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Sykes-Fairbairn knife...continued

sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
edited September 2008 in Ask the Experts
Blackwolf,

Make sure they are made of/with Sheffield Steel. I can't remember the actual name of the knifemaker. But, that is high quality steel.

{Edit:}

Thanks Iceraxe. I knew it had Sheffield steel but wasn't sure it WAS Sheffield who made the knife. I set the box for it aside a while ago.

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    iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,860 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
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    Bill DeShivsBill DeShivs Member Posts: 1,264 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Sheffield steel" is a marketing ploy-no such steel exists.
    BTW- "Sheffield" doesn't make knives-it's a city in England. Sheffield was at one time a quality knifemaking center. Today mostly junk is made there.
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    sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Bill DeShivs
    "Sheffield steel" is a marketing ploy-no such steel exists.
    BTW- "Sheffield" doesn't make knives-it's a city in England. Sheffield was at one time a quality knifemaking center. Today mostly junk is made there.


    Bill,

    It may be a marketing ploy but I can tell you the paperwork with the knife said 'Sheffield Steel' and it is very high quality steel. I got mine through www.armyranger.com . I got it because that was the knife issued during WWII to the Rangers of that time period. The one I have was made about 2002-2003.
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    WerwolfWerwolf Member Posts: 475 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There are still good Sheffield blades made and they are definitely not junk. Yes these are definitely well made carbon steel bladed, brass handled Fairbairn Sykes Commando Knives.
    USMC 3/3
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    BigKev72BigKev72 Member Posts: 37 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Originals will have INOX stamped on the blade. Sheffield is still more than capable of turning out some great steel. Wilkinson Swords are still made there and they are fantastic (issued to the british and many other army's for years)
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    Bill DeShivsBill DeShivs Member Posts: 1,264 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Original F/S knives are not stamped "Inox!"
    You can be sure if it's stamped "Inox" that it's a reproduction.
    I said MOST Sheffield knives are junk-not all.
    The F/S design is specifically a stabbing instrument, so steel quality (other than strength)is not particularly important. The bevel grind angles are not conducive to sharpening.
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    blacarrowblacarrow Member Posts: 424 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The genuine WWII article should be stamped with the British broad arrow mark.
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    iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,860 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Bill DeShivs
    Original F/S knives are not stamped "Inox!"
    I said MOST Sheffield knives are junk-not all.
    The F/S design is specifically a stabbing instrument, so steel quality (other than strength)is not particularly important. The bevel grind angles are not conducive to sharpening.


    It was also designed to be a slitter or slicer.
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    TxsTxs Member Posts: 18,801
    edited November -1
    Nope. The S/F was designed as a sticker. The images of a commando sneaking up and slicing a guard's throat are Hollywood creations.

    Note it's double straight sharpened sufaces all the way out to that very sharp point located in the center of the blade. Slicing blades are designed with a curved cutting surface and upturned tip to maximize power along the cutting edge. This knife is designed to maximize power at the tip.

    If you research you'll see that all WWII training with this knife involved stabbing techniques. The way I've heard it put, the idea was to stick straight in as far as possible and then 'run it around like a 4-speed'. Very effective.
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    sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Sykes-Fairbairn is both a sticker and a cutter. The edges are sharpened up to the curve going toward the tip. The technique used was to grab the chin from behind and either slice the throat or stab through and slice outward. The construction of the blade also allowed it to slip in-between ribs easily. Penetrating to vitals. Slicing along the rib or bone while extracting the knife. The training we received, when I was in, was on the M7 Bayonet used as a hand knife. That was based on the M3 trench knife training which borrowed a lot from the V-42 training. All the above were based on the Sykes-FairBairn commando knife training.
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