In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

Mauser C-96 Bolo

Manoa-FishermanManoa-Fisherman Member Posts: 190 ✭✭✭
edited January 2012 in Ask the Experts
I have a beat up Bolo Mauser with little bluing, faint rifling in the barrell and rattles a little when shaken. However, it does function and was wondering if it would worth restoring (ie. rebluing, new liner or rebore to 9mm, etc.). For example, one of the few gunsmiths that works on C-96 barrels charges $175 to re-line or $400 to rebore.

Comments

  • Options
    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I wouldn't be putting any kind of big money into a broom handle just to upgrade it into a shooter. Leave it factory original so that it's collectors value will be preserved. There weren't that many bolo's made in the first place. Even a beat up one as you describe, if factory original will go up in value over time.

    My experience using broom handles as shooters was never positive in the past. They always shot high at short range and the hammer would do a number on my hand if I choked up on the grip. They are way overrated as shooters, IMHO. Leave yours original. You will never get your money out of upgrading it, unless you have it restored to factory original condition by a pro, which is very expensive.
  • Options
    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Without actually seeing the condition of yours it's hard to make a determination.
    I would not reblue it in any case. If you have little or no pitting, it's a very good candidate for relining.
    I have two C-96's and one Bolo that I had relined to the original 7.63. This involves sending the barrel extention and bolt to the reliner so he can headspace it. In one gun, I even had the chamber relined and it shoots great. It is extrememly difficult to tell that a barrel has been relined on these, so it can do nothing but increase the value of it.
  • Options
    SpartacusSpartacus Member Posts: 14,415
    edited November -1
    i agree with both of the above, to a point.
    unless it's an already collectible condition gun, which it's not. then it needs to be shot.
    as mentioned, they are not the most accurate of guns, but they're a blast to shoot and always attract attention at the range.
    it's not a gun you will shoot a lot, so i wouldn;t worry about relining or restoring, unless you go top dollar. a guy named "thor" used to do turnbull like resto's for lugers and broomhandles. look for him at the luger forum at gunboards.
    i don't think you should fire it if it rattles w/o having it looked at by a gunsmith first.
    make sure its functional and safe, then shoot it and leave it out on the coffee table so your gun buddies can see it when they visit.[:D]
    jmho

    tom
  • Options
    Manoa-FishermanManoa-Fisherman Member Posts: 190 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thank you for your comments and recommendations. I guess I should run it down to the range to see how it shoots. Otherwise, it is a good conversation piece and impressive paper weight.
  • Options
    gruntledgruntled Member Posts: 8,218 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had mine (One of the very early ones imported from China)rebarreled in 7,63. There is a very noticeable line where the new barrel was screwed in. They were supposed to leave the barrel in the white but somehow they messed up & redid the entire gun. Polished, reblued, remarked, new springs & grips.
    When I went to pick it up they tried to charge me for all that.
    NO WAY! I had the original work order & the price of just over $100 & that was all I was going to pay. It took a lot of discussion/yelling with at least three different people but that was how it wound up. I could look up the paperwork but I'm guessing that was around twenty years ago. I seriously doubt the pistol would be worth now what they wanted to charge me then.

    Note: My barrel was replaced, not relined. The price listed for reboring isn't all that much more than I paid to rebarrel mine considering how long it's been. The 9MM conversion is far more though. When I had mine done the 9MM barrel was only $10 more.
  • Options
    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    This is the guy that does my work. You really DON'T see any seam after relining.

    www.redmansrifling.com/mauser.htm

    The turnaround is rapid also.
  • Options
    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by gruntled
    I had mine (One of the very early ones imported from China)rebarreled in 7,63. There is a very noticeable line where the new barrel was screwed in. They were supposed to leave the barrel in the white but somehow they messed up & redid the entire gun. Polished, reblued, remarked, new springs & grips.
    When I went to pick it up they tried to charge me for all that.
    NO WAY! I had the original work order & the price of just over $100 & that was all I was going to pay. It took a lot of discussion/yelling with at least three different people but that was how it wound up. I could look up the paperwork but I'm guessing that was around twenty years ago. I seriously doubt the pistol would be worth now what they wanted to charge me then.

    Note: My barrel was replaced, not relined. The price listed for reboring isn't all that much more than I paid to rebarrel mine considering how long it's been. The 9MM conversion is far more though. When I had mine done the 9MM barrel was only $10 more.


    Off topic but you may be interested to know that there is on record one C-96 that was rebarrelled in either Germany or France with a 9mm Parabellum (Luger) barrel. The work that was done was so exacting that the seam is very difficult to find on the gun. I believe it's documented in System Mauser.
Sign In or Register to comment.