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I had always wondered how to do this now I know

mogley98mogley98 Member Posts: 17,683 ✭✭✭✭
edited September 2018 in General Discussion
Pretty slick makes a nice finish

Why don't we go to school and work on the weekends and take the week off!

Comments

  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 12,563 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A very sharp blade and high quality glue are your best friends when doing this.
    Be careful when you cut off the little piece with the miter saw. Those little buggers can fly across the work site and get lost quicker than a gun spring!
  • SCOUT5SCOUT5 Member Posts: 14,687 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There's other ways that look just as good, are a lot less time consuming and doesn't leave a small piece to get dislodged through the years.
  • AlpineAlpine Member Posts: 14,472 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    9 times out of 10 you will spend more time looking for that little piece than doing it another way.
    ?The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.?
    Margaret Thatcher

    "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics."
    Mark Twain
  • US Military GuyUS Military Guy Member Posts: 3,271 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is called a "Return".

    I have been doing it that way for over 40 years.

    A zero clearance fence on your saw will help greatly to keep the piece from flying all over the place.
  • jimdeerejimdeere Member Posts: 20,343 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yep. One of the first things my carpenter friend from high school taught me.
    Hint:
    Use a hand powered mitre saw.
    That?s mitre, not miter.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,808 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    There's other ways that look just as good, are a lot less time consuming and doesn't leave a small piece to get dislodged through the years.


    A way that Craftsmen finished that molding before the power mitre saw was invented?

    But who wants to work with their hands and hand tools these days?
  • asphalt cowboyasphalt cowboy Member Posts: 8,572 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jimdeere
    Yep. One of the first things my carpenter friend from high school taught me.
    Hint:
    Use a hand powered mitre saw.
    That?s mitre, not miter.


    I've got a 40+ year old Craftsman that I use often. With the blade properly sharpened and set it will cut nearly veneer thin.
  • SCOUT5SCOUT5 Member Posts: 14,687 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    There's other ways that look just as good, are a lot less time consuming and doesn't leave a small piece to get dislodged through the years.


    A way that Craftsmen finished that molding before the power mitre saw was invented?

    But who wants to work with their hands and hand tools these days?


    I may be the only guy in the county that still has a rasp in his nail apron.
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 12,563 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    There's other ways that look just as good, are a lot less time consuming and doesn't leave a small piece to get dislodged through the years.


    A way that Craftsmen finished that molding before the power mitre saw was invented?

    But who wants to work with their hands and hand tools these days?


    I may be the only guy in the county that still has a rasp in his nail apron.

    Not in my apron, but there is one in my tool bag.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,808 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    quote:Originally posted by SCOUT5
    There's other ways that look just as good, are a lot less time consuming and doesn't leave a small piece to get dislodged through the years.


    A way that Craftsmen finished that molding before the power mitre saw was invented?

    But who wants to work with their hands and hand tools these days?


    I may be the only guy in the county that still has a rasp in his nail apron.


    Most people are familiar with the 'very' course rasp that works well with soft woods, but do you have a 'Cabinet Makers Rasp' who's teeth are about half as high as a 'standard' rasp? Works amazingly well on hard woods.

    I tripped over one when my Wood Patten Maker/Model Maker father retired and brought his tools home. I was working as an Industrial Sculptor at the time, and that 'fine' rasp came in real handy at times.

    http://www.nicholsontool.com/files/rasp
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