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model 94 Winchester

gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
edited February 2015 in Ask the Experts
Would it be pretty common to find a 94 receiver with a 64 barrel? The receiver is not drilled for a receiver sight and I think I read that all 64's were drilled for the receiver sight.

Comments

  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have an octagon barrel 30-30 serial #125549 that I inherited.It has 30WCF on top of the barrel behind the sight.It says nickel steel barrel especially for smokeless powder. The barrel is 23" long. I'd say it is in very good condition considering its age.Can you tell me any thing about value and if it can be traced to the original buyer.
    Thanks,
    Gerald
  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    have three pre 64 model 94's one from 1919 one from 1936 other 1 1940 (stickys info.)
    been informed that they should have metal buttplates, which they don't, they are composite of some sort with Winchester logos.any info. on where I can obtain metal buttplates for these guns, as I can't locate any. Thanks Gunpirate
  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sorry about the bad posts. The serial # on my 30/30 is 1279510.
  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Bert said my 94 was pre WW2 and most likely manufactured b'tween '38 and '41, i read his refrence to a WP in an oval thet signifies that the gun has been proofed. My "94" also has 2 more "ovals" at the base of the bbl. What might these signify?

    The "BIG MONEY FISH" are down deep.
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    They do not absolutely have to have metal buttplates. Metal was standard, but the optional "shotgun butt" was a black hard rubber type material with the Winchester name and logo in the center. Most of these have a point on the top center of the buttplate, inletted into the stock.

    Please post pics, we can tell you if the buttplates are original or not.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682
    edited November -1
    Not all Pre-64' Model 94's with shot gun style butts, had hard black rubber plates. I have a 1938 Model 94, in 32 Winchester Special, that has a checkered steel plate. It has the long forend, too.

    Best

    EDIT 1

    Bert,

    You are correct, it is most likely not factory. It does have two additional holes in the receiver for a Weaver side mount for a scope too. The butt plate fits correctly, and the stock fits it "proudly".

    This has way more sentimental value than, any collector value would be if it were still NIB. I used to hunt with him when I was 9 years old. He passed in 1977, when I was almost 12. I acquired his two rifles, and his two shotguns. The other rifle is a Remington pump action 22, model 572, and the shotguns are both Winnie's...a model 1887 lever action, and a model 1897hammer pump gun. I have slayed turkey's with both of the shotguns. An old friend who had a gunshop, showed me how to make the loads for the 1887, cutting them to the correct length(I now have all brass casings for it), and correctly sealing them with the cardboard over wad, and waterglass.

    As you know, my other grandfather left me that 1892, in 38 W.C.F. It is not original either, with the cut off octagon barrel, and magazine tube. From research forwarded to me by an old friend(who likes maple syrup products), it started lice as a 44-40, sporting rifle. The conversion work on that was nicely done, and I am guessing that happened sometime during the Great Depression, or just before. It was made in 1898.

    Them fella's back then were not collectors, but utilitarian's.

    Best
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    Not all Pre-64' Model 94's with shot gun style butts, had hard black rubber plates. I have a 1938 Model 94, in 32 Winchester Special, that has a checkered steel plate. It has the long forend, too.

    Best


    I also have a 1938 model 94, 'long wood', with a shotgun butt that is grooved steel, as opposed to checkered.
  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MG1890
    They do not absolutely have to have metal buttplates. Metal was standard, but the optional "shotgun butt" was a black hard rubber type material with the Winchester name and logo in the center. Most of these have a point on the top center of the buttplate, inletted into the stock.

    Please post pics, we can tell you if the buttplates are original or not.
  • gunpirategunpirate Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    thanks for info.I won't bother with metal plates, guns are fine with composite guess I had bad info. from gunshowquote:Originally posted by MG1890
    They do not absolutely have to have metal buttplates. Metal was standard, but the optional "shotgun butt" was a black hard rubber type material with the Winchester name and logo in the center. Most of these have a point on the top center of the buttplate, inletted into the stock.

    Please post pics, we can tell you if the buttplates are original or not.
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    Also possible stocks have been replaced....
  • Bert H.Bert H. Member, Moderator Posts: 11,274 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    Not all Pre-64' Model 94's with shot gun style butts, had hard black rubber plates. I have a 1938 Model 94, in 32 Winchester Special, that has a checkered steel plate. It has the long forend, too.

    Best


    Tim,

    If your 1938 manufactured Model 94 has a checkered steel butt plate, it is not factory original. Winchester first introduced the flat checkered steel butt plate in late 1945 - early 1946.
  • Bert H.Bert H. Member, Moderator Posts: 11,274 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MG1890
    They do not absolutely have to have metal buttplates. Metal was standard, but the optional "shotgun butt" was a black hard rubber type material with the Winchester name and logo in the center. Most of these have a point on the top center of the buttplate, inletted into the stock.

    Please post pics, we can tell you if the buttplates are original or not.


    Correct, except the widows peak was eliminated in the early 1920s. If a hard rubber butt plate was special ordered, the butt stock should also have a fluted comb.

    A 1936 vintage Model 94 should have a traditional carbine style butt plate, as most of them in that year were "transitional" Model 94s. A 1940 vintage Model 94 was standard with the serrated steel butt plate.
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