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cuban cigar

mp5shootermp5shooter Member Posts: 2,429 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited January 2006 in General Discussion
I smoke a cuban cigar this evening. I am not a avid smoker but this was a pretty good cigar. it was a cohiba. does anyone know about these?

Comments

  • guns-n-painthorsesguns-n-painthorses Member Posts: 7,041
    edited November -1
    Yea, that means your gonna stink at work tomorrow![:D]
  • EndlssEndlss Member Posts: 1,068 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Nope never heard of them.

    The only way to tell if it was real is to get a good pic of the band and post it.
  • royc38royc38 Member Posts: 2,345 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, Very good cigar. have some left myself and also if you can, try the Monte Cristos. My favorite.
  • morsecodemorsecode Member Posts: 1,116 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Where'd you get it? Lots of counterfeit Cohibas out there (but they're pretty good too)
  • mp5shootermp5shooter Member Posts: 2,429 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    my brother in law braught them back from costa rica today and he also got me some montecristo also
  • morsecodemorsecode Member Posts: 1,116 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Then I think you should do a 141 post giveaway [:p][;)]
  • deceedecee Member Posts: 456 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have been smoking stogies since forever.

    Cohiba's are made in Cuba. They used to be a great cigar until Fidel took over.

    They do not burn straight and plug frequently

    I CAN and do go to Cuba frequently.
    Cohibas and Montecristo's are nothing but junk now.
    They command a fortune in price for the simple reason that my American friends cannot get them. It is the mystery and scarctiy of them.

    As soon as Cuba can export them to the USA, the price will drop like a rock.

    Currently in Cuba , a box of Monte #4's is about $135 USD


    PS will you guys please stop shooting at us Canadians. We are there to help you
  • leftytwogunsleftytwoguns Member Posts: 785 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't know about cigars, they'r all over where I live, but I can't stand the taste of those baccy sticks. They are too overbearing on the palet. Gives a taste that induces a listerine rinse every time. Stick to the Copenhagen fellas, you can survive without a lip and teeth, but not lungs. People who have smoked in the past always inhale a bit. Those things are tar sticks.
    Only thing I like about those suckers is the walk in humidors, they smell mighty fine.
  • slipgateslipgate Member Posts: 12,741
    edited November -1
    My wife got me some pre-ban cuban cigars for our anniversary last year, too bad they molded before I had a chance to smoke any of them. Got them from redenvelope.com. I really like Don Pepe brazilian cigars, but they are very hard to find. I usually stick with Ashtons.
  • shooter4shooter4 Member Posts: 4,457
    edited November -1
    Seems the Domincans are the top of the line now and they use cuban seeds and have the same climate.

    Interesting story about Cohiba;


    Search
    Cigars
    Cigars Will The Real Cohiba Please Stand Up

    There is perhaps no brand name in the world more copied, counterfeited or fought over than the name Cohiba. Setting aside the problem of actual counterfeits, there are three 'legitimate' cigars you can get on many web sites that are called Cohibas. There are those that say that one, two or all three are not authentic and some are called counterfeits. So which is which?

    To unravel the mystery, you have to go back to pre-revolutionary Cuba. At that time, a cigar was manufactured in Cuba by Cuban rollers, using Cuban tobaccos and blended by Cuban experts. That cigar called a Cohiba had an excellent reputation as a very strong and well made cigar. When Castro came to power and nationalized tobacco manufacturing, some of the leading experts, rollers and owners of patent rights left the country. They settled in many other countries including the US but the Dominican Republic acquired more than it's share of experts. That is where the problems began. The Cuban Cohiba brand continued to be manufactured in Cuba with less experienced rollers and without the experts that had blended the cigars in the past. In addition, the people that owned the copy rights to the name were now settled in the Dominican Republic.

    Soon these immigrants began to do what they did best, grow tobacco and make cigars. They used the rollers and experts that came from Cuba but used Dominican or other tobaccos in their product after the US placed an embargo on Cuban products. The owners of the copy rights naturally started using the brand names they owned even though the product they produced was nothing like the product they had produced in Cuba. Through a series of purchases and mergers, the brand name Cohiba produced in the Dominican Republic was purchased by the General Cigar company. But in the confusion, some of the copy rights were not international copy rights but for specific countries. One such copy right was for cigars manufactured in the Domincan Republic for sale only in the Dominican Republic.
    This led to a third brand that was called Cohiba but could only be sold in the Dominican. Some of these cigars were imported to the US under that name. They are manufactured at a factory called 'Montecristi' not to be confused with the brand name 'Montecristo'. Got all that straight? OK. When these cigars started coming into the US, General Cigar sought court action based on copy right infringement. They won the case but the judge ruled that any cigars that were already imported could be sold. No new imports, however, would be allowed. Of course, it is impossible to tell whether certain cigars were imported before or after the court order but there are legitimate cigars that can be purchased with name Cohiba that were manufactured in the Montecristi factory. So now we have three cigars you can purchase under the name of Cohiba. Here's how you tell the difference.

