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Help ID tiny Spanish top break revolver

11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
edited January 2012 in Ask the Experts
Friend has an unknown that was brought to his shop. At first glance, thought it was a New Baby Hammerless- but it is not. Blued top break revolver, folding trigger, cal 6.35mm, there is a circular logo of a bull on the left side, and same logo on the grips. Internet search got 5 hits on a Vahca revolver, but these were all for the same ONE revolver for sale at different times- and I think Vahca is a mid-read of MARCA REGISTRADA which IS on the frame and grips (that gun, by the way, belonged to Gary Burghoff- Radar of MASH) Butt is marked SPAIN, and it does have the Spanish proofs for a revolver. Pretty sure this IS a .25 ACP, and not a .22 Velo-dog (cylinder too short for Velo) and it IS a centerfire.

Anyone with a clue for this mystery? And yes, been thru the Spanish guns on littlegun.net. Yes, I know pictures would help- but do not have them right now.

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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Gabiondo & Co." was the only Spanish manufacturer I could find that used a bull trade mark similar to the one you describe. They were much better known for making "Ruby Type" pistols though. Perhaps my reference is in error, regarding the bull trade mark? If you describe the Spanish proof marks accurately,it might be possible to date the revolver from them.
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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Rufe- I think "Gabilando is it, Found a listing for a "velo-dog" style of theirs in 6.35, 1904-1914. Thanx!
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 11b6r
    Rufe- I think "Gabilando is it, Found a listing for a "velo-dog" style of theirs in 6.35, 1904-1914. Thanx!



    1904-1914 wouldn't be correct for Spanish proof marks. Spain didn't make proof marks mandatory until after the First World War, circa mid 20's.

    One of the proofs should be a coded date, likely we could pin it down that way.
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