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Japanese Arista Rifles?

sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
edited September 2006 in General Discussion
I cannot find these in Fjestad's Blue Book of Gun Values, 25 edition.

Anyone know anything about them?

Comments

  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Yeah, I'm an expert on them. Look under Japanese Military in Blue Book.
  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    It's spelled Arasaka
  • sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by p3skyking
    Yeah, I'm an expert on them. Look under Japanese Military in Blue Book.



    I may get a chance to look at the rifle closer today and I will follow your advice and get more info on where it was produced and when. I was told the year but also wonder how they figured it out since I don't believe any of them spead anything other that English and German.

    I will repost as soon as I get the data and take a quick look down the bore. Thanks for your help on the expert forum.
  • 1911a1-fan1911a1-fan Member Posts: 51,193 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    try arisaki also


    what is it you need to know, most here can tell you what they actually sell for, and what is most desired in them, i myself find that better than a book
  • hughbetchahughbetcha Member Posts: 7,782 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think it's Arisaka. Japanese rifles are also known by year of introduction Type 99, type 37 etc.

    The Arisaka is a very strong bolt action design, pretty ugly and often crudely finished due to wartime production shortages. Japanese were the first to use chromium lining on bores of their rifles to reduce corrosion.

    I paid about $150 for my Arisaka about 15 years ago. It has the crest ground off the receiver ring. I think an Arisaka with Chrysanthamum crest on receiver is pretty rare and probably worth a lot more.
  • Ox190Ox190 Member Posts: 2,782
    edited November -1
    I have one with the crest...only problem with the gun is my grandfather ground off the T bolt and made it like a traditional bolt action. It's a 7.7 and man that is an expensive little sucker to shoot. But mine is pretty darn accurate and blast to shoot.
  • KYfatboyKYfatboy Member Posts: 859 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't like, you could not pay me enough to shoot one of them. They have no gas checks on the bolt, their dangerous to shoot. A friend of mine had one and was shooting it A long time ago, A part of the bolt went through his eye. They aint worth nothing.
  • 1911a1-fan1911a1-fan Member Posts: 51,193 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    arisaka, arisaki, potato /patato

    i did not say which was correct because i have seen it both ways although i think arisaka is correct, but you may find it often spelled arisaki


    i have found great deals on onkyo stereo equipment by looking up onkio
  • WulfmannWulfmann Member Posts: 4,845 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thye are considered the strongest bolt action built, as I have been told.
    So, I suspect your friends rifle had a problem that should have been checked before he fired it but that is certainly speculation)
    I recently bought one (7.7MM) with a duffle cut stock so it is missing the first 6 inches from the muzzle. Other than that and the ground off CR it is complete with the AA sites perfect. I had 3 Norma rounds I found sometime back at the range and so fired one at a 25 yard target. It went exactly where I pointed it and the crome bore is like a mirror. But, I have so many calibers I will drag it to the gun show.
    What do you think I should expect? For about 100 bucks I could buy dies 100 cases and 500 311 bullets that would likely last a lifetime so can't see giving it away as it works so well.

    Wulfmann
    3YUCmbB.jpg
    "Fools learn from their own mistakes. I learn from the mistakes of others"
    Otto von Bismarck
  • sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 1911a1fan
    try arisaki also


    what is it you need to know, most here can tell you what they actually sell for, and what is most desired in them, i myself find that better than a book



    Trying to establish a value on the rifle. Its a model 99 with the flower stamped and the 16" bayonet. Looks to be in top shape, no rust according to my friend. 7.????? cal This rifle was brought back by an old gals husband following the war and wrapped for safekeeping.
  • 1911a1-fan1911a1-fan Member Posts: 51,193 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Trying to establish a value on the rifle. Its a model 99 with the flower stamped and the 16" bayonet. Looks to be in top shape, no rust according to my friend. 7.????? cal

    here is what i have seen/bought/sold in the Midwest area

    one in really good shape can fetch 125-150 bucks, add 75 for the bayonet alone if it has the sheath, now if the mum is in tack 100% i would not take less than 400 for the rifle alone



    here is an excelent link for your markings

    http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by KYfatboy
    I don't like, you could not pay me enough to shoot one of them. They have no gas checks on the bolt, their dangerous to shoot. A friend of mine had one and was shooting it A long time ago, A part of the bolt went through his eye. They aint worth nothing.


    There is a very good chance your friend fired a live round in a training rifle. They were designed for blanks only and made from cast steel. They are plainly marked for training only, but in Japanese! How many round eyes can read Japanese? This is the origin of the erroneous stories of cast iron rifles.

    The NRA did blow-up test in the fifties using all the principle weapons of WWII, Springfield, Mauser, Enfield, Arisaka. They fused the bolt of the Arisaka, but it never gave way while the others did.

    I've fired last ditch, and I mean last ditch, weapons without problem.
  • hughbetchahughbetcha Member Posts: 7,782 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by p3skyking
    There is a very good chance your friend fired a live round in a training rifle.


    Ooh...I hate when that happens...
  • HighballHighball Member Posts: 15,755
    edited November -1
    Actually, P.O. Ackley ran a series of tests many years ago..the fifties, perhaps...and the * rifle came up the winner in the pure brute strength catagory. Packing the barrel full of bullets merely resulted in the barrel being blown out of the action...they screwed another barrel on the action and continued trying to destroy the action.

    The amount of powder they put in the case was amazing..(fast burning powder)..

    The training rifles mentioned above WERE indeed dangerous..

    The * rifles have experienced a jump in prices, the last few years. I have seen some priced 5-600 bucks, the rarer ones.
  • Colonel PlinkColonel Plink Member Posts: 16,460
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by KYfatboy
    I don't like, you could not pay me enough to shoot one of them. They have no gas checks on the bolt, their dangerous to shoot. A friend of mine had one and was shooting it A long time ago, A part of the bolt went through his eye. They aint worth nothing.


    I shot mine last Sunday.
    Then a sharp-eyed young lady shot it and landed a group of three inside an inch and a half. As soon as I get the bolt bent and have it drilled and tapped, I'm going to scope it and use it for a deer/elk rifle. It cost me $35.00 to buy, and with the new stock and recoil pad, I guess I've got less than a hundred and a half into a very nice, very accurate rifle.
    I respectfully disagree that they're inherently dangerous. They've got one of, if not the strongest actions produced. But stuff happens. I am sorry to hear about your friend.
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