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scale question

toad67toad67 Member Posts: 13,019 ✭✭✭✭
edited February 2015 in Ask the Experts
The little metal grain tenths sign on my 10-10 scale fell off. I tried to glue it on and didn't work. If I used JB weld would the amount of goop change my scale accuracy?

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    MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    Yes. You cannot change the weight of either balance.
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    rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    As this is a balance scale, I would say yes. You notice how light the weight on the 1/10's beam is.

    You may be able to balance the scale out by putting some weight on the bottom of your balance pan, but it would be trial and error to get it within the range of adjustment you have to zero the scale.

    Another option is to lightly etch the beam itself to signify where the marks used to be and maybe sharpie the value.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think it is possible to glue it on and recalibrate/adjust the scale.
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    toad67toad67 Member Posts: 13,019 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, it's a balance beam scale. It seemed like it would throw it off if I did use some JB on it, however I was thinking that just re adjusting the level wheel and re centering it on the line would still make it work correctly.
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    firstharmonicfirstharmonic Member Posts: 1,061 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think that you're out of luck. If you add weight to that beam and could re-zero it using the adjusting screw on the left you'd only be accurate at zero as you will have changed the overall weight and weight distribution of the balance beam. Not a chance that I would ever consider when using something to weigh powder charges.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Balance beam scales, are as outdated as buggy whips. I've bought and use 2 digital scales, in the last 4 years. Once they came down in price to under $30, I jumped on them. Much easier and faster to use than balance beam. My RCBS 10-10 is just taking up space. Haven't used it in years. Fixing to put it on the auction.
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    p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    Balance beam scales, are as outdated as buggy whips. I've bought and use 2 digital scales, in the last 4 years. Once they came down in price to under $30, I jumped on them. Much easier and faster to use than balance beam. My RCBS 10-10 is just taking up space. Haven't used it in years. Fixing to put it on the auction.


    The only power requirement on my loading table is a tumbler and in a power outage (for whatever reason) I could get by without it.
    Not so with a scale.
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    v35v35 Member Posts: 12,710 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Along with a balance beam scale you should have a set of weights to calibrate it.
    You could clean both surfaces with a strong solvent removing old adhesive followed by applying a thin liquid rubber or urethane adhesive. Squeeze out all excess from the joint and remove with a rubber eraser.
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    Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    Outdated as Buggy whips??? Such blasphemy.

    If the electronic scale has a measurer so that you set it for a specific charge and it can deliver it in less than five seconds, then it MIGHT be quicker than me using a balance beam with the appropriate Lee Dipper and trickler spoon. And, I don't have to go through the trust gaining procedure with the electronic scale- before I'd trust it enough to actually shoot something that it measured the powder charge.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by p3skyking

    The only power requirement on my loading table is a tumbler and in a power outage (for whatever reason) I could get by without it.
    Not so with a scale.



    Time to wake up, and smell the flowers, Rip Van Winkle. Digital scales use batteries, and always have. No powder cords required.
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    pgspearspgspears Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    If there is one tool I want to be right on my bench, it is the scale. To be doubly sure, I use a digital scale to verify a weight, then I use the balance beam scale to double check it. Using the test weights to verify my balance beam readings, and recalibrating my digital scale regularly gives me some peace of mind but, even so, it is best to recheck both scales anytime they are left unused for a lengthy period, or when making a long reloading run.
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