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Perspectives - Young vs Old...

Colt SuperColt Super Member Posts: 31,007
edited May 2007 in General Discussion
Looking at the two NASCAR related threads led me to wonder about the age ranges of forum members.

I was born in 1944, and have seen a lot of changes, both to our society and to our technology (cause and effect??).

How about telling me your ages ??

Doug

Comments

  • Mk 19Mk 19 Member Posts: 8,170
    edited November -1
    born in 73, and I have seen a bunch of changes also
  • brier-49brier-49 Member Posts: 6,345 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Born in 1949, biggest change I have seen is in politics. The Republicans are just like the DEmocrats were in the 50's and early 60's and the Democrats are Almost totally Communist.
  • tobefreetobefree Member Posts: 7,401
    edited November -1
    Well if you are young you missed all the best of Nascar (actually all racing) It was so mch better circa 1900-1979.
    Some of the small tracks still try to capture that old time excitement like Shady Bowl in Degraff Ohio. But Nascar to me is just about as exciting as watching grass grow....

    http://www.shadybowl.com/schedule/
  • fishermanbenfishermanben Member Posts: 15,370
    edited November -1
    1979

    27 y/o

    Ben
  • spryorspryor Member Posts: 9,155
    edited November -1
    49yrs old, and would much rather watch a good drag race.[:)][:)]
  • TopkickTopkick Member Posts: 4,449
    edited November -1
    I'm a 1960 model myself.
    Worn tires, loose belts.

    I like "old" Nascar though.
  • Sig220_Ruger77Sig220_Ruger77 Member Posts: 12,729 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
    edited November -1
    Born in 1941 the year Pearl Harbor was attacked. I was safe back in Northern Indiana.

    I remember going to a NASCAR race down in Fort Wayne, IN in 1957 and watching "Fireball Roberts" and "Curtis Turner" race around the track. At least I think it was called NASCAR, might have just been called stock car racing in those days.
  • Old-ColtsOld-Colts Member Posts: 22,482 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Born in 1945. Yes, there have been may changes/advances since then!

    If you can't feel the music; it's only pink noise!

  • LOKO383LOKO383 Member Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    1963 here 44yrs old, my grandfather raced stock cars in the 50s and 60s and kept a great scrap book of actual newspaper clippings from all over the east and south i can make copies and send them to you if your interested like the day fireball roberts died and and too many other ones to mention, shoot me a email if ya want any, LOKO [:D]
  • bamafanbamafan Member Posts: 4,011
    edited November -1
    Born in 1977. I'll be the big 30 this year. YIKES! In my opinion, Nascar is for people that don't have nothing else better to do. Like fishing, hunting, shooting....
  • tomahawktomahawk Member Posts: 11,826
    edited November -1
    49yrs. 6'4" 320lbs of rompin stompin romance[:D]
  • jbc23060jbc23060 Member Posts: 499 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm a product of 1955. It certainly has been interesting living through the pase 51.75 years. I don't really believe the bulk of people have changed all that much; at least not when you talk with them 1-1.

    We may exhibit more change and more of a 'me first' attitude when we get into the voting booth, though. I think the 'fringes' of society are a bit more extreme, but I really believe that much of our perception, about the changes, stem from the fact that we're bombarded with the bad news, day in and day out. '24 hour news' and 'news as entertainment' are a large part of what is eroding our collective psyche. Just some of my observations.
  • joeaf1911a1joeaf1911a1 Member Posts: 3,340
    edited November -1
    Born in 1926. Yes a lot of changes. Some good,most bad. Morals on the decline, gun laws still gowing worse, politicians stealing more than the approved 10 percent (by far), people not bothering to work for a living but expecting a handout, crime way up, a persons "word" meaning nothing in many cases, patriotism way down, schools teaching everything but what they should be teaching. Yes, progress I guess. If one wishes to call it that. I call it moral and Country decay. I am damn glad I lived when I did even with the big depression of '29 and fighting in the ETO in WW 2. I feel it made all of us stronger. But those days for most of us are gone but for few of this generation now. My hat is off for these few who felt as we did back then.
  • spasmcreekspasmcreek Member Posts: 38,925
    edited November -1
    joeaf1911a1 said it EXACTLY right
  • Colt SuperColt Super Member Posts: 31,007
    edited November -1
    spasmcreek - How old are you, please ??

