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some Weatherby 22 help please....

toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
edited April 2017 in Ask the Experts
I tried this awhile back and didn't get a response, but I thought that I'd give it 1 more try. I have a Weatherby XXII, and the trigger pull is horrendous. It has a bunch of travel and creep, but the pull weight is about 2 pounds. It's difficult for most people to shoot since they don't realize when the trigger is getting ready to break. I've looked for another trigger but have not had any luck. Any thoughts to a remedy for this? Thanks.

Comments

  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    A good full service gunsmith should be able to handle that if you can throw enough $$ at him. With insurance, and liability, you might not find one willing to tackle that. I am sure some geometry will have to be changed to take out the creep and sear engagement...but it needs to remain safe, so you might get most of that out, but not all of it.
  • pip5255pip5255 Member Posts: 1,614 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    is this a newer model with an adjustment screw just in front of trigger ? if so that is to make adjustments.
    just because you could doesn't mean you should
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Older one, no adjustment screw. Tim, I don't want to throw a pile of $$ at it, but would like to make it a little more friendly to shoot. Since I posted this, I put a trigger gauge on it and it consistently trips at 1.75#. A little light for a semi auto plinker 22....[B)]
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Perhaps Bubba already got to it and replacing a few parts would fix it - a 2# trigger on an autoloader doesn't sound factory.

    Looking at the crappy schematic online isn't helpful. But looking down the list I see a not illustrated part "sear engagement screw"

    +1 for a real gunsmith not a gun assembler.

    http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/Weatherby-33563/MKXXIITubeMagazine-42554.htm?results=All

    I'm betting it's not all milled steel construction. But if it is it would be worth fixing.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by toad67
    Older one, no adjustment screw. Tim, I don't want to throw a pile of $$ at it, but would like to make it a little more friendly to shoot. Since I posted this, I put a trigger gauge on it and it consistently trips at 1.75#. A little light for a semi auto plinker 22....[B)]



    I don't know, if you bought it new or not? Or how old it is? As I recall, 2 or 3 manufacturers, made that 22 for Weatherby. Beretta being the first.

    But I agree with Charlie, it never left the factory with a 1 3/4 lb trigger pull.

    Contact customer service at Weatherby. Legal liability, with all the bottom feeding lawyers. Is a nightmare for firearms manufacturers nowadays. They might offer to replace it with a new .22? Or have the trigger fixed on their dime.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    quote:Originally posted by toad67
    Older one, no adjustment screw. Tim, I don't want to throw a pile of $$ at it, but would like to make it a little more friendly to shoot. Since I posted this, I put a trigger gauge on it and it consistently trips at 1.75#. A little light for a semi auto plinker 22....[B)]



    I don't know, if you bought it new or not? Or how old it is? As I recall, 2 or 3 manufacturers, made that 22 for Weatherby. Beretta being the first.

    But I agree with Charlie, it never left the factory with a 1 3/4 lb trigger pull.

    Contact customer service at Weatherby. Legal liability, with all the bottom feeding lawyers. Is a nightmare for firearms manufacturers nowadays. They might offer to replace it with a new .22? Or have the trigger fixed on their dime.


    I bought it used from my LGS awhile back. IIRC it was a mid 70's DOM. It has really been a weird ride on this gun. It was for sale at my LGS, and the original owner had passed away and was for sale as a consignment gun. The original owner had engraved his name and D/L number in the receiver and the scope, which happened to be a Leupold VXII 3-9. Other than the engraving, the gun is absolutely in mint condition. I ended up getting it for, IIRC, $400 or so OTD. I contacted Leupold to see if they could replace the main tube so that I could eliminate the engraving. Come to find out it was old enough that they no longer made, or had parts for that scope. Since they couldn't repair it, and gloss scopes are no longer made, I got a brand new 3-9 gloss from the custom shop for free. Now I have a beautiful Weatherby with a really unsafe, IMO, trigger. When you pull it you really need to pay attention to where the muzzle is, and it's not really what I like in a semi auto plinker 22. And FWIW, it don't shoot all that great....If I can't find a trigger remedy I'm guessing we'll be separating ways...
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,317 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A 1.75 lb trigger unsafe?
    Does it double or run completely away?
    The Ruger plumbers will put a hair trigger like that on their guns at the drop of a hat.

    My XXII is light but not that light and the trigger stop screw I had put through the guard makes it very shootable.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by toad67
    Older one, no adjustment screw. Tim, I don't want to throw a pile of $$ at it, but would like to make it a little more friendly to shoot. Since I posted this, I put a trigger gauge on it and it consistently trips at 1.75#. A little light for a semi auto plinker 22....[B)]


    Somebody changed a spring along the way too. I stand by my first statement. A good Gunsmith, not gun seller, who is willing to do the job, can make this into a masterpiece. It takes a little understanding of physics, geometry, and a good set of machinist stones.
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