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Installing Felt

cbxjeffcbxjeff Member Posts: 17,506 ✭✭✭✭
edited June 2016 in General Discussion
A few years ago there was a discussion on applying new felt to a wooden tool chest. I have used spray-on contact cement with only fair results. One shot in placing the felt exactly where is should be. I know Gerstner uses animal glue but has anyone used other glues with success? The ability to move the felt slightly for a good fit is what I need.

Thanks guys,
It's too late for me, save yourself.

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    Okie MomOkie Mom Member Posts: 1,234 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Interested to know what others say as I'm refinishing my grandfather's old wood tool box and want to put something in the drawers.
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    CaptFunCaptFun Member Posts: 16,678 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Have you ever tried the flocking kits?
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    wpageabcwpageabc Member Posts: 8,760 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Contact cement...
    "What is truth?'
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    Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member, Moderator Posts: 66,368 ******
    edited November -1
    use double sided tape instead.
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    That is pouring like an avalanche
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    kidthatsirishkidthatsirish Member Posts: 6,981 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    3m makes a headliner spray on adhesive.
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    brier-49brier-49 Member Posts: 7,061 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Back when I recovered pool tables I used rubber cement.
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    iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,860 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Most brands of aerosol 'contact' glues usually have two different methods printed on the can; 1) spray both items to be glued and wait for them to dry then put them together (note there is no positioning offered), or, 2) spray one item (felt in this case) and place it on the other item. This method allows for positioning. Once it's in place, wait for the glue to 'dry' (solvents to evaporate).

    3M 77 Bond allows for both methods.
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    cbxjeffcbxjeff Member Posts: 17,506 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the advice guys.
    It's too late for me, save yourself.
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    fideaufideau Member Posts: 11,894 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I buy felt that has a peel and stick backing. Refinished a Lane cedar chest for my daughter that had shelves inside, worked very well. I might would add some rubber cement to corners for a tool chest though.
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    andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 10,728 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 on the double sided tape. You can lay a line of it around the full perimeter, plus any area in the middle. It will hold well but let you pull up the felt if you need, such as when something gets spilled in the drawer and you want to replace the felt. [:)]
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    CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    3M 77. Use cardboard to block from spraying areas you don't want felted, lay the felt, and trim excess.
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
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    woodshed87woodshed87 Member Posts: 23,478 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well You Don't Have to be Nasty About it[:o)]quote:Originally posted by CaptFun
    Have you ever tried the flocking kits?
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    1BigGuy1BigGuy Member Posts: 4,033 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Why not apply your adhesive, and carefully lay in an over-sized piece of felt, than carefully use a new exacto type blade to trim the excess?
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