    Doug
  • kristovkristov Member Posts: 6,633
    edited November -1
    I was born in 1955. Since my own parents were not natives of the USA, immigarting here less than a year before I was born, I don't have any preconceived notions of how wonderful it must have been in the United States prior to it's "going downhill". What I do see is more people getting a higher level of education than ever before, a very high standard of living and much more equality for women and minorites than ever existed back in the good old days. Back before the early 1960's the USA appeared to be more of a country club for white christian males instead the melting pot with liberty and justice for all that it was made out to be.
  • D1D1 Member Posts: 11,412
    edited November -1
    1961 model, built for comfort, not speed. I grew up watching NASCAR with my Daddy. The old NASCAR to me is Cale Yarborough, David Pearson, Richard Petty.... I like watching it now with all the high tech stuff. Living here in SC it was almost sacreligious not watch or be in tune with it then. I loved going to Daytona, Rockingham and Charlotte with him. We never went to Darlington together.

    But I was there when this happened. Daddy and I were sitting in the bleachers on the back stretch. Most of it happened right in front of us. I bet him Petty was going to win before we left home and he said Cale Yarborough.


    1979: Petty winds up in 'fist' place
    By Mark Aumann, Turner Sports Interactive January 23, 2003
    11:01 AM EST (1601 GMT)
    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- In one of the strangest races in Daytona 500 history, the wildest moment turned out to be an unscheduled tag-team wrestling match.

    As a nationwide television audience witnessed the first live flag-to-flag coverage of a 500-mile race, Cale Yarborough and Donnie Allison smashed into each other while going for the lead on the final lap. When Bobby Allison stopped to survey the damage, the three began swinging fists and helmets at each other, leaving a surprised Richard Petty to cross the finish line the victor, snapping a winless streak of 45 races.

    It was almost inevitable that Yarborough and the Allisons would be involved in a race-ending incident, because that's how they started their day, once a chilly morning rain ended.

    On lap 32, Donnie Allison lost control and forced Yarborough and Bobby Allison to take evasive action, as all three cars spun through the muck and the mire on the backstretch infield.

    Forced to pit to repair his waterlogged car, Yarbrough ended up losing four laps to the leaders. But he used a series of cautions to his advantage -- including making up three laps in a 35-lap span -- to get back on the lead lap for the final sprint to the finish.

    Chasing the Allisons -- leader Donnie and the lapped car of Bobby -- but a half-lap ahead of Petty, Darrell Waltrip and A.J. Foyt, Yarborough made his move on the final lap, diving below Donnie's car in Turn 1. Allison ran Yarborough down to the apron, where the two Oldsmobiles made contact, then slid up the embankment to hit the outside wall before spinning back into the infield.


    Richard Petty celebrates his victory in the 1979 Daytona 500. Credit: Daytona Racing Archives.
    All three cars came to a stop in the grass, where the melee ensued. Helmets and racing gloves became weapons as the Allisons and Yarborough kicked and clawed in the mud.

    "It's the worst thing I've ever seen in racing," Yarborough said. "Bobby waited on us so he could block me off. It was evident. The films will show it. I had him beat. I knew how to win the race.

    "They double-teamed me. My left wheels were over in the dirt, and Donnie knocked me over in the dirt further. He carried me on into the grass. I started spinning and Donnie started spinning.

    "Donnie denied doing it. Bobby pulled up over there, and I asked him why he did it. He bowed up, and I swung at him. It was the worst thing I've ever seen in racing."

    To no one's surprise, the Allisons saw things a little differently.

    "Naw, I didn't block them," Bobby Allison said. "I wasn't even close. I rode up there after the race was over to make sure they were both OK."

