.

Anyone???

CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
edited July 2006 in General Discussion
This is on the want forum. Decided to put it up here also.

http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=205604
Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.

Comments

  • Henry0ReillyHenry0Reilly Member Posts: 10,678 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Please tell me this photo on your Yahoo! profile isn't you:

    c3c8scd.jpg?pfPsupEBSOGQKYem

    Glad you found the www.freecycle.org site.
    I used to recruit for the NRA until they sold us down the river (again!) in Heller v. DC. See my auctions (if any) under username henryreilly
  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
    edited November -1
    Why not? Just because you have more teeth than I do doesn't mean we're that much unalike.
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    I have done all kinds of canning from fruits, veggies, pickles to meat and I have never needed a pressure canner...What are you planning to can?
  • Henry0ReillyHenry0Reilly Member Posts: 10,678 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How about those White Sox?
    I used to recruit for the NRA until they sold us down the river (again!) in Heller v. DC. See my auctions (if any) under username henryreilly
  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by BlackRoses
    I have done all kinds of canning from fruits, veggies, pickles to meat and I have never needed a pressure canner...What are you planning to can?


    Tomatoes and green beens, and do some pickled peppers. I was under the impression that you need a canner.
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Henry0Reilly
    How about those White Sox?




    Don't get me started.
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    A canner yes...pressure cooker, not really..and yes there is a diff..
  • FrogbertFrogbert Member Posts: 2,380 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Canning does not require a pressure device. The cooling of the super hot filling seals the container very tightly when a proper seal has been made while hot.

    Pressure cookers shorten cooking time by forcing the hot steam into the material to be cooked because they are sealed while cold and then heated.

    In a large canning operations, such as used to take place at my grandmother's house to preserve the gardens produce for the winter's eating, pressure cookers were often used to save time with the heating/cooking first half of the operation.

    The product is removed from the pressure cooker and put into mason jars and the steel lid applied with a rubber gasket while everything is piping hot. When it cools, a vacuum is formed inside the jar and the seal becomes quite tight. The cooking kills any bacteria in the product and the vacuum seal prevents any oxygen or contaminate from entering the container, thereby keeping it safe to consume indefinitely.

    Particularly when preserving fruit preserves, jellies and jams, a large pot with a canning rack that holds the containers in a bath of boiling water prior to filling is used. These are helpful when the seal is being made with parafin wax, instead of a lid. The containers are filled with hot fruit preparation while sitting in boiling water with the tops above the water and open as secured by the rack which holds them in place. After filling, the 1/2 inch or so of parafin wax is poured on top and the rack, which is grasped by handles that sit over and outside the boiling pot, is lifted out and placed on a table top or counter top to cool. These boiling pots and container rack combinations are sometimes referred to as canners.
  • dlrjjdlrjj Member Posts: 5,528 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Frogbert
    Canning does not require a pressure device. The cooling of the super hot filling seals the container very tightly when a proper seal has been made while hot.

    Pressure cookers shorten cooking time by forcing the hot steam into the material to be cooked because they are sealed while cold and then heated.

    In a large canning operations, such as used to take place at my grandmother's house to preserve the gardens produce for the winter's eating, pressure cookers were often used to save time with the heating/cooking first half of the operation.

    The product is removed from the pressure cooker and put into mason jars and the steel lid applied with a rubber gasket while everything is piping hot. When it cools, a vacuum is formed inside the jar and the seal becomes quite tight. The cooking kills any bacteria in the product and the vacuum seal prevents any oxygen or contaminate from entering the container, thereby keeping it safe to consume indefinitely.

    Particularly when preserving fruit preserves, jellies and jams, a large pot with a canning rack that holds the containers in a bath of boiling water prior to filling is used. These are helpful when the seal is being made with parafin wax, instead of a lid. The containers are filled with hot fruit preparation while sitting in boiling water with the tops above the water and open as secured by the rack which holds them in place. After filling, the 1/2 inch or so of parafin wax is poured on top and the rack, which is grasped by handles that sit over and outside the boiling pot, is lifted out and placed on a table top or counter top to cool. These boiling pots and container rack combinations are sometimes referred to as canners.

    Boy does that bring back memories of a whole bunch of green bean cans and jelly jars.[:)]
    Tax evasion is illegal, tax avoidance is an art form.
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