In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

Interarms Rifles

bakmc3bakmc3 Member Posts: 159 ✭✭✭
edited October 2008 in Ask the Experts
Are the Interarm rifles still manufactured in England??
If they are not made there any longer do any of you know when the English made Interarm rifles were no longer produced there??

Over all how would you rate these rifles in accuracy and durability??

mike

Comments

  • Options
    bakmc3bakmc3 Member Posts: 159 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Can anybody tell me who makes Interarms rifles,And where,Are they any good,Are they or will they compare to remington's,winchester's,etc.Just asking what is your thought.

    thank's[:D]
  • Options
    BigLoop22BigLoop22 Member Posts: 620 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    bakmc3,

    If you are talking about Interarms of Alexandria, Virginia, then you are talking about a defunct company. They went out of business a bunch of years ago- I'd say the late 1990s-to-the early 2000s timeframe. They used to be called "InterArmCo", I think, and a lawsuit made them change that name (in the 1960s, I think).

    Is there a speciific rifle that you want information on?

    I recall reading a blurb about a new company that is using the name "Interarms". I know nothing about it.

    NOTE:

    Let us not forget all of the Rossi Puma leverguns (also called Rossi Model 65 and Rossi Model 92) that came through Interarms.
  • Options
    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Interarms has been out of business since the late 90's. They were a American importer/distributor of foreign firearms. The bolt action rifles that I'm familiar with that were sold under the Interarms name were known as Whitworth, Mark 10 & Howa. Those were just the centerfires, they also sold rimfires made by different manufacturers.
  • Options
    PA ShootistPA Shootist Member Posts: 691 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have owned an Interarms Mk X with Mannlicher-style full stock in 7x57 Mauser for quite a while. It is a commercial version of a Mauser 98, marked Whitworth, England. It is a well-made action, has a good trigger and right-side mounted safety for use with scope sights, was drilled and tapped for scope mounts, and with a good barrel that shoots very well. I scoped it with Leupold mounts made for a FN 98 commercial Mauser, and these fit perfectly. I can definitely recommend that particular model as equal to any of my Remington or Winchester bolt-actions I have owned over the years, and still own. They did import many other models.
  • Options
    B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,221 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had a Mark X Viscount model in .243. For a light sporter it was a real tack driver. The stock was warped and it was ok for coyotes in the winter but shot poorly in the summer at groundhogs as the humidity was up. The metal parts were top shelf as was the feed and function. I traded it off to a freind that knew the history and he restocked it and still has it to this day. That was 34 years ago.
  • Options
    givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    All of the above. I can vouch for rifles with the word "Interarms" stamped into the left side of the receiver (bolt rifle). It left the factory as a high-quality firearm, indeed. Mine is a Mark X chambered for .375 H&H magnum. Best, Joe
  • Options
    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    bakmc3,

    "...who makes Interarms rifles"

    As has been pointed out, Interarms was an importer/distributor of firearms and as such had several lines of 'rifles'. The rifles I paid the most attention to were the bolt actions which have been labeled differently depending on who was the distributor at the time. When Interarms imported them they were labeled Mark X.

    These rifles were manufactured in Yugoslavia at a factory named Zastava. Since the demise of Interarms, Charles Daly took over the distribution for several years until recently when Remington outbid them on the distribution. These rifles are currently listed as the M798 and M799 on their website.

    "Are they any good..."

    They are the Improved version of the original German M98 Mauser. I think they make a fine hunting rifle although not as good a value as they would have been had Remington stayed out of the bidding.

    "Are they or will they compare to remington's,winchester's,etc."

    The design of the Mark X (M798) is that of the M98 Mauser so it can be said to compare to the Winchester M70 Pre-'64, Classic and their newest revision due out any time by virtue of the claw extractor and controlled round feed. I don't think that Zastava puts as much effort into the manufacture of the Mark X as Winchester has in the M70 in the past or currently but I haven't seen any decided difference in accuracy or handling either. Comparing them to the Remington is sort of difficult since the M700 is a simple tube with a bolt in the middle. The design differences and related arguments about advantages and disadvantages have been covered on numerous occasions on every forum on the internet and can be found with a search.

    The original design was dedicated to the safety of the shooter and the efficiency of use for the need of both a military and commercial rifle. I don't think you can go wrong with any of the variations.

    Best.
  • Options
    MichibayMichibay Member Posts: 816 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The mauser actions from Zastava in Yugoslavia are built on German machinery licensed by Germany. Many fine custom guns have been built using these actions. They are very strong and can be chambered for any cartridge available. They are excellent Model 98 mauser actions.

    Herter's in the 1960's imported these and they were called the J-9. After Herter's, Interarms imported them calling them the Mark X. After Interarms, it was Charles Daly...now Remington.

    By the way, at one time Interarms manufactured their own brand of single action handguns HERE in the states...they were very well made, and they were called the Virginian Dragoon.
  • Options
    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Michibay,

    "The mauser actions from Zastava in Yugoslavia are built on German machinery licensed by Germany."

    This hasn't been true since the '40s during WWII. Zastava was liberated in October of 1944 and 98.5% of the machinery was destroyed. From 1944 until 1950, the gunworks were devoted to repair and restoration of armaments and vehicles.

    From 1950 to 1954 Zastava was committed to a separation from the military arsenal concept to embracing commercial firearms manufacturing. From 1954 to 1962 new facilities were built and new machinery brought in, a significant portion being the forging machines used to create the basis for the commercial firearms. The design used was put forward by FN Belgium with their Improved Mauser design.

    Best.
  • Options
    MichibayMichibay Member Posts: 816 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks...I stand corrected with a great history lesson! Guns & Ammo published a special booklet in 1983 entitled "Big Bore Rifles". There were many good references about the Mark X rifles and actions. My grandfather came from Loznica Serbia...so I have an affinity for these very good mauser actions and rifles. I have seen some very nice "customs" built with these Yugoslav actions...Thanks so much!!!
  • Options
    jptatumjptatum Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Interarms actions have been the basis for many custom and semi custom rifles througth the years. I believe all, or almost all, of the rifles built by P. O. Ackley were built using Interarms or Winchester 70 actions. The Ackley rifle I have is a 30-06 built on an interarms action. It is definitely not a custom rifle but it is a really good shooter.
Sign In or Register to comment.