    "I don't think Bobby slowed down, and Bobby didn't move anywhere," Donnie Allison concurred. "Cale had made up his mind he would pass me low, and I had made up my mind he was gonna have to pass me high. I had already decided if he was going to pass, it was going to be on the outside.

    "When he tried to pass me low, he went off the track. He spun and hit me. I feel like I had to keep from getting knocked out, and I didn't do that.

    "When Bobby came over to find out if we were all right, Cale went over and punched Bobby through the screen. Then he came at me and started calling me names."

    Petty, who had been running a distant third, suddenly found himself in the lead with less than two miles to go. Waltrip made a desperation move to the apron of the track in the tri-oval, but Petty stayed in front by a car length at the line.

    "I had hold of my steering wheel, and I was going to cut it left if Darrell got any closer," Petty said.

    Petty, who had offseason surgery to remove 40 percent of his stomach, was racing against the advice of his doctor.

    "I'm on top of the world," he said. "The weathe rgot cooler, and it was not an exhausting race. From a mental standpoint, however, it was rough. I thought it was the worst race I've ever been in, the way the cars were jumping around on the track."

    Buddy Baker's Daytona jinx continued. Baker, who sat on the pole with a record speed of 196.049 mph, was finished by lap 38 with ignition problems.

    "That just beats all I've ever seen," Baker said. "If there was ever a perfect race car, that was it. I'm a disappointed man right now."

    Dale Earnhardt led 10 laps and finished eighth in his first 500, while Terry Labonte was 16th and Geoff Bodine 29th.


    1979 Daytona 500 Top 10
    1. Richard Petty

    2. Darrell Waltrip

    3. A.J. Foyt

    4. Donnie Allison

    5. Cale Yarborough

    6. Tighe Scott

    7. Chuck Bown

    8. Dale Earnhardt

    9. Coo Coo Marlin

    10. Frank Warren
  • oldgunneroldgunner Member Posts: 2,466 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I guess I'm second after Joe, born in 1938..He covered it.Why say more?
  • iwannausernameiwannausername Member Posts: 7,131
    edited November -1
    '71 model here, and racing isn't just left turns (ghia racing is an exception...) .....
  • AZ9JAZ9J Member Posts: 619 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    1946

    Well said and true JOE
  • jc_crazyhorsejc_crazyhorse Member Posts: 1,083 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Born in 1970, and the changes that have ocurred in just the daily outlook on things like children and thier care, personal issues in families, and the bad mouthing of pretty much everything is what I've noticed.
    As was said before, it doesn't seem like people today want to have to work for anything. Seems we have grown to soft, fat and lazy. And the whiners seem to be doing all they can to blame everyone and or thing but themselves for the state we are in. Makes me wonder where we'll be in another 36 years.
  • PJPJ Member Posts: 1,556 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • KSUmarksmanKSUmarksman Member Posts: 10,705 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    born in 1983,
    as a very young lad circa 1993-1994 I remember watching Star Trek: The Next Generation and thinking "wow it would be cool to have their technology".
    Now I look around and see that sans particle weapons and warp travel we DO have their technology...
    hold on, someone is hailing me on my communicator, uh I mean cell phone [:o)]

    It boggles the mind to see how far our world has advanced in even the relativey short time that I've lived in this world. Can't imagine what its like to look at from an older perspective. But I am looking forward to the advances of the next 20 years, if we don't destroy ourselves.
  • buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,250 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by brier-49
    Born in 1949, biggest change I have seen is in politics. The Republicans are just like the DEmocrats were in the 50's and early 60's and the Democrats are Almost totally Communist.yep, my dad's an "old school" democrat from that era. he supports all the stuff modern dems want to do -EXCEPT gun control- but I still respect him. I've met others like him. I think those older dems are a different breed, yes, they do act somewhat like modern republicans, if with different ideals.
  • codenamepaulcodenamepaul Member Posts: 2,931
    edited November -1
  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    <
    You have to ask??
  • dolfandolfan Member Posts: 4,159
    edited November -1
    1961. Will be 46 in 25 days.

    +1 on what Joeaf posted...well said.

