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Can anyone I.D. this cylinder?

buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
edited May 2015 in Ask the Experts
I am trying to find out what revolver this cylinder is made for. It is a 7-shot .22lr. It has no markings on it. Any help would be very appreciated.
Thank you!
Old Gun Guy
000_4100_zpsa7f726fd.jpg
000_4105_zps08ade912.jpg
000_4108_zps80786179.jpg

Comments

  • buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello!
    Can anyone I.D. this cylinder. It is marked "455" on the rear face, and the rear chamber diameter is .4795". Is it a 455 Webley, and what revolver would it fit?
    Thank you!
    buttplate
    000_4811_zpsiyohdpcu.jpg
    000_4814_zps6utshx5d.jpg
    000_4816_zps9zh4i1uc.jpg
    000_4817_zpscn7sksd6.jpg
  • buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Can anyone I.D. this cylinder? It is a 6-shot .22 LR. It has a groove that appears that the cylinder stop rides in it continuously. Any help would be appreciated.
    Thank you!
    buttplate
    000_5253_zpsv1l9iamn.jpg
    000_5255_zpsboac8h4h.jpg
    000_5257_zpstg5o2sxw.jpg
  • buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello!
    I have a cylinder that has a British and a German proof mark on it, plus an inspector's stamp on the face. Can anyone tell me what type of revolver that this cylinder fits?
    Thank You!
    buttplate
    000_5174_zpsnhqtpzvc.jpg
    000_5184_zpsqhtdyipu.jpg
    000_5185_zps9qcv1sdy.jpg
    000_5189_zps99vhtxsc.jpg
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    What the heck do you do to get your pictures all the way to he right [?] They should be his way [:0]

    ek8bhLu.jpg
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    He needs to left click on the "direct" box of the share links after clicking on the pic in the album. Then come here use the 4th from right icon, put the curser in between the curser in here then right click then select paste, followed by hitting enter.

    added if you click on the link in this thread http://forums.GunBroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=653842

    it goes to a photobucket page. Left click on either the "Direct" box or the box to the right it will auto copy the address so that you can paste it in between the generated using the 4th icon.  Left click on 4th from right icon.  Place cursor in between theleft click to set it there, then right click, click on paste.capandball%20002.jpg
  • buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gentlemen,
    I have followed your instructions to the letter on how to post pictures. This is the only website that I've ever had a problem posting pics. I use Photobucket, I left-click on the "direct" option, hit your "insert image" icon, put the cursor between the 2 [img][/img], and paste.
    When I go to preview the pictures,they are not there. The only way I can get pics posted to this website is to left click on "image" on Photobucket and then follow your instructions as above. The pictures will be displayed, but always all the way to the right.
    What am I doing wrong?[?][?]
    Thanks!
    buttplate
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,705 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by buttplate
    Gentlemen,
    I have followed your instructions to the letter on how to post pictures. This is the only website that I've ever had a problem posting pics. I use Photobucket, I left-click on the "direct" option, hit your "insert image" icon, put the cursor between the 2 [img][/img], and paste.
    When I go to preview the pictures,they are not there. The only way I can get pics posted to this website is to left click on "image" on Photobucket and then follow your instructions as above. The pictures will be displayed, but always all the way to the right.
    What am I doing wrong?[?][?]
    Thanks!
    buttplate

    You're posting both the URL address and the image, pushing the image off to the right. Don't use the URL icon_editor_url.gif link. Just use the image icon icon_editor_image.gif and paste the image location between the brackets.

    Open the image icon and paste this between the brackets:
    http://i605.photobucket.com/albums/tt133/slummutt65/000_5253_zpsv1l9iamn.jpg

    This will be the result:

    000_5253_zpsv1l9iamn.jpg
  • fideaufideau Member Posts: 11,887 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    So what does this fit? Never saw one like that so I don't know.
  • buttplatebuttplate Member Posts: 234 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by fideau
    So what does this fit? Never saw one like that so I don't know.


    Jim,
    I don't have a clue what it fits. That's why I posted the question.
    buttplate
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Went through my references couldn't find anything similar. The approach cut, to the bolt locking notch. Is very unique. It almost appears, as it was deliberately machined to be a cam surface? Don't recall, running into anything similar in the past?
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    Webley automatic revolvers had something similar. Also there was another revolver whose name eludes me where the cylinder was forced to the forcing cone of the barrel to form a seal and prevent loss of gas through the cylindder gap.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rsnyder55
    Webley automatic revolvers had something similar. Also there was another revolver whose name eludes me where the cylinder was forced to the forcing cone of the barrel to form a seal and prevent loss of gas through the cylindder gap.



    It's the Russian Nagant military revolver, your thinking of. It functions differently though. Has a cam that forces the cylinder forward, as the hammer is coming to full cock.

    All modern revolvers, use what is called a "hand" to actuate the cylinder. Rather than a cam surface machined in the cylinder. That uses the bolt mechanism riding in the cam surface. To index the cylinder.

    That why the OP's cylinder is so unusual. It seems to be from a recently made .22 revolver. But the cam type mechanism, went out of use many years ago?
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