In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

357 sig

combatinccombatinc Member Posts: 77 ✭✭
edited September 2014 in Ask the Experts
ok thoughts on the 357 sig round and I narrowed it down to 2 choices the glock 32 gen4 or the sig sp2022 which you can still buy new on GunBroker thoughts everyone ??

Comments

  • Options
    combatinccombatinc Member Posts: 77 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    would like to know what gun would be recommended for the 357 sig round
  • Options
    combatinccombatinc Member Posts: 77 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Does any one have pros or cons on this round? Or has anyone heard of a rifle/carbine that is being designed for it. The specs I have seen look pretty impressive on the round.
  • Options
    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by combatinc
    would like to know what gun would be recommended for the 357 sig round

    For the SIG cartridge, how about a SIG gun? [;)] (EG 226 or 229).

    But I think you're kind of asking the question backwards. The question is what exactly do you want to do with this gun, and then what kind of gun do *YOU* like? Are you going to carry this thing openly? Concealed? Compete with it? Hunt with it? Do you like an external safety? Double-action/single-action? Want a single action/cocked and locked platform?, etc. Answer those things, and you'll have a better handle on what platform to shoot from.

    Pretty much any gun that can run .40SW can run 357 SIG with just a simple barrel swap; the cartridge was designed that way on purpose. And pretty much every modern "service" type gun is designed to handle .40SW nowadays. So there is a pretty wide range of guns you "could" run 357 SIG from, if you were so inclined.

    On the round itself, personally I think its a bit "gimmicky". Yes, you do get close to .357 magnum ballistics with it, and there is some theoretical reliability advantage due to the bottleneck cartridge shape.

    On the other hand, you can get similar ballistics with a .40SW using lightweight bullets (357 SIG, is conceptually like a 40SW necked down to take a 9mm bullet). You can also get most of the way there with the best of the 9mm+P loads. (EG 125 grain 357 SIG gets 1350 FPS, premium 125 grain 9mm+P 1250 fps).

    Both 40SW and 9mm luger are pretty highly reliable from good platforms, so real-world reliablity advantage of 357 SIG may not be there. The 357 SIG rounds are a little harder to find, a little more expensive, and also a bit trickier to reload (if you're so inclined).

    So in my opinion, most shooters aren't going to see much real-world advantage of this over, say a .40SW, or good 9mm luger +P for use as a conventional personal defense round. IMO 357 SIG makes a little more sense as a hunting-type round where the high velocity helps flatten the trajectory.
  • Options
    62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I carried a Sig P-229 .357 Sig as a duty pistol for nearly 15 years. I carried, and still carry, a Sig P-239 .357 Sig for off-duty/plain clothes wear. The combination is utterly reliable, accurate, powerful and has a slightly lighter perceived recoil pulse than the .40 S&W. I have both .40 S&W barrels and .357 Sig barrels for both pistols - the .40 barrels just sit in the safe. The public safety agencies that have gone to the round have been quite satisfied with its performance. Once I discovered the "tricks" involved in loading the .357 Sig it is a piece of cake. The biggest trick is the same I had to use with the .30 Luger and the .256 Winchester - pass the loaded round through a carbide sizing die with the decap spindle removed as the final step. For whatever reason these rounds seem to bulge a little in the seating process and this restores the body diameter.

    The choice of which platform you select for the cartridge has been very well and accurately described by beantown. I, however, believe the .357 Sig serves to fill a gap in the pistol performance profile. Evan Marshall's police shooting studies for years reported the #1 combination for one-shot stops was the 125 grain Federal .357 JHP from a 2 1/2" barrel S&W "K" frame. The .357 Sig duplicates or exceeds the ballistics of this combination and the JHP bullets loaded by the various manufacturers are specific to the cartridge.
  • Options
    rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Glock 40 with a second barrel in 357sig and that is the beauty of it. If you have a 40S&W, all you need is a barrel in 357Sig to be able to shoot it.

    I really like the round for accuracy however as Beantown says, it is a little pricey for factory.

    If you do reload, this is one of the most consistent rounds to reload. I've read articles that even the ammo manufacturers have mentioned what a consistent round it is to load.

    There are proponents and detractors so if you aren't sure, you may want to read up on it before purchasing a gun dedicated to the 357Sig.

    Or as many do, buy a 40S&W and get another barrel.
  • Options
    mango tangomango tango Member Posts: 3,833 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sig Sauer P 229
  • Options
    combatinccombatinc Member Posts: 77 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, i understsnd all about the 2 rounds but main question was more what gun would be best to handle this round reading a lot of forums where a lot of people seem to think you need a steel gun for the round that a polymer will evevtually wear out and second on the round itself there has to be a reason why after testing so many law enforcement agenies are switching from the 9mm to the 357 sig
  • Options
    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by combatinc
    Yes, i understsnd all about the 2 rounds but main question was more what gun would be best to handle this round reading a lot of forums where a lot of people seem to think you need a steel gun for the round that a polymer will evevtually wear out and second on the round itself there has to be a reason why after testing so many law enforcement agenies are switching from the 9mm to the 357 sig


    I see.