    I've seen a lot of changes as well, especially on immigration.
    I've lived and seen how my hometown, Miami, changed due to our government's policies. I refuse to leave though...this is my Miami. I will continue to fly Old Glory amist all the other assorted foreign colors flown in these parts.

    I've lived through the Cocaine Cowboy days of Miami, circa early '80s. The Mariel boatlift, with all the scum that came over.
    Hurricane Andrew tore up my previous residence. Katrina + Wilma busted my * cleaning and rebuilding. Hording food, water, gasoline, ammo + guns is now a way of life for me.

    I remember during the '60s hearing the air raid sirens blasting every Saturday at 1:00pm...thanks to Castro and the Missle Crisis.

    Miami is a beautiful city. Its the people here that suck.
  • sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
    edited November -1
    Quote:

    Originally posted by brier-49

    Born in 1949, biggest change I have seen is in politics. The Republicans are just like the DEmocrats were in the 50's and early 60's and the Democrats are Almost totally Communist.


    This is the change that has surprised me the most. A total turn to socialism by our democratic party and the younger generation is not even aware of this change and they embrace this party with open arms!
    I never would have believed it would happen in America. I now believe anything is possible.
  • Colt SuperColt Super Member Posts: 31,007
    edited November -1
    dolfan -

    I lived in South Florida for awhile, and you are right. Same can be said of california.

    Doug
  • shooter4shooter4 Member Posts: 4,457
    edited November -1
    Born in 1951.

    Joe said it all.
  • rossowmnrossowmn Member Posts: 2,127 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Born in 1947 -- just turned 6-0 and getting closer to retirement every second.

    I used to go to local stock-car races when I was a kid in the '50s. I still feel bad about seeing the old Model A's, etc, getting smashed to *, and later the '55-'57 coupes and two-doors. My neighbor about two miles down the gravel road used to race '35 Chevy coupes. I've looked for one to street-rod for all my adult life and have never found one in my price range.[:(][:(][:(] It's sad how many of those great old cars got thrashed and trashed. Maybe that's why I prefer drag racing to stock-car racing.[;)]
  • William81William81 Member Posts: 20,826 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    1958 model here. What's NASCAR....[;)] Not much of a race fan, I do like to watch drag racing.

    +1 joeaf1911a1
  • joeaf1911a1joeaf1911a1 Member Posts: 3,340
    edited November -1
    Quote: " I was born in 1955. Since my own parents were not natives of the USA, immigarting here less than a year before I was born, I don't have any preconceived notions of how wonderful it must have been in the United States prior to it's "going downhill". What I do see is more people getting a higher level of education than ever before, a very high standard of living and much more equality for women and minorites than ever existed back in the good old days. Back before the early 1960's the USA appeared to be more of a country club for white christian males instead the melting pot with liberty and justice for all that it was made out to be. " Evidentally you dont think we have "gone downhill". A "higher level of education ", no. Just more classroom time in many worthless subjects such as sex, diversity and the likes. Even business owners admit the caliber of graduates is not up to par anymore. We are not a "melting pot" anymore and havent been a "melting pot" for a long time. Quite true, many "Immagrants" have no wishes to "melt in" and wish to stay in their own groups and keep their own language and customs. Instead of a "high standard of living" it is a "high standard of borrowing and debt" we are in as home forclosures are at its hightest siince the '29 depression. More people on welfare and food stamps than ever before. "A country club for white Christian males before 1960" ??? Think again guy. We worked for all we got and worked hard for it, also over 20,000,000 of us fought in 3 wars to make a country free so YOU and your parents could enjoy it. NOW guy, lets just see what you have done for this country for allowing your family (and then you) to come here??? And actually, this Country being many trillions of dollars in debt, I still say, we are going downhill in many ways. Financialy, moraraly,
    and our patriotism is declineing rapidly.
  • Colt SuperColt Super Member Posts: 31,007
    edited November -1
    Joe -

    Absolutely true, and if anything, you understated. Thank you for your Service. I appreciate you laying your life on the line for Kristov and his Mom & Dad.

    Sometimes I bet you wonder, if it was worth the effort.

    Doug
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