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Restore or simply preserve (Winchester model 12)

gtech02gtech02 Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
edited March 2015 in Ask the Experts
I purchased an old model 12 intending to take it skeet shooting. I've had a gunsmith check it out and the gun is mechanically sound. Cosmetically its rough, some light surface rust and almost no bluing left. I am considering having the rust cleaned up and applying a cerakote coating. I'm assuming that a mid-1920s field grade model 12 in poor cosmetic condition has no real collector value. Am I correct that assumption?

My plan for the shotgun was target shooting/bird hunting when I bought it. However, I know nothing about shotgun collecting so I thought I'd ask before I modified the gun.

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    CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    Your correct, there is no collector value in a rough field grade model 12. Fix it up the way you want it, you'll have a great handling and shooting shotgun.
    W.D.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had a Model 12, for a while. Excellent quality gun, Very heavy though. Not something I would want to carry, for long distances in the field. Or to use as a fast pointer, as required for skeet. You definitely have to eat your Wheaties, if your going to haul a Model 12 around.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would consider having it re-blued in hot salts.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    As mentioned, in the condition it is, it retains, virtually no collector value. They are one of the slickest slide action, shotguns ever made. Dress it the way you wish, and use it.

    Best
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    Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Like Charlie, I would treat it to a conventional reblue.
    A painted Roaring Twenties gun just doesn't seem right.

    If you are going to shoot regulation Skeet with a pump, you are going to have to develop some serious shucking skills.
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    317wc317wc Member Posts: 924 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had about the same situation you are in. I had a 30s vintage M12 I bought at auction that was mechanically very good, but the finish was almost totally gone. Stock toe was cracked, and so was the slide. I had it hot-blued, and since I am a woodworker, I patterned a new stock set from the old one. The result was a gun that looks great, I have little monetary value in, and its great for hunting. At the time, I didn't have the money to have in threaded for interchangeable chokes. It still has the original 28" barrel.

    I second the hot-blue suggestion.
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    toad67toad67 Member Posts: 13,019 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Be prepared for the stock to crack in the wrist. IMO them old ones have a 50/50 chance of doing that, and past history has taught me that.
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    eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    i,m on the other side,leave it alone.reblueing will not make it shoot any better,it you want choke tubes take the reblue money and have it done. mike orlen will thread it for true line choke tubes for 75.00 including return postage.i have a 1927 model 12 trap gun that does not have much finish left and it looks like it should a well used and taken care of shotgun. the splitting of the wrist area can be caused by not tightening the butt stock bolt, the wood can shrink over the years causing the stock to loosen up a little and when its fired can cause the stock to split. eastbank.
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    asphalt cowboyasphalt cowboy Member Posts: 8,904 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Should you decide to have it hot blued Glenrock Blue does first rate work at a fair price.
    http://gunbluing.com/
    I noticed while viewing their site, they also do cerakote.
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    machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    I would go with a good hot-blue, although I also like vintage guns that are 'white'. A kind of attractive character all of their own, although they are more prone to oxidation and require a bit more maintenance.
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