In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

What do you use...

Hunter MagHunter Mag Member Posts: 6,610 ✭✭✭
edited October 2008 in Ask the Experts
To clean the barrel after firing corrosive ammo?

I usually spray carb cleaner down the barrel then brush it good then swab it with hoppes.

Good enough? Anything better/faster?

Comments

  • Options
    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    WINDEX then Hoppies#9.
  • Options
    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Windex at the range, then take it home and swab it out with either Remoil or Brake Free.
  • Options
    jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    My standard answer on the subject:

    Water, water, water! NOT ammonia or Windex!

    Corrosive primers contain a salt compound. Specifically potassium chloride. Or potassium chlorate, I forget which. But anyhow, a salt.

    Ever leave a shaker of salt on the kitchen table in a humid environment? It gets clogged and water condenses on the top. This is why rice in the salt shaker keeps it flowing; the rice absorbs the water.

    Same thing happens in your rifle bore eventually causing pitting and rusting if left uncleaned.

    Salt is a very neutral compound. Very stable and non-reactive, though it does retain water fairly well (hygroscopic). That being the case, it CANNOT be NEUTRALIZED (as if it were and acid or base) it can ONLY be dissolved and therefore washed away. So HOT WATER with a little soap perhaps is BEST. Windex and ammonia only work as they have WATER in them. Period! Pour a pint or two down the bore, wipe off the bolt face, and dry. Clean as normal, then oil and you are done. Period.

    What DOES Windex or Ammonia do? Well they are useful for removing copper fouling so if you want to use them go for it, but otherwise, it is hardly necessary to play with foul smelling compounds that can mess up wood and perhaps metal finishes when water works fine.

    Now to your specifics. Carb cleaner will remove the carbon fouling and probably in the process rinse some of the salts away. I have no idea if it will dissolve salt and frankly don't much care.

    The real reason your method works is the hoppes. Hoppes contains something like 10% water. Plenty of hoppes will do the trick, but as I don't use hoppes (I mix my own bore cleaner, Ed's Red, which contains no water) I don't go by that. Even if I did the amount of water that we're talking about on a few patches wouldn't reassure me that the job was done.

    USGI bore cleaner of Korean war or earlier vintage will also work; it is essentially a mix of water soluble oil and water and some other stuff. Black powder solvent will also do fine.

    But why bother? Boiling hot water does the job best. It flash dries and as a side benefit warms up your barrel to make the rest of the cleaning job with standard bore cleaner easier.
  • Options
    Wehrmacht_45Wehrmacht_45 Member Posts: 3,377
    edited November -1
    Hot soapy water followed by a good oil will take out the salt.

    I use foaming bore cleaner to get out the rest.

    Windex does work because it has water in it, and the ammonia helps clean a little more if you are not using a bore cleaner.
  • Options
    Hunter MagHunter Mag Member Posts: 6,610 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Jonk I used to use hot tap water but got lazy and use carb/brake cleaner. You are correct that water dissolves salt. But it's somewhat difficult(for me)to hold the rifle,the funnel then pour the wter in the funnel. I have a small funnel that fits rather well into the bore but I still have to hold it. Yes I know I shouldn't be so lazy. LOL
    the carb/brake clean really cleans everything out of the bore and it dries fast.
    However I do think water may be the best but somewhat more labor intensive. LOL
  • Options
    jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    Then I'd second the BP cleaner or USGI surplus again. :)

    Another option is to hold the gun and use your rod to pump water back and forth, with the muzzle in a bucket. You only need 2 hands, not the 3 for the gun, funnel, and pot. [:D]
  • Options
    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Clean it just like a muzzle loader with black powder...hot soapy water, and a cleaning rod with jag and patch to pump the water in from the pan of water woth the muzzle submerged. Water should be almost boiling hot. After scrubbing the barrel, dry with a patch or two, and then oil. If this rifle is a gas operated semi automatic...you have to clean out the gas system now too.

    Best
  • Options
    allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 35,369 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Another option is to hold the gun and use your rod to pump water back and forth, with the muzzle in a bucket. You only need 2 hands, not the 3 for the gun, funnel, and pot.

    That's how the Marines cleaned their rifles in WW2.
    Good enough for the Marines, good enough for me.
    Quick and easy.
    Plus, you flush all kinds of black gunk out of the bore.
Sign In or Register to comment.