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1917 Eddystone

Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
edited February 2015 in Ask the Experts
I'm looking for some information on value.I have a 1917 Eddystone that was lend leased to Canada but not sure if it was WW1 or WW2.It has the red paint around the forearm the stamp "C" with an arrow through it and also the letters PWOR on the stock which stands for"Princes of Wales own Regiment". They were loaned to Canada to protect against invasion. Since it never saw action it is in remarkably good condition.Some of you are going to tell me to include pictures but I have not mastered that ability yet.Metal is pristine wood is excellent no cracks or large dings.Based on my description can you give me a ballpark value? I don't want to sell it because of it;s unusual history but I would like to know it's value Thanks

Comments

  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I recently purchased a 1917 U.S. Enfield, eddystone, in excellent condition. I am aware that there have been problems with the reciever cracking on these, due to brittleness. Is there a way to check these for safety, or they all to dangerous to shoot and only good for wall hangers? Any advice welcome. Thanks, Dan
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Can you help me figure out the value of this Gun. U.S MODEL OF 1917 EDDYSTONE 1257885. IT has small e's on the smaller parts. one of those flaming 0'S and a small P on the underside of the stock.I am posting this message for my hubby whom is out of town so please exuse my great lack of knowledge regarding this gun. I could not begin to describe the condition because I do not understand the proper terms used when describing condition,but I could e mail some pictures that would much better show off it's condition.We are thinking of placing it on one of the auction sites and would like to get a ballpark of it's value. Thanks so much,Janet

    RITCHIE GRIFFIN
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am now the happy owner of a US Model 1917 Eddystone manufactured in Nov 1918 (not purchased through the CMP). From the information I have been able to garner, it appears the sling for this weapon could be a 1907, 1917 web, or 1923 web. I also see mention of a Kerr sling? What in all likelhood would have been the correct issue sling, or put another way, what sling would be acceptable for CMP as issued competition matches?
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Does anyone know if new barrels are available and about how much for the model 1917 Eddystone.I recently aquired a complete, correct Eddystone in great condition but was apparently used with blanks (American legion?) and never properly cleaned, bore is in very sad condition, bullets keyhole in the target at only 25 yards.It's in such good condition I hate to make a wall hanger out of it. Thanks Dave
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    awhile back I bought a 1917 for my young son to deer hunt with,it has been sporterized,looks better than most new rifles and shoots like a dream,I can do 1/2" groups at 100 yrds all day.My question is ,how hard is it to convert it to cocking on opening instead of closing,I have seen a few on the auction side that have been done so I know its possible,the last inch on closing the bolt on this rifle "when it cocks" is hard for me and real hard on my son.anyone know a good smith I might could send the bolt to and have this done without it costing an arm and a leg?
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was given 2 eddystone rifles 95% condition are they worth anything ?are they 30-06cal.?Thanks for any info.
    [email protected],com
  • deerhidedeerhide Member Posts: 224 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Dave,
    It's a good rifle, the action is like a Remington. The .303 British ammo is powerful enough for N.A. game.
    They mostly sell for around $200 'sporterized' and maybe as much as $400 in full military.
  • 1BigGuy1BigGuy Member Posts: 4,032 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    According to the "Standard Catalog of Military Firearms 7th Edition, a Model 1917 in Excellent condition = 750, Very Good condition = 600, Good = 450, Fair = 250. (Add 30% for Winchester model)

    From the accompanying text:
    quote:In 1917, when the United States entered WWI, there was a s distinct rifle shortage. There were production facilities set up for the British Pattern 1914 rifle. The "Enfield" rifle was redesigned to accept the .30-06 cartridge and was pressed into service as the U.S. Rifle Model 1917. This rifle appears similar to the British Pattern 1914 rifle. In fact, they are so similar that in WWII, when over a million were sold to Britain for use by their Home Guard, it was necessary to paint a 2" stripe around the butt so that the caliber was immediately known. The barrel length is 26", and it has a 6-round integral box magazine. The finish is matte-blue, with a walnut stock. Towards the end of production parkerized parts were added. The breech is marked "U.S. Model 1917." This was a robust and heavy-duty rifle, and many are used in the manufacture of large-bore custom rifles to this day. There were approximately 2,200,000 manufactured by Remington, Winchester, and Eddystone between 1917 and 1918. The majority were produced at Eddystone, Pennsylvania.
    During WWII all parts were parkerized, and barrels were supplied by the Johnson Automatics Company as a result of the rebuild.

