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Reblueing values, don't get it?

asopasop Member Posts: 8,928 ✭✭✭✭
edited October 2015 in Ask the Experts
So if an old quality firearm has been reblued it's considered a "shooter". I certainly understand it's not original (and I guess that's the point). But it's still an historic firearm and shouldn't it be valued somewhat more than just a "shooter"?

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    thorhammerthorhammer Member Posts: 959 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The blue book lists the value according to original condition, reblueing

    then brings original condition to 0%. I believe that's the benchmark

    to accurately describe remaining original condition.

    Years ago I restored an old Steven's 410 O/U. Had the barrel reblued,

    the receiver case hardened and I fitted walnut stocks on. My value

    at the Cabela's blue book desk was zero percent original condition and

    he could only give me $125.00 for it. I declined and was a good

    lesson in not restoring older firearms as a way to increase it's

    value.
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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    There is a big difference between reblue and restore. There are some high end Shops that restore collector type Fire-Arms Doug Turnbull is one such guns that are restored DO have value some in the thousands of $$ but the restoration to that level will cost you that much and so you still have a nicer looking fire-arm but money in your pocket when you sell AFTER you had it worked on is a wash
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    To start off with there are only two collectable names in valuable/investment gun collecting. Those two names are Colt, and Winchester.

    While the Blue Book is kind of a standard starting point reference book, those conditions listed are mostly in accordance with NRA graded condition, as the gun left the factory original condition.

    When it comes to metal finishing, there are some that can closely mimic the factory finishes, but a hard core collector, will be able to tell the difference 95% of the time. That originality is as it came from the factory, not as close as it can possibly look as it was, when it came from the factory.

    Just like vintage car collecting. If there are two identical show room looking, 1956 Ford Thunderbirds, and one is all original, and the other is a frame off restoration, which one is the rarest of the two and worth more money? The one that still has all of its original factory finish. Same applies to vintage firearms.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    "To start off with there are only two collectable names in valuable/investment gun collecting. Those two names are Colt, and Winchester."





    Don't mean to troll, or starting a pissing contest. But I don't agree with the quoted statement.
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    Ricci WrightRicci Wright Member Posts: 8,260 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    "To start off with there are only two collectable names in valuable/investment gun collecting. Those two names are Colt, and Winchester."





    Don't mean to troll, or starting a pissing contest. But I don't agree with the quoted statement.
    . Agree with you 100%. That's leaving out good S&W revolvers, military firearms, good shotguns etc. all of which can be excellent investments. In fact one could argue that Colts are over priced to a point that they may no longer be the best investment in the gun world.
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    MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,987 ******
    edited November -1
    value for a re-blued (if well done) older 'collectable' will be more than a 0% original, but the 'line' crosses at about 10 or 20% original finish. a good looking rebuilt will bring more than a craped out all original. The rebuilt shotgun above would do well at auction, not so much at a gun shop looking to resell.
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by asop
    So if an old quality firearm has been reblued it's considered a "shooter". I certainly understand it's not original (and I guess that's the point). But it's still an historic firearm and shouldn't it be valued somewhat more than just a "shooter"?

    I don't know where you got this idea, but its false.

    The fact is that any modification of a gun away from its ORIGINAL condition, tends to decrease value to collectors.

    That includes rebluing.

    This absolutely does NOT mean a reblued gun has NO collectors value. . .just in MOST cases, it will have LESS collectors value than it would have had if it were not reblued.

    EG, an original 19th century colt with 65% original finish is probably going to be worth more than the same gun with a 100% RE-finish.

    As already mentioned, there are also cases where a good restoration (including refinish) can increase the value of a gun. . .even significantly. The issue there is that *usually* the cost of the restoration exceeds the increase in value provided by the restoration. IE, unless you can do it yourself on the cheap (which, bluntly, you probably can't) you're probably NOT going to be able to make money buying old guns, refinishing, then re-selling them.

    quote:there are only two collectable names in valuable/investment gun collecting. Those two names are Colt, and Winchester
    I also disagree with this. Mauser rifles and Luger pistols aren't collectible?

    While certainly the above two are among the most collectible, full auto guns (of all sorts of makes) have been absolutely stellar investments.

    Old Smiths are collectible, as are Remingtons and Marlins. Pretty much any gun that's seen military use in any "name" conflict is going to be collectible at some point, though in many (probably most) cases, it may take decades for it to happen.

    This is getting off track, but right now we've hit the point where most of the longarms used in actual warfare are select fire guns that aren't legally ownable by American civilians. So unless something changes with respect to the law, I think that leaves handguns as the most readily accessible future military type collectible.
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    Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There are most certainly more than just Colts and Winchesters that are highly collectable; Ballard, Remington, S&W, Ithaca, Parker Brothers, L.C. Smith, Sharps, just to name a few.

    All collectable makes and models will suffer greatly if they are refinished, reblued, reworks, etc. The typical value loss is a minimum of 50%, and it can be much higher for specific specimens.
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,062 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A Turnbull "restore" will cost you several orders of magnitude more than you will ever recover in reselling the item. It may be a pretty shooter, but it is not original.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I vote for shooter's. I also like daily driver's as on Jay Leno's Garage. If I ever get a Ferrari or a Porsche I'll be driving it.
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