In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

Marlin model 60

338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
edited September 2008 in Ask the Experts
I was in in a shop yesterday looking at two Marlin model 60's. One was a newer model and had a shorter mag tube under the barrel. Has Marlin gone politically correct and limited the new model 60's to ten rounds?

Chris8161
Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof!

Comments

  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My nephew recent was given a new marlin model 60 semi-auto .22 rifle. He is only 5 years old so the stock is too long for him. I have looked online for a shorter stock for the marlin and can't seem to find anything. Is there a smaller stock made for the marlin or do i just need to buy and replacement and modify it until he gets a little bigger and if so where is the cheapest stock i can find. Thanks
  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My .22 is acting up on me. I can't get more than a few shots fired before it jams. Typically, the spent shell isn't ejected properly and it interferes with the new round. I'm using Remington ammo, and I've cleaned & oiled the weapon.
    Anybody got any ideas?
    GH1[:)]
  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When looking for parts for a Marlin model 60 I notice they have new style and old style. How can I tell if I have a old style or new style? Thanks for any help. Terrill.
  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a marlin model 60 and the firing pin is just barely hitting the rim of the shell, most of the time not well enough to ignite, any ideas or suggestions would be a big help.
    Thanks,
    Chuck.
  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a glenfield model 60. Had it for about 25 years.

    After resting it for the last 10 years I took it out to give to my son for a B-day present.

    It would fire but repeatedly jammed so I had a friend look at it. All the parts looked really good, very little wear for a 25 year old gun except the tabs were the lifter contacted the feedthroat. They broke with very little contact when I sdtarted to inspect it in detail.

    I called marlin and gave em the serial number and was sent the new model feedthroat. I wasnt told that I needed the conversion kit but after trying to modify the feedthroat realized it wouldnt work so I got the conversion kit and breech bolt ( from brownells, marlin and numrich didnt seem to care much and were NOT helpful )

    My problem is that the older model has two mounting posts on one side and one on the other. The new model has two on each side.

    When I purchased the initial feedthroat. It appeared to be very close and so we grinded down the one post but the action would freeze up ( when attempting to simply pull the bolt manually ) so I assumed that it was the wrong feedthroat.

    Hence the second purchase of the whole Kit. The new kit came with the feedthroat. The ejector bar and spring and the breech bolt.

    The new feedthroat is exactly like the first one I purchased. Two mounting posts on each side.

    So do I grind this one down also and try and get it to work or Do I purchase the new plates also ??

    I have spent enough already to almost buy a new ruger 1022 or a really good used model 60 and am trying to decide if I should send the parts back and do just that but hate to throw away an old friend that I had planned to give to my son.
  • Options
    GrasshopperGrasshopper Member Posts: 16,824 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Squirrel stock,(old model) bolt hold open device/new;; I think[:I]nambu
  • Options
    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello I don't know all the difference But on early rifle the Ejector was part of a block that had 2 half's and was chromed plated soft metal of some kind. The ejector would wear quickly so then there was a change to a wire insert into the left half to at as the ejector . This wire was hardened steel and lasted much better. There might be many other changes That I don't know about so IF I need more information I would check with the TECH department at BROWNELLS or MIDWAY OR GUNPARTS INC.
  • Options
    rdc5rdc5 Member Posts: 986 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by mm8nambu
    Squirrel stock,(old model) bolt hold open device/new;; I think[:I]nambu


    I believe this is right[8D]
  • Options
    BOBBYWINSBOBBYWINS Member Posts: 7,810
    edited November -1
    Squirrel stock is a Glenfield.

    Made by Marlin.

    Sold by one of the department or hardware stores.I can't remember which one now.[:I]

    BW
  • Options
    lcdrdanrlcdrdanr Member Posts: 439 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I know Glenfields were available new from K-Mart, bought one from them in the late 70's.
    Earlier model 60's had a front sight held on with a slip on band, later ones are drilled and tapped.
    As with any firearm in production as long as this one I am sure there are many other differences

    Dan R
  • Options
    Emmett DunhamEmmett Dunham Member Posts: 1,418 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    One of the major difference is the magazine, the newer model had a dove tail on the front of the barrel with a mount in it to hold the magazine. I remember there just being bracket clipped on the barrel holding the magazine on the front of the older rifle, mine is burried in the safe maybe next time. The reason they changed the design was if you hit the magazine on something the clip could move around on the barrel.



    Emmett
  • Options
    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rdc5
    quote:Originally posted by mm8nambu
    Squirrel stock,(old model) bolt hold open device/new;; I think[:I]nambu


    I believe this is right[8D]

    Yup, its right.

    There have also been a few other changes over the many many years that this gun has been in production (ie since 1959). Newer ones have shorter barrels and magazine tubes.

    Considering that used Marlin 60s are plentiful (this is literally the most popular .22 gun in the world, with millions produced) and can be found for as little as $75, it may not be worth it trying for too much gunsmithing or repair.
  • Options
    338magnut338magnut Member Posts: 764 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Appreciate the info from everyone. Best Regards Terrill.
Sign In or Register to comment.