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Ithaca Model 37

claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
edited October 2014 in Ask the Experts
I have acquired 2 Ithaca Model 37s. I would like to know the year each was made, I believe they are from the early 50s. The first serial number is: 18758x and the other is: 18436x. I appreciate any help you can offer.

Thank you,

John

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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I saw one of these at the gunshow today for like $317 or $371. I think it said Ithaca Model 37 lightweight or something. I love the classic look but i am curious on to how much its really worth ? any insight.
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    shot this used model 37 yesterday for the first time....shell went off and jammed in the barrell...cant pump it to eject the shell, cant get the barrell off either...bought from guy on gun broker that said it had no problems...any suggestions to get the shell out, and, what could have caused this problem in the first place?...bad ejectors?...was using factory winchester 12 guage ammo
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Are the stocks for the ithaca model 37 12 ga 16 ga and 20 ga all have
    the same dimensions?THANK FOR ANY HELP.
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Did the model 37 Military,riot,trench shotgun have the same butt stock length as the others ?
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I just got my old Ithaca superlite model 37 out for a cleaning and realized it seems to "slam fire". I think the old Model 12 Winchesters would also do this. By slam fire, I mean holding the trigger back and cycling the slide it fires when a new shell goes into battery. Am I correct?
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have an Ithaca model 37 ser# 425XXX can anyone tell me the year it was manufactured? Also there is the number 4 beneath the serial number that I was told designates the barrel choke but what barrel choke would 4 be if this is how Ithaca designates the choking. Any help is appreciated.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Correct. There are at least 5 pumps shotguns that will function that way.

    IIRC the Remington 10 and 29 will operate that way. Winchester 97 and 12 plus the Ithaca 37 complete the 5 I know.
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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yep. Winchester 97 would also do that. The Ithaca 37s made up to 1975 would do that- after 1975, some would, some would not.
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    ZinderblocZinderbloc Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some might think "slamfire" was a defect, but it was not. It was done on purpose by the factory, under the belief that the police/military might need a shotgun that will unload all its rounds in a few seconds.

    I once witnessed a shooter nearly kill his buddy when he pumped an Ithaca while holding back the trigger. Lawyers in the 1970's convinced the factories to discontinue this feature. Good riddance, IMO.
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    AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 3,171 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had an uncle who had a 16 ga. 37 for a pheasant gun and he always fired it that way!

    I have several 37's, all but one made from pre-war to 1956 and those will slam-fire. The odd one is a 1982 and it does not slam-fire but, in my opinion, is even more stupid in design: If the trigger is held back when the slide is moved foreward, the hammer rides foreward with the breech block and does not fire but the gun is now uncocked! There is no trigger interrupter as on Remingtons, et al.
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Ambrose
    I had an uncle who had a 16 ga. 37 for a pheasant gun and he always fired it that way!

    I have several 37's, all but one made from pre-war to 1956 and those will slam-fire. The odd one is a 1982 and it does not slam-fire but, in my opinion, is even more stupid in design: If the trigger is held back when the slide is moved foreward, the hammer rides foreward with the breech block and does not fire but the gun is now uncocked! There is no trigger interrupter as on Remingtons, et al.


    So, I guess I will have to load & fire it to find out if the hammer is riding forward.
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    AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 3,171 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    So, I guess I will have to load & fire it to find out if the hammer is riding forward.

    That will work but you can also, with the gun empty, hold the trigger back an slowly ease the slide foreward. You can hear and feel the hammer strike as the action locks if it's an earlier one.
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    claysclays Member Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Ambrose
    So, I guess I will have to load & fire it to find out if the hammer is riding forward.

    That will work but you can also, with the gun empty, hold the trigger back an slowly ease the slide foreward. You can hear and feel the hammer strike as the action locks if it's an earlier one.

    Thanks, I will give that a try
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    TriumphGuyTriumphGuy Member Posts: 37 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It's interesting that firearms designers thought this "feature" was O.K. I would never trust that the breechblock would get fully locked before the hammer lights off the round. I guess there's enough delay in firing pin travel, primer ignition and power burn to keep things together. I would never attempt to do this, even with low pressure shotgun shells. A sear/trigger dis-connector makes any manual repeater work the way's it's supposed to, not silly, dangerous rapid fire mode.
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