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32-20 thick base

peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
edited March 2015 in Ask the Experts
I was shooting some 32-20's with a old SW and cylinder locked up (would not turn). Trouble was that one of the factory Remington shells had a very thick case base (bottom of shell with primer). Primer was not the cause but the base was .010" too thick. Rest of shells in same box were fine. These were Remington factor shells. Very odd to have this happen, anyone else ever have this trouble with factory shells?

Comments

  • fordsixfordsix Member Posts: 8,722
    edited November -1
    ya know shnizzle happens
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,534 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Remington rimfire ammo has a evil reputation. Some folks won't use it at all. Not so much centerfire.
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,375 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I wonder? I believe that there was a high powered .32-20 cartridge made for rifles, & there were warnings not to fire them in revolvers. Is it possible that the thick rim is our warning that the cartridges you attempted to use were really the rifle version?

    Spanishrevolverleft.jpg

    Neal
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The 32-20 High Velocity rifle rounds had jacketed bullets and marked HV on the head stamp. They will indeed fit and fire in a S&W, and you should not do it.

    A single case made it from the set up the tooling phase to loaded ammo, it happens. Off center flash holes and other flaws hardly ever got out back when there was such a thing as quality control and people that cared about their work.

    I still have some Remington golden bullets 22 I bought in the late 60's for a penny each. They still function better than most new bulk packed crap sold today.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by charliemeyer007
    The 32-20 High Velocity rifle rounds had jacketed bullets and marked HV on the head stamp. They will indeed fit and fire in a S&W, and you should not do it.

    A single case made it from the set up the tooling phase to loaded ammo, it happens. Off center flash holes and other flaws hardly ever got out back when there was such a thing as quality control and people that cared about their work.

    I still have some Remington golden bullets 22 I bought in the late 60's for a penny each. They still function better than most new bulk packed crap sold today.


    +1...what Charlie says!

    EDIT 1

    quote:these were revolver rounds, thanks for the input.

    It does not matter if they were revolver rounds, or HS rifle rounds. The dimensions for the case are the same. It is just that the HS rifle rounds were loaded to slightly higher pressures for use in the 1892 Winter rifles. As Charlie, has said, we are all humans, setting up machines for production, in this case. Occasionally, one squeaks by on the line, when making adjustments in the set up. I am sure there have been procedures developed to try to prevent this, by all manufacturers, but alas, we are all, only, still human.

    Best
  • peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    these were revolver rounds, thanks for the input.
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