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Best 1911 configuration

7.62x39Lover7.62x39Lover Member Posts: 3,939 ✭✭✭
edited April 2015 in Ask the Experts
Hi guys,

What is the best "type" 1911 ever produced and why?

I am feeling nostalgic about a bygone era and want to buy a 1911.

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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Aside from custom guns a Colt series 70 Government model and the best of those a Gold Cup because of adjustable sights and wide trigger & enlarged ejection port EDIT Yes the series Gold Cup is not ALL that It Could be [:(] But to make it a TRUE master class target pistol would raise the cost to be MUCH higher than most people would be willing to spend. when I speak of Master Class pistol this would be a pistol shooting 2 inch groups + or - 1/2 " at 50 yards from a machine rest. I would venture to say less than 5% of all pistol shooters would Want because of added cost or NEED because of their skill level a pistol capable of this accuracy. Again custom guns are available but at High cost. the Colt Series 70 used some of the best steel and workmanship on a PRODUCTION 1911 Pistol at prices within reason.
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    7.62x39Lover7.62x39Lover Member Posts: 3,939 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That's what I wanted clarification on. What is series 70, series 80 and so on and so forth?
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Best" is subjective. . .(IE "best" in what way?).

    I'd agree, though, that if you want a "stock" 1911, you're definitely not going to go wrong with a Colt series 70, either in terms of quality/performance, or investment value. Gold Cup is the "best" of the series 70, so thats a reasonable (though, obviously subjective and debatable) answer.

    Colt series 70 refers specifically to a line of guns Colt introduced in 1970. Getting to the bottom line, these guns were built in the USA using all American made parts, forged where appropriate (eg frame, slide, etc). The main thing this series is known for is the lack of a firing pin safety. That gives the guns the "best" trigger pull, though in theory a loaded gun dropped hard enough on its muzzle could discharge accidentally.

    Series 80 refers to the guns after Colt put in the firing pin block safety. That prevents the muzzle drop firing, but also slightly degrades the quality of the trigger pull, because its the action of the trigger that lifts the firing pin block.

    Edit: See here on model 70.

    http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/history/s70_colts.htm

    Apparently Colt is currently putting these out, but IMO, you really want one from the 1970s!

    Edit #2, responding to below
    Quote:
    quote:I think the Gold Cups still needed work to be all they could be.Begging the question of what exactly you mean by "all they could be", I think the only way you're going to max performance of any 1911 is by having it custom tuned to your specs. That involves determining what those specs are, potentially accurizing the gun by peening the slide rails, etc.

    Gold cup is a mass production gun, so comparing it to something that's been hand-tuned to individual specs isn't really "fair". Gold cup was specifically designed to be a range/competition gun. It was so the average schmoe could buy a gun, take it right out of the box and then compete with it. For THAT purpose it excelled (and still does). Doesn't mean there aren't ways to take one and make it better, but these sorts of improvements come at a cost, and at some point "improvement" is subjective.

    Back to the original poster, if you want a "nostalgia" 1911, the "answer" is buy an older Colt. Build quality on them is excellent, they're collectible, and price on these only goes in one direction. . up. Even beat-up used ones still appreciate in value. Colt still exists (for now) and its still putting out 1911s, but its effectively only putting out expensive "boutique" ones. IMO, those aren't worth it.

    If you just want a "shooter" fire/abuse at the range, and/or just to see if you like the 1911 platform, Rock Island Armory mades inexpensive but still good quality guns to GI spec. They're made in the Philippines, but the company uses forged parts, and its been making 1911s for over 50 years. IIRC, they actually make more 1911s than any other company, and they've made them for multiple other companies over the years. Obviously, these aren't "Gold Cups", and they're not going to have the appreciation potential, but they cost maybe 1/3 as much and work fine. You can also customize them to your hearts content relatively inexpensively.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think the Gold Cups still needed work to be all they could be.
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    MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,987 ******
    edited November -1
    "I think the Gold Cups still needed work to be all they could be."...........true, but a whole lot less work than anything else out there. Probably the best 1911 type 'right out of the box'.
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    machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    Everybody has already said it, and said it well. The 'best' 1911 depends on the application. For a match gun, the best one is entirely different from a combat gun. 'Brag factor' guns are a third category, often pretending to be both match guns and combat guns, mutually exclusive characteristics which result in an abomination which won't do anything well (except look impressive to little kids and old ladies, LOL).

    The Philippinos, Brazilians, and Turks all make respectable iron in the form of service-type 1911's, if you find a Colt or Gov't-contracted Saipan-stormer type 1911 too pricey. For match guns, there are a number of custom builders, but any of them will also be expensive.
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