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  • Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,280 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Scott,

    It does look very much like a John "Ulrich" engraved gun versus Herman or Conrad Ulrich, but I would first want to remove the buttstock and inspect it. The person listing it is somewhat ignorant as well... he doesn't know much about the "Ulrich" brothers, or how to grade that rifle. In addition to the replaced stocks, the barrel has been moderately buffed & polished and reblued. It definitely is not worth what he is asking for it.
  • gearheaddadgearheaddad Member Posts: 15,125 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi Bert,
    If you don't mind me asking, what would you hope to find/not find by removing the butt stock? I have an 1866 that could just about be this ones sister that my father left me.
    Thanks,
    Ed
  • Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,280 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by gearheaddad
    Hi Bert,
    If you don't mind me asking, what would you hope to find/not find by removing the butt stock? I have an 1866 that could just about be this ones sister that my father left me.
    Thanks,
    Ed


    Hello Ed,

    I do not mind at all... that is what this forum in designed for afterall[^]

    On most factory engraved Winchesters of that era (but not all mind you), the engraver cut his initials somewhere into the frame or the tang in an area hidden by the buttstock. Additionally, on all but the very late production Model 1866s, the screws and buttstock are serial numbered to the gun (the screws will have the last three digits of the serial number on them). If a gun has been stripped down prior to being refinished, it is relatively easy to detect by removing the stocks and inspecting the hidden surfaces.
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