.

Question about Auto-Ordinance Thompsons

Rack OpsRack Ops Member Posts: 18,593 ✭✭✭
edited October 2008 in General Discussion
Anyone know why the SBRs are so much more expensive?

http://www.auto-ordnance.com/PA-1A.html

Comments

  • Laredo LeftyLaredo Lefty Member Posts: 13,437 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Probably because they require special registration with the Feds and that requires a bunch of cash.
  • KEVD18KEVD18 Member Posts: 15,037
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Laredo Lefty
    Probably because they require special registration with the Feds and that requires a bunch of cash.


    but it says right on the item page that the buyer must pay the tax stamp, which leads me to believe that it isnt included in the increased price.

    so basically, they are just charging mor ebecause they can.
  • dcinffxvadcinffxva Member Posts: 2,830 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Agreed. The difference is $200.00 between the base models. Either the trasnfer fee they have to pay, or just "hassle" fee.
  • competentonecompetentone Member Posts: 4,651 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Rack Ops
    Anyone know why the SBRs are so much more expensive?

    http://www.auto-ordnance.com/PA-1A.html



    It costs money to maintain the licenses to manufacture NFA weapons.

    And I'm sure Auto Ordnance's liability insurance company upped their premium when they were informed that Auto Ordnance was going to sell NFA weapons.

    Additionally, there is the "economies of scale" issue. If they make just a few SBRs, the manufacturing, marketing, sale and distribution costs can be higher on a per-unit basis than costs on the higher production numbers of the non-SBR Thompsons.
  • Rack OpsRack Ops Member Posts: 18,593 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by competentone
    Additionally, there is the "economies of scale" issue. If they make just a few SBRs, the manufacturing, marketing, sale and distribution costs can be higher on a per-unit basis than costs on the higher production numbers of the non-SBR Thompsons.


    I wouldn't think that would be an issue.

    Aren't the SBRs the same gun....with a shorter barrel?

    It just doesn't seem like it would be that much of a difference to me
  • slipgateslipgate Member Posts: 12,741
    edited November -1
    Buy the full size and then buy the shorter barrel and make your own. It is the same NFA fees.
  • Rack OpsRack Ops Member Posts: 18,593 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by slipgate
    Buy the full size and then buy the shorter barrel and make your own. It is the same NFA fees.


    I wonder if it would be cheaper to buy the Thompson pistol (damn, it looks bad *! [:)]) and put a buttstock on it.


    Sportsman's guide also has the Thompson kits for $600...I think I'd only need a receiver and a tax stamp.
  • odenthevikingodentheviking Member Posts: 523 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Did you notice that they sell an extra barrel for just over $200? You could get the SBR permit then have the extra barrel put on.
    Also, if you want the shorter barrel, they are again offereing the Thompson in a "Pistol" mdl. Same price range as the rifle mdl.

    And while we are talking Thompsons..... I noticed some of these mdls say "50 rd Drum Only". Does this mean that they offer/sell this way only or that you can not buy a stick mag and make it work? Will the M-1 mdl not take a drum? Will the older sub-MG mags fit these new Thompsons? I really like the look of a 20 rd mag!
    Thanks, Paul.
  • givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Rack Ops
    quote:Originally posted by slipgate
    Buy the full size and then buy the shorter barrel and make your own. It is the same NFA fees.


    I wonder if it would be cheaper to buy the Thompson pistol (damn, it looks bad *! [:)]) and put a buttstock on it.


    Sportsman's guide also has the Thompson kits for $600...I think I'd only need a receiver and a tax stamp.


    No. Don't get the AO pistol variant, the "boss" that the stock bolts onto, (or in the case of the M1927 slides onto) is scaled down..I guess to satisfy ATF that it can't be readily converted to a SBR by adding a stock.

    You will notice most 18" barrel semi Thompsons have the bolt-on type stock. OK for the US Army thompsons..but you will need a stock that has the little "pushbutton" on the wrist to facilitate quick removal if you want a M1927 style gun. I'll be back with a few photos to explain. Photos for explaination of differences only.
    Note: if you want the GI issue M1A1 semi Thompson, then you're good to go with only a barrel swap (after NFA approval). Best, Joe

    EDIT:
    Here's a photo of a 18" semi Thompson. The stock is not M1927..it's the M1a1 stock. Will get back with the M1927 stock. Joe
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=111203895
    EDIT 2:
    Here's a photo of an 18" semi Thompson. The stock is M1927. And you would normally have to get mags for the gun. Initial price is costly, but it has two 50rd drums!
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=111337800#PIC
  • cce1302cce1302 Member Posts: 9,880
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Rack Ops
    quote:Originally posted by competentone
    Additionally, there is the "economies of scale" issue. If they make just a few SBRs, the manufacturing, marketing, sale and distribution costs can be higher on a per-unit basis than costs on the higher production numbers of the non-SBR Thompsons.


    I wouldn't think that would be an issue.

    Aren't the SBRs the same gun....with a shorter barrel?

    It just doesn't seem like it would be that much of a difference to me

    It's a bureaucratic joke. Lots of red tape to make it look like they care about reducing crime, when in reality all they're doing is making it difficult for those of us who follow the law to have a certain type of desirable gun, and increasing revenue. Also, it allows them their little power trip.
  • TxsTxs Member Posts: 18,801
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Laredo Lefty
    Probably because they require special registration with the Feds and that requires a bunch of cash.Funny thing...I remember back in the Colt SP-1 days you could buy a full-auto capable M16 for less.

    That enormous $200 tax on top of it's $300 purchase price stood in my way. Wish I knew then what I know now. [B)]
  • Rack OpsRack Ops Member Posts: 18,593 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ok. Here's a Thompson for $800

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=111634258


    I can buy a short barrel for $200 and my tax stamp for another $200

    So am I correct in assuming that I can have my very own short-barreled Tommy Gun for $1200 give or take?

    I just find it strange that buying it directly as an SBR would cost me an extra grand
  • givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by givette
    Yep. The Semi-auto version of the USGI M1A1 Thompson (depicted) will involve only a barrel swap. It will not take "C" or "L" drums, however, just 30rd vertical mags. Good luck! Joe

    EDIT:
    So, you are looking for a barrel?
    http://www.e-gunparts.com/product.asp?chrProductSKU=516460&MC=
Sign In or Register to comment.