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Shameless M1 plug WWII Springfield

mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
edited October 2010 in General Discussion
I bought this very late WWII Springfield from the CMP last year and since I just have too many M1s laying around, it has to go. This is a CMP Service Grade, which is the CMPs highest grade for "normal", or non collector M1s, and it is in very nice shape with very good looking USGI wood. The barrel is in great shape so this one will be a fine shooter in addition to being a piece of WWII history. If a forum member buys it I will toss in a decent web sling at no cost.
http://www.GunBroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=156864417

Comments

  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    My M1 luck has been pretty good this month and I managed to pick up another nice WWII Springfield:

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=225631237

    This is a CMP rifle that I just bought at an estate sale and it is in very nice shape, especially the barrel, which is in excellent condition. Uncle Sam was rebuilding over 100,000 M1s per year between WWII and the Korean War, giving them fresh barrels and updating and replacing any worn parts and this looks to be one of them. If you have been looking for a nice WWII M1 then this is worth consideration.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    I am handling the sale of a well used CMP M1 Garand that was inherited by a neighbor and she has no interest in it at all. I want to be specific in that this is NOT one of my own M1s, it is someone's rifle being sold by me strictly as a courtesy. This is a Rack Grade rifle and that grade is rougher than the other grades so don't expect a dazzling piece of M1 eye candy which I sometimes offer up.

    I'm not feeling well tonight (no Don, I am not drunk) so I'll be logging out early and won't be able to answer questions until Monday morning (late). I have the rifle here with me so all questions can be answered. I think that the opening bid is very far for a complete CMP rifle (a welded up and non functional CMP drill rifle costs only $100 less) so if you are looking at a low cost entry M1, which just happens to be a WWII example with a lot of correct parts) then any help you can give the lady in finding is a new home will be appreciated.

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=198302612
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    I just listed a decent looking WWII Springfield M1 which I think would be prefect for an entry level M1 buyer or someone who wanted a Garand but is on a tight budget. It is also getting tougher to find WWII M1s and some reenactment groups mandate the use of nothing but M1s with WWII serial numbers. This is a good solid M1, nothing fancy and a true mix-master (mixed WWII and post war parts), but it should get the job done and since it is no safe queen, you won't mind dragging it around in the field all day. If a forum member buys it I'll toss in a serviceable web sling. Please take a look at it.

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=144314525
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    I have an interesting M1 up on auction:
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=312756499

    This is a WWII era Springfield which was on loan to Denmark and then returned to the United States and the CMP. After the end of WWII Uncle Sam loaned hundreds of thousands of M1 rifle to our allies, including Denmark where they served for many years. Replacement parts were not sent in huge numbers so the Danes bought many parts from Beretta, which was licensed to produce the M1 and support parts for NATO and this rifle has quite a few Italian made parts installed. In the late 1990s these Danish rifles were returned to the United States and while the CMP was supposed to have been sold out them for many years it seems that there are a few still floating around. Think of it as an WWII M1 with an Italian flavor. It is in good shape with a decent barrel and if you want something a bit out of the ordinary then this one is worth a look. As usual; if a forum member buys it I will toss in a free web sling.

    Thanks for looking.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    I picked up another very nice WWII era rebuild last week which I have listed this evening:

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=299958547

    Unlike the previous rifle, which was a near mint overhaul and likely came right out of deep storage in some depot, this one was rebuilt and then saw at least some use before it was shipped to the CMP. The birch stock set on this rifle really stands out and if you prefer birch to walnut then you will surely like how it presents. A collector bought the last rifle and told me that he had no intention of shooting it but this M1 just screams out to be taken to the range and enjoy.

    This is an M1 which I would be buying if I were looking for a very nice WWII era M1 to take to the range or just for admiring and not spending a fortune on a correct WWII collector rifle.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    I made a purchase of a few M1s last week and one of them is a pretty good looking mid WWII era rifle which still has it's original barrel.


    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=295399448

    Since WWII .30-06 ammo used corrosive primers most M1s from that time period have had their barrels changed (often more than once) and it is not common to find the original barrel with the receiver. This is not fancy collector piece but a good honest WWII rile which can be taken out to the range, fired and enjoyed. With a production date of June, 1943 this rifle came off the line near the peak of M1 production and probably left Springfield Armory for some overseas destination very quickly. Lots of folks love WWII M1s because of their combat history (WWII and Korea) and this one is worth a look for anyone interested in a rifle which most likely "went there and made it back".
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 23,010 ******
    edited November -1
    This is an exceptionally nice CMP Service Grade which I picked up in a private purchase just a couple of weeks ago:

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=297756414

    The original buyer ordered it from the CMP and then waited patently for it to arrive, but sadly by the time it showed up he had suffered an unfortunate financial setback and could not justify keeping it. The rifle itself appears to be a WWII rebuild right out of a depot which went into storage and then ended up at the CMP. The barrel looks factory fresh and the rifle was probably never fired after it was rebuilt. These M1 rebuilds are excellent shooting rifles and this one has the added attraction of a WWII era receiver. I don't get a chance to offer M1s like this one very often because most CMP buyers, after waiting weeks to months for their rifle to arrive, hold onto them. I have all of the papers and the CMP hard case with teh rifle. The CMP Certificate of Authenticity is a photocopy because the original buyer did not want his name known.

    If you are looking for a very special M1 then this one bears consideration.
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    still looks decent enough.

    Good luck with it for your friend, MC.

    That is a nice thing for you to do.
  • xxx97xxx97 Member Posts: 5,721
    edited November -1
    pics looks nice...
  • Horse Plains DrifterHorse Plains Drifter Member Posts: 35,724 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well, It looks pretty fine to me Mark.
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