tell you how competitive you are, but I warn you, there are a lot of officer recruiters out there who simply don't know what the hell they are talking about or are just plain incompetent. I have heard plenty of horror stories of things like lost applications, etc. My advice, do your research, don't take everything your recruiter says at face value, and talk to some REAL Intel officers. There are forums on the Internet where you can talk to real military officers and get the real information straight from the source. I can't stress enough how important it is to talk to some real officers before you sign on the dotted line, it isn't their job to recruit you, they will tell it like it is.
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    jltrentjltrent Member Posts: 9,254 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I work with a lot of ex-military people who are pretty smart and some of the best * kissers I have ever seen. They also have a degree and didn't make it very far up the ladder.
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