    Taking the second thing first, law enforcement agencies often jump on bandwagons, picking whatever is trendy at the time they're equipping their officers. They're also subject to backdoor deals and other political considerations.

    EG, first they go from 38s to 357s. Then there is a public outcry on shooting poor suspects with "magnum" rounds, so they go back to 38s. Then they decide wheelguns are too 19th century, so they go to 9mms. Then 9mm isn't powerful enough so they go to 10mm. But that's too powerful, so now they go to 40SW. The 40SW turns out to be still too powerful for their smaller recruits, so now they gimp it with "reduced recoil" loads that effectively yield 9mm ballistics. Then a SIG salesman comes and tells them that their SIG round is the best thing since sliced bread, and oh by the way, we'll gladly sell you 2000 pistols at a great price, because we know that people go on the internet and decide what gun THEY want to buy based on what the cops are using.

    See here for one amusing example of this sort of switching (Texas State Troopers switch BACK from 357 SIG to 9mm luger, but then have to suspend switch): http://gunssavelives.net/blog/texas-state-troopers-dropping-sig-pistols-in-357-sig-for-sw-pistols-in-9mm/

    The point is, just because some police agencies think that 357 SIG is better for THEM, that doesn't even mean that they're right, let alone that its better for *YOU*. What works for a uniformed police officer carrying openly outdoors, working off public funding, may not necessarily be the best choice for a plain-clothed civilian carrying concealed indoors.

    On the second part, I disagree with the internet "authorities" you cite (of which I'm one too, I suppose!). I've been at this a while, and I've never heard of premature gun failure with 357 SIG guns. Which are these polymer guns that supposedly won't hold up to that round?

    357 SIG has a SAAMI max pressure spec of 40,000 PSI. Compare to 38,500 PSI for 9mm+P luger (which is standard issue for most military and police and has been for quite a long time), and you'll see its really not that much more.

    As another basis for comparison, again, the 357 SIG is basically just a modified 40SW, and most modern polymer guns seem to stand up to 40SW just fine. Remember, the barrel, slide, and other critical parts of these guns are all still made of STEEL. The frame is polymer, yes, but polymer frames actually have some "flex" to them, and they're plenty tough.

    While it probably is true that a 40SW gun won't run quite as long as a similar one in 9mm luger, and it *might* be true that a 357 SIG won't quite as long as a 40SW (not sure about that), in reality any of these should stand up to service lives of tens of thousands of rounds, and probably 99.9% of shooters will never put that many rounds through their individual guns.

    If you are shooting that much, then you're probably a professional shooter or at least serious competitor. At that point, the cost of the gun itself becomes negligible compared to the cost of the actual ammo, and other expenses you're probably incurring. So replacing a whole gun shouldn't be a big deal at that point.

    In short, I don't see any reason why a polymer 357 SIG can't hold up to more rounds than you're ever likely to put through one in a lifetime, assuming the gun was designed right. If you like a polymer gun, and you want 357 SIG, personally I don't see a reason why not to go for it.

    If you want a specific recommendation, check out the SIG 2340 in 357 SIG. That one has been on the market for 15 years. . . I think its probably OK. I'm personally not a big Glock fan, but people do like the Glock 32, they've been around a while, and I've never heard of them failing from normal use.
  • Options
    TxsTxs Member Posts: 18,801
    edited November -1
    Another point to consider when weighing polymer vs. metal framed pistols in .357 SIG is recoil impulse.

    .357 SIG has a noticeably more 'snappy' recoil than the .40 S&W, which is only made worse with a lightweight polymer frame. You can expect that your shot/sight picture recovery times aren't going to be quite as good.

    IMO, .357 SIG and .40 S&W cartridges are both very effective cartridges, with - due to lower frontal area/velocity - the edge going toward .357 SIG when it comes to barrier penetration.

    To give you an idea of this, increased ability to make it through car bodies and windshields is a driving factor behind state highway patrol agencies adopting this round.
  • Options
    ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,663 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a gen 3 Glock 32. For ME it feels like a tiny bit less recoil than similar sized guns in .40. Very accurate and have had zero failures. For cheap practice ammo I've been using PPU and for carry ammo I've been using Hornady Critical Defense and their Custom line with xtp hollowpoints. I don't reload this round and have no interest in doing so. It is definitely an oddball round when compared to 9mm and .45acp but I'm the kind of person who never cared about that (since I also like .41 magnums.) I love the Glock..it's on my hip now.
  • Options
    montanajoemontanajoe Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 58,198 ******
    edited November -1
    SIGPRO 2240,,,.357sig or .40S&W by switching out barrel only.
  • Options
    rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
Sign In or Register to comment.