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Desert Eagle .357

cahascahas Member Posts: 4,064
edited September 2008 in Ask the Experts
A friend of mine bought his buddy by that had a pistol and revolver for sale. Pistol was (never handled one of there before) a Desert Eagle .357, was the big one with 6" barrel. Looked to be in good cond, no scratches, just some ordinary wear. I did not write any #,s down. Price $600, sounded fair too me. Revolver was a S&W model 65-2 in fair to good cond. Price was $300. Am more interested in Desert Eagle and need an opinion or two on these .

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    GrasshopperGrasshopper Member Posts: 16,824 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Eagles are a nice toy to have, as you know heavy, but the two that I have had functioned fine and resale is still in that area you are buying,,imo,,of course..nambu
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    As the previous poster noted it's more of a toy then a practical handgun. Years ago I had one of the early production models, S.N. #4001.
    It weighed 4 lbs with a loaded magazine. Only would work with very hot and expensive .357 loads, (jacketed bullets only). Big and very bulky, like toting a anvil. If you buy it be sure and test fire it for function, it's gas operated. If the the gas tube has been obstructed by bullet debris, operation is severally compromised.
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    BHAVINBHAVIN Member Posts: 3,490 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had an early one as well. Fun to shoot but as Rufe pointed out it took Hot loads to function and Jacketed bullets only. Lead bullets will clog the gas port and it will have to be returned to the factory to get cleaned out. The price isn't bad. I would check to see exactly what he has been firing in it.
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    royc38royc38 Member Posts: 2,236 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you want a .357 auto that you can actually use, look at the Coonan .357 auto. It is a very nice gun. It is accurate, reliable, and you can actually use it for CCW. Usually I don't carry any of mine for that on a regular basis, but I do have a Miami classic holster for it that I can carry it with and it is no more noticeable than a 1911.
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    COLTCOLT Member Posts: 12,637 ******
    edited November -1
    ...If "Big One" means it's like the MK nineteen(?..I forget) size wise and the .44 & .50AE...it's just a novelty...I had the.44mag.

    Very cool handgun, looks cool, great to show around to people, but, that is about the best I can say for it. He he...place the puppy in a holster and walk around with it for awhile, the "tactical" type leg holsters are the best...but man, it's still way heavy.

    ...Big mama-jama and heavy, with a BIG grip! I changed out to Hogue grips , ouch $$$!!! One can buy about any set of Hogue grips for $15-$25 bucks...but oh no not for DE products! It seems Hogue and DE have an agreement that the Hogue grips for the DE line of guns can only be bought from DE...less that has changed in the last 3 or so years...and the Hogues are $50+ bucks + shipping.

    IF by chance you get your finger in the way of the bolt and you release the slide into battery...say bye-bye to your now detached finger part.

    ...Mine was finicky, it was perfect for an entire box or two, then MF's out the wazoo; no matter the brand ammo it was fed...[;)]

    ani-texas-flag-2.gif
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    Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,546 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by royc38
    If you want a .357 auto that you can actually use, look at the Coonan .357 auto. It is a very nice gun. It is accurate, reliable, and you can actually use it for CCW. Usually I don't carry any of mine for that on a regular basis, but I do have a Miami classic holster for it that I can carry it with and it is no more noticeable than a 1911.

    royce38 is correct.

    I have one of each, and the Coonan is much more reliable. You can even get a softer recoil spring for the Coonan to reliably fire 38 special ammo.

    I still like the DE, however, and with the reddot on it, it is a fairly accurate piece out over 50 yards. The weight tames the recoil of the 357 mag quite well.

    Arsenel002.jpg

    The Coonan is simply a nicely made 1911 style pistol, functional, accurate, and a little unique.

    IMG_1130.jpg
    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
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    royc38royc38 Member Posts: 2,236 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Don:

    What kind of spring did you use for the .38 special? None of mine came with the .38 spring. When I shoot .38 specials I kind of work it like a pump.
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    Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,546 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Royc38:

    Both springs came with the pistol, which I bought used. I'll check the manual tonight to see if there is any reference to spring rate, etc.

    Regards,

    Don

    Royce38:

    Sorry for the delay. I spaced looking for the info.

    The manual states that the .38 Special spring is a '12 lb spring' I assume that this is the spring rate, 12 lbs. per inch. It feels right, but I do not have an accurate way to measure it.

    The .38 special spring uses a slight smaller wire, is wrapped at the same number of turns per inch, and is about 3/4" longer than the .357 Magnum spring.

    The manual suggest +P loads until the pistol is broken in. I have put +P, Federal FMJ and Hydro-shock .38 special through it with the softer spring, and all have cycled fine.

    It does not cycle the 'Reduced Recoil' .38 special rounds that are available.
    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
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