    Cigars manufactured in Cuba have a yellow, black and white band. They say 'Cohiba' and have the words 'La Habana, Cuba' under the name. These words were added in the early 90s so should be present unless your buying very old cigars. The Dominican Republic cigars manufactured by General cigar have a completely different band. It is red, black and white with the 'o' in Cohiba filled in red, hence the name Cohiba red dots. The cigars manufactured at the Montecristi factory have a label that is yellow, black and white and similar to the Cuban band. The difference is the words 'La Habana, Cuba' are replaced with words 'Republica Dominicana'. These are commonly called yellow band Dominican Cohiba. So which are the Cohibas your friend said to try? My guess would be the red dots. Cuban Cohibas are, of course, illegal in the US and yellow band Dominican Cohibas by all accounts are not very good cigars. So what's the bottom line.

    I have smoked the Cuban and the red dot Cohibas. Both are very good but totally different. They might as well be different brands. I prefer the red dots but that is a matter of taste. These two cigars are expensive and have limited availability. I have not tried the yellow band Dominican Cohibas but have seen them for sale on web sites at a lot less than the red dots. Friends have said they are not as good as the red dots but that's up to you. What you need to do when buying cigars on line is understand what you're buying. If they are advertised as Dominican Cohibas, ask if they are the red dot or yellow band and expect what you order. A second action you can take is to know the person you're buying from. Large legitimate vendors that sell Cuban cigars will only sell Cuban Cohibas. Large vendors that sell Dominican cigars will only sell either the red dots or the yellow bands, not both.

    So which are the real Cohibas? In my way of thinking, the only true Cohibas are the pre-revolution cigars. Cigars made after that time under the name Cohiba where made with either different tobaccos or with different rolling and blending expertise. So as my grandmother used to say, 'Yous pays your money and yous makes your choice'.
  • iwannausernameiwannausername Member Posts: 7,131
    edited November -1
    I've had a few cubans, and while they are great, if I were buying I'd just get some good Macanudos, etc. The cubans are good, just not worth the massive extra cost.
  • COLTCOLT Member, Moderator Posts: 12,621 ******
    edited November -1
    ...I had a Cuban girfriend a few years back. Her Father was a cigar roller, did special events, and had a shop. She would bring me some of the finest (imo) cigars to ever have a fire touch them off.mmm.
    Her dad was written up in some national cigar magazine once. He had came from Cuba so he knew what to to with those leaves. Alas, they both moved to Miami, no more cuban,...or cigars either...[:(]
    ani-texas-flag.gif
  • EndlssEndlss Member Posts: 1,068 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Holy crap, decee nailed it perfect.
    Cohiba's and Monte's are really hit or miss, too many years have to go into age to get a good smoke out of them. They are way overpriced.
    I love the lesser brands and get alot of them cheaper than well known cigars anywhere in the US.
  • alledanalledan Member Posts: 19,541
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by decee
    I have been smoking stogies since forever.

    Cohiba's are made in Cuba. They used to be a great cigar until Fidel took over.

    They do not burn straight and plug frequently

    I CAN and do go to Cuba frequently.
    Cohibas and Montecristo's are nothing but junk now.
    They command a fortune in price for the simple reason that my American friends cannot get them. It is the mystery and scarctiy of them.

    As soon as Cuba can export them to the USA, the price will drop like a rock.

    Currently in Cuba , a box of Monte #4's is about $135 USD


    PS will you guys please stop shooting at us Canadians. We are there to help you


    I love Cohibas but the $250.000 fine for having them here in America
    is quite the deterant for me[:(][:(] I will smoke mine in Windsor[:D]
  • morsecodemorsecode Member Posts: 1,116 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Trading with Enemy Act, 50 USC App5(b)
    The Cuban Asset Control Regulation
    Code of Federal Regulations, section 515.101 et seq. vol. 19
    "The purchase, importation, transportation or otherwise dealing with merchandise outside the US if that merchandise is: (1) of Cuban origin; (2) is or has been located in or transported through Cuba; (3) is made or derived in whole or in part from articles which are the growth, produce, or manufacture of Cuba, is illegal and punishable by a fine of not more than $50,000 or imprisonment of not more than 10 years."

    "A transaction between a US citizen within the US and his agent, home office, branch, or correspondent outside the US is prohibited as if he made the transaction. Gifts of Cuban origin, whether acquired by US citizens abroad or brought into the US by another to be given as a gift within the US is prohibited unless liscensed by the Office of Foreign Assests Control at the US Department of the Treasury."

    "The Cuban Assets Control Regulations of the US Treasury Department require that persons subject to US jurisdiction be liscensed to engage in any transaction related to travel to, from, through, and within Cuba. Liscenses are *not* granted for business and tourism. This restriction includes travel to and from Cuba through a third party (such as Canada or Mexico, for example)."

    You'd get less fine for 100 lbs of mary jane.
  • kriskris Member Posts: 973 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    www.herfersparadise.net .great forum for anybody interested in cigars from any country...honduran...dominican...cuba..i found out a long time ago...cigars are like a fine wine.many to try..many to avoid... cuban fakes are everywhere..from cigars to the labels to the boxes.
  • eastwood44mageastwood44mag Member Posts: 2,655 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Cohiba makes some of the best cigars in the world. However, there are more fakes made than social diseases in a cheap brothel. That being said, get a box of US-friendly cigars, and don't worry about the alphabet agency.
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