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Gun Dipped in Salt Water

Dr.NippsDr.Nipps Member Posts: 642 ✭✭✭✭
edited January 2015 in Ask the Experts
I have a Remington 870 express. It wasn't dropped in the salt water but the wave were crashing on the deck of the boat soaking the cases. Last time wasn't as bad so I wiped it down with a wet rag then cleaned as usual. Is this good enough or should I be doing something else too? Also what about using sweet's 7.62?

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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If it were mine I'd rip it apart and wash it in boiling distilled water. It will dry itself if you leave it in long enough to get the metal hot. Then a nice spray with WD-40, wipe the parts down with clean dry rag. Lightly oil up with something good, Break-Free ClP, Rem Oil...

    added I have had great luck using WD-40 and then wiping it off. CLP on a patch for wipe down thin film and a drop or two in places for oiling.
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    Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    If it were mine I'd make sure all of the salt was off every part, metal & wood. this would involve disassembly and thorough cleaning.
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    Ditch-RunnerDitch-Runner Member Posts: 24,778 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    agree tear down rinse with hot water clean and oil it 870 come apart easy enough
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    nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Salt air" alone is sufficient to rust unprotected steel. That's why those who work on the water prefer a "marine" finish:

    winchesterstainless.jpg

    Neal
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Dr.Nipps,

    I totally agree with some of the other's that a total disassembly and cleaning is warranted. After that, a light coating with Breakfree CLP, or something like Chromate's 4 in 1-Plus, by Red Lion, would do the perfect job. Yes WD-40 has been in service for years, but it actually does not displace water.

    Best
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    Horse Plains DrifterHorse Plains Drifter Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 39,553 ***** Forums Admin
    edited November -1
    Agree with Charlie.
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    Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    WD-40 does not displace water.

    Best


    It's not the water that needs to get displaced, it's the salt. Cleaning the gun using blackpowder techniques will dissolve the salt.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Ray B
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    WD-40 does not displace water.

    Best


    It's not the water that needs to get displaced, it's the salt. Cleaning the gun using blackpowder techniques will dissolve the salt.


    quote:Dr.Nipps,

    I totally agree with some of the other's that a total disassembly and cleaning is warranted. After that, a light coating with Breakfree CLP, or something like Chromate's 4 in 1-Plus, by Red Lion, would do the perfect job. Yes WD-40 has been in service for years, but it actually does not displace water.

    Best

    Ray B,

    What part of that in red, did you not comprehend? If you are going to quote me, quote the WHOLE thing, not bits and pieces.

    Best

    EDIT 1

    Ray B,

    Yes, the black powder method with Hot water, and soap, will do everything you want to do, except protect, and lubricate. From experience in the field, the WD-40, does not displace water...it sits on top. It has no surfactants to help it penetrate water...its main ingredient is fish oil. It has been used for decades, mostly satisfactorily. I was just trying to point out to Charlie, there is something that is better for the protect, and lubricate. That is the 4 in 1 Plus, marketed by Chromate.

    Best
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    Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    Dr.Nipps,

    I totally agree with some of the other's that a total disassembly and cleaning is warranted. After that, a light coating with Breakfree CLP, or something like Chromate's 4 in 1-Plus, by Red Lion, would do the perfect job. Yes WD-40 has been in service for years, but it actually does not displace water.

    Best


    Not disagreeing with the first sentence, however your second sentence regarding Water Displacement-40 is not completely relevant because displacing the water is not the issue, removing the salt is.

    Are your little feelers better now??
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    competentonecompetentone Member Posts: 4,698 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965



    Yes, the black powder method with Hot water, and soap, will do everything you want to do, except protect, and lubricate. From experience in the field, the WD-40, does not displace water...it sits on top. It has no surfactants to help it penetrate water...its main ingredient is fish oil. It has been used for decades, mostly satisfactorily. I was just trying to point out to Charlie, there is something that is better for the protect, and lubricate. That is the 4 in 1 Plus, marketed by Chromate.



    I don't mean to high-jack this thread trying to turn it into a WD-40 debate, but you destroy a good bit of your credibility when you repeat old WD-40 myths that have been debunked for a long time: http://wd40.com/cool-stuff/myths-legends-fun-facts

    The "WD" in "WD-40" is for Water-Displacing. I'm not sure what you are expecting or what your experience was, but its water displacing action is proven in both the laboratory and in the field.

    For the original poster's situation: wash with warm soapy water and rinse thoroughly with hot water; after rinsing, blast away as much moisture as possible with compressed air, then soak it down with WD-40 (or similar product); let that sit for an hour or two, then use compressed air to blow away as much of it as you can and apply WD-40 again, or another light-weight oil to protect it.
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