    For more reading, check these links:
    http://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/detail.asp?smallarms_id=131
    http://www.odcmp.org/503/rifle.pdf
    http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_enfield_p14_m1917.html

    Edit: I know that my Eddystone is very accurate, although it shoots to the left a couple inches. Because your has obvious Canadian markings, it might be worth significantly more than the prices suggested above.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,272 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Likely if it's a 1917 Eddystone. It's a 30-06, and used in Canada during W W II, not W W I. The red paint denotes 30-06 cartridge. As the Canadians were still using the .303 SMLE Enfield, as there service rifle.

    If it is arsenal original? My WAG is that it would be up in 4 figures, because of the Canadian history and markings. To a military rifle collector.
  • Manoa-FishermanManoa-Fisherman Member Posts: 190 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I got lucky and got a similar Canadian service 1917 in Winchester. The red paint was removed by accident when I was taking off the cosmoline off the rifle. That knocked of a couple of hundred to a collector. Otherwise, the rifles is in excellent shape and is in its original bluing rather than parkerized.

    I was worried that it was a "parts" gun, but found that everything seems to be marked with a "W" stamp throughout. As mentioned, the rifle saw little use and the rifling is very strong, though the barrel seems rather dark.

    A good range for an Eddystone in very good condition should be around $600 to $800, more if it is in really great shape. You didn't mention if it was in its original blue or if it was parkerized. If I is blued, you might be able to break $1,000 like Rufe-snow said.
  • ChrisStreettChrisStreett Member Posts: 3,714 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 on the significance of the red band Rufe, ya beat me to it.
    "...dying ain't much of a living boy"-Josey Wales
  • Dave45-70Dave45-70 Member Posts: 637 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Mine is parked not blue, it came from the estate of a very serious collector so I was happy to get it.I googled PWOR and what a history they have begining in 1863. I plan to leave this rifle to kids or grandkids since you seldom see one or one this nice. thanks to all you guys who provided me with info.PS this belongs in the safe instead of the gun rack Dave
  • Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 21,627 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    They are great shooters, IMO.

    I have a few of them, 3 Remington and one Winchester and take them all out to play at least once a year. I know it is sacrilege, but I actually like the way they shoot and handle better than the 1903s.

    Their price seems to have increased a bit over the past few years. I purchase all of mine within the past 10 and with the exception of the Winchester, did not pay much over $ 500.0 for any of them.

    DSCN0051_zpsf6cb7a50.jpg
    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,272 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Don McManus
    They are great shooters, IMO.

    I have a few of them, 3 Remington and one Winchester and take them all out to play at least once a year. I know it is sacrilege, but I actually like the way they shoot and handle better than the 1903s.

    Their price seems to have increased a bit over the past few years. I purchase all of mine within the past 10 and with the exception of the Winchester, did not pay much over $ 500.0 for any of them.

    DSCN0051_zpsf6cb7a50.jpg




    Not many factory original ones,to be had anymore. Although they were made in great quantity. It's been almost 100 years now.

    Don't mean to ruffle any feathers. But the reason so many were sporterized. Besides being dirt cheap, in the 50's and 60's. Is that they were big heavy clunkers. That had the ergonomics of a 4 X 4. They must have been designed for the British Palace guardsman. Who were 6'2", with arms to match. The only way I could ever shoot one, and hit anything. Was off a rest.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The ones I played with shot OK, stronger action than a Springfield. Seemed a lot heavier to pack around though.
  • ChrisStreettChrisStreett Member Posts: 3,714 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Years ago I got lucky while digging thru (literally) a pile of Eddystones at a gunshow...managed to find an all original Winchester, nice bore, blued, barrel date 9/18, remnants of the painted red band, etc, for $100. Hard to believe I agonized over spending that much at the time but I suppose it's gained a little value since then.
    "...dying ain't much of a living boy"-Josey Wales
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