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stupid idea #5,881,642

buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭
edited September 2008 in General Discussion
my dog lays on the tile floor of the bathroom because it cools her off.

I'm thinking, the tile itself isn't cold, it's room temperature like the rug next to it. it must feel cooler because it draws the heat away from her.

all right, where does the heat go?

I think it goes through the tiles and over to the toilet bowl. that feels really nice and cool. and it's got water in it.

or, you could say the toilet bowl cools off the tile floor.

if that's the case, how about dumping a bag or 2 of ice cubes in the toilet bowl, to make the tile floor cooler, and really make a dog happy.

Comments

  • watrulookinatwatrulookinat Member Posts: 4,693
    edited November -1
    How about turning on the a/c.
  • dheffleydheffley Member Posts: 25,000
    edited November -1
    The tile just has a lower insulation factor from the cool ground to the dog, and carpet has a better insulating factor so her body heat isn't absorbed as well.
  • buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How about turning on the a/c.

    not hot enough. for me anyways.
  • spryorspryor Member Posts: 9,155
    edited November -1
    Or...you could cool a spot for it with a CO2 fire extinguisher every
    15min. or so..[;)]
  • givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    If you don't mind shriveled nuts in the morning, leave the bathroom window open, so the floor gets a chance to really cool down overnight. Best as always, Joe
  • buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    or some kind of heat sink glommed onto the floor. with a fan on it.
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    my dog lays on the tile floor IN the bathroom ALSO
  • bartobarto Member Posts: 4,860
    edited November -1
    My guess is the dog lays there so it doesn't have to go so far for a drink.
    [:D]barto[:D]
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,791 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Tile, like stone/rock, IS cooler then your carpet. Rock/stone WANTS to be 68 degrees (this is the reason that most inspection surface plates are made from granite) while you man-made fiber carpet will assume the surrounding temperature.
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,864 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The tile on the floor is indeed room temperature, but room temperature is lower than dog temperature. The tile acts like a heat sink trying to absorb the heat from the dog and equalize the temps between the two.

    Ergo...ice in the toilet bowl...will only give the dog a nice cool drink when she decides to get up.[:D][;)]
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,864 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    Tile, like stone/rock, IS cooler then your carpet. Rock/stone WANTS to be 68 degrees (this is the reason that most inspection surface plates are made from granite) while you man-made fiber carpet will assume the surrounding temperature.


    Not really, tile and stone react slower to changes in temps, hence the 'appearance' of it being cooler. Over time, however, the temps of tile and stone will reach the ambient temp of the environment surrounding it.

    If you put a piece of tile or stone in a thermally controlled environment (say an oven), and leave it there for a while, the tile stone will equalize with the ambient temp. When it is removed it will also take longer to cool down.

    The carpet you refer to just reacts faster because it has less mass. Perform the same test with carpet and an oven and, (after you put the fire out) you will find the carpet heated up faster and cooled down faster.

    It's that old Mr Physics again...[8D]
  • spanielsellsspanielsells Member Posts: 12,498
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Flying Clay Disk
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    Tile, like stone/rock, IS cooler then your carpet. Rock/stone WANTS to be 68 degrees (this is the reason that most inspection surface plates are made from granite) while you man-made fiber carpet will assume the surrounding temperature.


    Not really, tile and stone react slower to changes in temps, hence the 'appearance' of it being cooler. Over time, however, the temps of tile and stone will reach the ambient temp of the environment surrounding it.

    If you put a piece of tile or stone in a thermally controlled environment (say an oven), and leave it there for a while, the tile stone will equalize with the ambient temp. When it is removed it will also take longer to cool down.

    The carpet you refer to just reacts faster because it has less mass. Perform the same test with carpet and an oven and, (after you put the fire out) you will find the carpet heated up faster and cooled down faster.

    It's that old Mr Physics again...[8D]
    John Physics is still around? Holy smokes!

    I know John Crapper, who invented the toilet, is dead.

    John Airconditioning, who invented the air conditioner, is dead.

    John Basketball, who invented basketball, is dead.

    John Computer, who invented the computer, is dead.

    But old John Physics is still around, huh? Impressive... most impressive.
  • spryorspryor Member Posts: 9,155
    edited November -1
    quote:..
    The carpet you refer to just reacts faster because it has less mass... There's what it's all about.
  • buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    weell, that's getting into the heat capacity aspect of it. the more mass, the more capable it is of sucking up heat. and some materials are simply better at that even if they do have the same mass, like copper or aluminum.
  • HappyNanoqHappyNanoq Member Posts: 12,023
    edited November -1
    Dump it on the dog instead.....
    truelove.jpg
  • MarnerMarner Member Posts: 2,977
    edited November -1
    My dog is able to sit in the blazing hot sun all day long without ever trying to cool off.... [:D]

    Barker.jpg?t=1220292411
  • buschmasterbuschmaster Member Posts: 14,230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    that's a polar bear!
    she does like to eat ice cubes, but that's about it.
  • watrulookinatwatrulookinat Member Posts: 4,693
    edited November -1
    Yep...it kinda of seems sad that he isn't in his natural environment, just look at em.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,791 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Flying Clay Disk
    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    Tile, like stone/rock, IS cooler then your carpet. Rock/stone WANTS to be 68 degrees (this is the reason that most inspection surface plates are made from granite) while you man-made fiber carpet will assume the surrounding temperature.


    Not really, tile and stone react slower to changes in temps, hence the 'appearance' of it being cooler. Over time, however, the temps of tile and stone will reach the ambient temp of the environment surrounding it.

    If you put a piece of tile or stone in a thermally controlled environment (say an oven), and leave it there for a while, the tile stone will equalize with the ambient temp. When it is removed it will also take longer to cool down.

    The carpet you refer to just reacts faster because it has less mass. Perform the same test with carpet and an oven and, (after you put the fire out) you will find the carpet heated up faster and cooled down faster.

    It's that old Mr Physics again...[8D]


    FCD - I think the word you were looking for is DENSITY, not mass. A pound of Granite has much more DENSITY then a pound of carpet.
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