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Question about cast iron kettle.

cahascahas Member Posts: 4,064
edited February 2008 in General Discussion
Started setting an old cast iron tea kettle on the wood stove to put some moisture back in the air.I seasoned it the same way i did the cast iron skillet.After about a month its starting to rust on the inside.Do i reseason or is there something i can add too the water to prevent this?

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    dcon12dcon12 Member Posts: 31,969 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Nope, you are done, Next question please. Don
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    Locust ForkLocust Fork Member Posts: 31,766 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    fat....crisco rubbed on it while not in use will help.
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    cahascahas Member Posts: 4,064
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Locust Fork
    fat....crisco rubbed on it while not in use will help.
    Thanks,is an heirloom and would hate to ruin it.
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    ljwrenchljwrench Member Posts: 5,053
    edited November -1
    It's gonna rust with water in it. If all your gonna do with it is use it as a humidifier I wouldn't worry about it. If your gonna worry about it, I'd spray some Pam (or other non-stick spray) into it and season it every couple of weeks.
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    FrancFFrancF Member Posts: 35,278 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Copper kettles for the wood stove[;)]
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    JohnnylikesgunsJohnnylikesguns Member Posts: 2,887 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Set the lawn sprinkler up to spray on the woodstove. You'll get lotas moisture and save your cast iron kettle from rusting.

    Next question please.

    Free answers limit 2 per day please.
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,657 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you boil eggs in the water you will save the Polar bears by reducing your carbon footprint. The pan will still be ruined but it will be a noble sacrifice.
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    cahascahas Member Posts: 4,064
    edited November -1
    dcon12,such wonderful advice here>you have nothing to add????
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    zipperzapzipperzap Member Posts: 25,057
    edited November -1
    Never, never, never let water sit in a cast iron anything ... unless you like that rusty taste!
    [:D]
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    tccoxtccox Member Posts: 7,379 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    As some here have almost touched on, you season your skillet by burning a thin coat of fat to carbon which seasons the skillet. Most advise that you never use water to clean said skillet.

    Your kettle is whole nuther thing. It is not seasoned and has water in it constantly. It is just going to rust! However at such a slow rate, it will probably outlast you. Tom
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    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    For one thing, if you let the stove go out, never have water in the pot. Pour it out and let it dry before you let the stove go out.
    Cast iron kettles (and cookwear) have been used for centuries. The pots and pans get seasoned, the tea kettles get scoured if rusty. Use sand, baking soda, or wood ashes to remove whatever rust you can, then rinse and dry.
    Plain, not painted, cast iron rust is actually good for you. It's IRON! Just always use fresh water and not water that has sat in the kettle for any length of time.
    I use a 200 year old tetsubin to boil water for my tea. The new ones are ceramic lined and you have to be careful using them, but the old ones are indestructible if you follow these simple rules.
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    pickenuppickenup Member Posts: 22,844 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We kept one sitting on the heater year round, for that purpose.
    We rusted a few out, despite our best efforts.

    Finally changed to big coffee cans.
    They rust out quicker, but are easy to replace.

    Short of "seasoning" it every time it gets empty, we couldn't find anything that worked over the long haul.

    If it is an heirloom..........
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    minitruck83minitruck83 Member Posts: 5,369
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by p3skyking

    Plain, not painted, cast iron rust is actually good for you.




    That's what my Aunt Julie used to tell me about burned pinto beans. [}:)][B)]

    [:D]
    Allen
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