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King Arms Co

Lynx74Lynx74 Member Posts: 19 ✭✭
edited January 2012 in Ask the Experts
Can anyone tell me anything about the King Arms rabbit ears 12ga side by side or can tell me where to go to find out anything about this firearm

Thanks

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    Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,713 ******
    edited November -1
    Probably a "trade name" shotgun made by Crescent Firearms in the early 1900's. They would put any retailer's or distributor's names on their guns and there are literally hundreds of trade name brands out there. If it's a "King Nitro", it was made for Shapleigh Hardware Company of St. Louis, Mo.

    It could also be Belgian. Remove the barrels and check the underside of them and the receiver flat for any proofmarks. If you see "ELG" in an oval, it's Belgian.

    Value ranges from $10 if it's only good for a fence post or around $200 if it looks like it just left the factory.
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,210 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Kings Arms is not among the 150 or so names I have collected that were made by Crescent. One poster here says he has over 400 names attributed to Crescent. 'Kingsland Special' and 'Kingsland Ten' (or 10) were made by them.
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    Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,713 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by He Dog
    Kings Arms is not among the 150 or so names I have collected that were made by Crescent. One poster here says he has over 400 names attributed to Crescent. 'Kingsland Special' and 'Kingsland Ten' (or 10) were made by them.

    Here's an old thread with 212 Crescent trade names, including King Nitro:

    http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=262823
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    hrfhrf Member Posts: 857 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Apparently just another trade name used by an anonymous Belgian maker:

    http://boardreader.com/thread/King_Arms_Co_double_barrel_jm9X4wlv.html

    Value will be as a decorator only.
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    Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,713 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by hrf
    Apparently just another trade name used by an anonymous Belgian maker:

    http://boardreader.com/thread/King_Arms_Co_double_barrel_jm9X4wlv.html

    Value will be as a decorator only.

    We used to call those "ABC" guns: "Another Belgian Clunker" [:D]

    Still, proofmarks will tell the tale.
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    Ned FallNed Fall Member Posts: 662
    edited November -1
    Yes, I have listings for over 800 "Trade Brand Names" that were used between 1880 and 1940 with over 450 that were used by Crescent Fire Arms Company of Norwich,CT (1892 to 1930)
    I've spent over 30 years collecting them and there is no KING ARMS Co among them. I also looked through three other books listing foreign names and the name is not to be found there either. That's not to say that there is no such name because you have the gun in front of you don't you? The names that I have with some form of the KING in them are: (name) (maker),
    KING BEE (Stevens), KING HARDWARE CO (Stevens), KING NITRO (W.H. Davenport Arms Co and Iver Johnsons's Arms & Cycle Works), KING NITRO DOUBLE (Stevens), KINGSLAND GUN CO (Crescent ), KINGSLAND SPECIAL (Crescent), KINGSLAND TEN STAR (Crescent) and KINGSLAND 10 STAR (Crescent). I have to ask this question, no offense intended, Are you sure you are reading the name correctly? Please take a look at the bottom of the barrels under the forearm for any proof marks. European made guns will have them,American made guns don't. Belgian made guns will have the letters "ELG" in an oval while English made guns will have crossed scepters or halberds (spear/battle axe) with letters in the intersectionsand a crown on top. It has been said that Crescent Fire Arms Company would make as few as twelve guns with some selected name on them as long as the buyer paid for the die needed to stamp the name on the gun. Not all of these names were ever recorded. I find at least one new (?) unknown name a month.
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    Lynx74Lynx74 Member Posts: 19 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for all the responces all very helpfull Ned looks like you do a lot of research on these things and it says KING ARMS CO i will have to look for the proofs latter will let you know again thanks guys
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    Ned FallNed Fall Member Posts: 662
    edited November -1
    O.K. Thanks. I'll be waiting for your results. A photo would be nice if possible.
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    Lynx74Lynx74 Member Posts: 19 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ned only other things i see on it is a Ser# i guess 217035 on the barrel and reciever and it says genuine armour steel choke bored on the barrel and thats all thats on it no other markings at all
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    Ned FallNed Fall Member Posts: 662
    edited November -1
    Well, it looks as if I've found the second unknown of the month, the first was a JEFFERSON ARMS CO RICHMOND,VA and that one was made by Crescent Fire Arms Company. GENUINE ARMORY STEEL CHOKE BORED were markings used by Crescent but they were also used by Meriden Fire Arms Company as well. Meriden in business from 1905 to 1915 was not noted for making many "Trade Brand Names". If it is Crescent made and I'm going to credit or blame them and is an outside hammer type, the gun was made in 1909. No matter who made it, a word of caution. The gun was designed and made using the technology and metallurgy of the times and for the ammunition in use back then which was 2 1/2 inch shells loaded with black powder and lead shot. It was not designed or made for more modern 3 inch or magnum shells loaded with high pressure smokeless powder or steel shot. My recommendation is don't attempt to shoot the gun. but if you insist, have your life insurance paid up, have a few fingers or an eye to spare , please have the gun inspected by a good competent gunsmith first and then use only appropriate ammunition.
    Value? Value of any of these old guns depends on its condition, the amount of original finish remaining on the metal and wood as well as the mechanical condition. These guns were inexpensive (read cheap) even when new selling for between $15 and $25 and haven't appreciated much since. A prime condition example (rare) that appears to have come out of the factory yesterday afternoon might bring as much as $150 while a rusty rotten incomplete piece of junk fit only for parts salvage or as a fire place poker might bring as little as $10.
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