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1917 eddystone 30 cal? bolt action

jaysocojaysoco Member Posts: 2 ✭✭
edited June 2006 in Ask the Experts
I was wondering if anyone has an idea of the value of an eddystone still packed in cosmoline. unknown if it has been refurbished. I don't know if I spelled cosmoline correct. You know what I mean. This is a rifle that was sent to a vfw post and never uncrated in 1948. With original packing list from 1948. Are the rifles worth more in a full crate or separately all seem to be in same condition not consecutive serial numbers. all still packed.

Comments

  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,796 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Value would depend upon the condition & originality of the individual rifles. Being in a complete crate wouldn't increase the value, unless we are talking about brand new rifles.

    There is also a good chance that these are welded, unserviceable drill rifles, in which case they would be worth very little.

    However, few VFW posts actually own their rifles; most are on loan from the US government. So, they are probably still charged out to the post, & they may have been reported as "stolen"; in that case, they are subject to seizure.

    Neal
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    If they are servicable rifles and not drill rifles (I am inclined to believe they are probably servicable given the transfer date), on the open market they would fetch between $300 and $700 currently.
    The army doesn't use the Model of 1917 anymore, so I doubt they really give a damn about them. They got through Korea and Vietnam without them okay.[:D]
  • SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,754 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If all origional they should bring fairly good money. There is more interest in the 1917s lately. The Eddystone are the least desirable of the three makes with Winchester followed by Remington and then Eddystone. The receivers are known to be somewhat brittle due to heat treating but in origional condition they should still to fairly well. I am thinking a minimum or $500.00 if you advertise them with the origional transfer paperwork. Start with one and see what it brings, it might supprise you.
  • heavyironheavyiron Member Posts: 1,421 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi,

    Many of the Model 1917's were also reworked at arsenals across the country shortly after WWII started. Many of the reworked Model 1917's were sent to England.

    DCP_0180.jpg

    If the barrel is stamped JA like above, it is a Johnson Arms barrel and it means the rifle has been reworked. (yes, the same Johnson as the Johnson rifle of WWII fame) If you get a chance examine all the parts of the rifle to determine if the parts match. If some of the smaller parts are marked "W" or "R" instead of "E", the rifle will have been reworked somewhere along the line. Also check the reciever ring where the barrel joins with the reciever. Some of these rifles have cracks at this location and if they do they should not be fired.

    Hope this helped.

    Regards,

    Heavyiron
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by heavyiron
    Also check the reciever ring where the barrel joins with the reciever. Some of these rifles have cracks at this location and if they do they should not be fired.




    HI,
    I have read this also. The story goes that the barrels were put on too tight to begin with and the removal during rework caused cracks in some receivers, the majority being Eddystone.
    It was recommended to magnaflux or spray oil on the receiver ring, wipe, and watch for the telltale seep of the oil from the cracks.
  • drsckdrsck Member Posts: 992
    edited November -1
    The comment about the government still possibly owning the rifles is correct. But, there was a program a few years back that allowed the various organizations to which the riles had been lent to purchase them. Don't know if it's still available or not, but I seem to recall a post or two on GB about it. Might show up in a search.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,750 ******
    edited November -1
    I'D CHECK THE POST RECORDS TO SEE IF THESE ARE ACTUALY OWNED BY THE POST. THE CMP IS SELLING M-1917'S THAT WERE RETURNED 'ON LOAN' RIFLES SO THE ARMY WILL STILL HAVE AN INTREST IN THEM IF THEY THEY ARE NOT OWNED BY THE POST.
  • Emmett DunhamEmmett Dunham Member Posts: 1,418 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Eddyfields were not know for brittle receivers, they are known for cracking the threads on the receiver when the barrel is removed, that could lead to cracks in the receiver. The cracking is caused by the very high torque specifications used to assemble the barrel to the receiver when manufactured. This cracking is not a material defect it is the tools and the person doing the gun smithing.


    Emmett
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