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Mauser K98 bolt assembly?

Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,615 ✭✭✭✭
edited December 2014 in Ask the Experts
Anyone ever notice this?

When assembling a custom Mauser k98 bolt I can stop one thread revolution short of screwing the bolt together, place the bolt in the gun and it operates normally loading and ejecting shells EXCEPT the firing pin don't protrude from the bolt face when the trigger is pulled.

Wondering if any other similar bolts such as Ruger, etc, might do the same or anyone else noticed this about Mauser bolts. This K98 bolt looks to be original except for a Mark type safety and custom bolt handle too allow for scope mounting.

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    MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,986 ******
    edited November -1
    the m-98 has a VERY positive lock on the bolt 'shroud', most other commercial actions just use a small 'divot' in the bolt body to hold the cocking piece in place. Or like the Win. m-70 and springfiel 03 a much smaller lock that will only engage on the last rotation.
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    chiefrchiefr Member Posts: 13,909 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, that should be correct if you are talking about a German Mauser original Gew 98, K 98 and variants, but you may want to measure firing pin protrusion as some may vary if you worry about a discharge.

    I would rather use the floor plate to unload the rifle. Can't say with certainty it can be done with Ruger, WW or commercial actions.
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    Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,615 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes about firing pin protrusion. The firing pin was kinda light at .035 and specs were something like .050 to .065 so I set it at .060 and tested all as ok. When doing the final clean-up I put the bolt together, rotated it to check the pin protrusion and noticed it was flush with the bolt face and the pin was snapped in for a bolt lock at the minus 1 turn in. Out of curiosity I inserted the bolt into the gun went out side and loaded the gun with a dummy round that only had a live primer and pulled the trigger and sure enough snap I then tested chambering and ejecting live rounds fed from the magazine.
    Rotated the bolt one more turn to final home position and tested again as all ok with .060 protrusion.
    Moral of story. the bolt can be assembled and will chamber and unload live rounds but incorrect firing pin protrusion.
    The headspace has been properly set by a qualified gunsmith who installed a custom 243 barrel that is very very accurate and shoots a max load at high velocity. When I noticed the firing pin protrusion at less than minimum recommended the gunsmith indicated he did not gauge the firing pin protrusion but did test fire the gun and checked chambering and ejection as ok.

    I watch some of the other similar bolts for this issue in the future when I'm assembling them.

    Just glad I was not being charged by the enemy while it was snapping and no fix bayonet attachment for defense or being charged by a big monstrous racked deer. (and no one to blame but myself)

    About unloading thru the floor plate. I installed a Gibbs 243 clip in place of the floor plate and it operates great. Cannot locate another spare Gibbs clip reasonable. If I would have had any idea the Gibbs conversion clip was a good choice I would have bought another at the time.
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    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Okie743,

    We used to use this approach with students intentionally twice during the curriculum. Once when we were trying to teach function and diagnostics and second when we wanted to demonstrate flinch at the range.

    Best.
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    Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,615 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've done the empty chamber load for kids and grandkids also when teaching them not to flinch.
    I've also seen some grown ups almost turn over the shooting bench with their eyes closed when I done such to their big manly magnums that they were so proud of and could not shoot decent groups. The grown ups don't think it's very funny, but I've got a son that is a very good shot and I still do the dry chamber to him every once in awhile when he is testing my reloads in his guns and he remains rock steady during the snap and keeps his eyes open.
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