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    Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member, Moderator Posts: 66,368 ******
    edited November -1
    That's dumber than a plastic bag full of college professors.
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    And fiery auto crashes
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    While sifting through my ashes
    Some will fall in love with life
    And drink it from a fountain
    That is pouring like an avalanche
    Coming down the mountain
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    shilowarshilowar Member Posts: 38,811 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    First I've heard of it, and truly ignorant. Our policy expressly prohibits warning shots.
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,657 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It truly worries me when people can actually be this stupid and show up to vote and also work in Law Enforcement.

    When an officer has reason to discharge his firearm, I want it discharged TWICE, both shots direct center mass hits.
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    capguncapgun Member Posts: 1,848
    edited November -1
    A lot of variables involved. If firing a warning shot, prohibited in every agency I know of, the officer better be absolutely certain of his backstop and it must be a situation where he is justified in using deadly force. Just because an officer is justified in using deadly force does not mean he has to kill the assailant. We had a case where a mentally deranged guy on a sidewalk was waving a knife and threatening to kill people. When an officer arrived the guy slowly advanced on the officer waving the knife. The officer backed up, but the guy still kept advancing toward him with the knife. The officer would have been justified in using deadly force. Instead, the officer fired a round into a telephone pole next to the guy, the guy dropped the knife and gave up. Under the right circumstances I may fire a warning shot. I would have to feel certain the outcome would have a good chance of succeeding. Having been involved in shootings, I know any plan B that may keep you from having to kill someone is worth a try under the right circumstances. And to the general, very critical public, if you did fire a warning shot and then still had to kill the assailant, it would give the appearance that you did everything possible, went the extra mile, to try to avoid killing the subject. That can be very important when the anti-police people are trying to label you a wanton murderer.
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    remingtonoaksremingtonoaks Member Posts: 26,245 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This is got to be an April fool's joke!
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    serfserf Member Posts: 9,217 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpost


    It truly worries me when people can actually be this stupid and show up to vote and also work in Law Enforcement.

    When an officer has reason to discharge his firearm, I want it discharged TWICE, both shots direct center mass hits.


    Hell in England The regular police don't even carry guns! It's the NWO mentality for police,don't you know? You better start worrying some more.

    serf

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/02/18/5-countries-where-police-officers-do-not-carry-firearms-and-it-works-well/?utm_term=.5e255c24ed38

    Wright also thinks that the powerful standing of women in Iceland's politics, as well as within the police force, has helped to maintain low crime rates. Both Oddsson and Wright agree that low inequality and a strong welfare system have contributed to Iceland's success in sustaining its unarmed police.
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    JamesRKJamesRK Member Posts: 25,670 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Makes almost as much sense as "shoot the gun out of his hand.

    In one of my Virginia deadly force classes we were told that many moons ago the North Carolina Department of Corrections policy was "shoot to wound".

    An inmate got outside of a correctional facility and was running across an open field. The officer in the tower drew a bead on him and shot him in the leg, then put the rifle back in the rack. The inmate got up a limped off to freedom.

    The corrections officer was fired for allowing an inmate to escape. He hired a lawyer and went to court to get his job back. After the lawyer convinced the judge the officer did everything required by DOC policy, DOC was forced to rehire the CO with back pay.

    NCDOC changed their policy from "shoot to wound" to "shoot to stop". As far as I know that is the policy of all law enforcement organizations everywhere now.
    The road to hell is paved with COMPROMISE.
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