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Need an ID

Ruger4meRuger4me Member, Moderator Posts: 3,426 ******
edited January 2016 in Ask the Experts
Hello Guys, I've been reading your forum for a couple of years but never had any questions until now. I inherited a couple of rifles from my step dad recently and one is a Marlin Mod. 336 which I'm fairly familiar with, but the other doesn't have much markings on it....it is a 30.06 (marked on barrel) and there is some sort of proof mark but my old eyes can't see it very well and there may be more under the scope. I took these picture and hope that you folks can tell me what it is. I don't see a serial number anywhere either... Thanks,
Bret
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Comments

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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think your rifle was originally a United States Rifle, cal .30, Model of 1917. It has been heavily sporterized. The US Ordnance mark is the "burning bomb" stamped on the bolt handle.

    Not to throw cold water on you, but would not be comfortable with a rifle that has had the SN removed. And yes, they had serial numbers. Stamped on top of the chamber area.

    Picture of one that has not been sporterized- http://www.dandbmilitaria.com/images/D/DSC00149-01.jpg

    EDIT I apologize- looking at the wrong place- your rifle DOES have a serial number- can just make it out peeping from under the forward part of the scope mount.
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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    ENFIELD I think model 1917 as you cansee you need to resize smaller all pictures
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It appears to be a Mauser type action, on possibly a military rifle, that definitely BUBBA got his hands on...not pretty.
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    Ruger4meRuger4me Member, Moderator Posts: 3,426 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    ENFIELD I think model 1917 as you cansee you need to resize smaller all pictures


    How do I resize the pics? Select edit on original post?
    Sorry they are so big.
    Bret
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    navc130navc130 Member Posts: 1,216 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    U.S. Model 1917 Enfield. Well worn, it could have been used in France in 1917. The serial number is under the scope mount.
    Most likely OK to shoot, but it's always a safe idea to know the headspace is OK. However, what is the condition of the bore? I have seen those bores so corroded from corrosive ammo that they would not be safe to shoot (I mean like a sewer pipe).
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    Ruger4meRuger4me Member, Moderator Posts: 3,426 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by navc130
    U.S. Model 1917 Enfield. Well worn, it could have been used in France in 1917. The serial number is under the scope mount.


    Thanks for all the replies Guys, I knew it was older and pretty beat up, but I didn't want to try and take it apart to clean it up without knowing what it was first. I don't plan on selling it as it is reminder of a lost family member, but I'd like to be able to shoot it as I enjoy shooting all the guns I have. Do you think I need to have a smith check it out? It appears to function correctly.
    Bret
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,041 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If there is no serial number, you have a legality problem.
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    MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,986 ******
    edited November -1
    you can see the serial number 'peeking' out from underneath the front scope mount, the makers name is there also (either Remington, Winchester, or Eddystone). As others has noted this is (was) a sporterised (badly) 1917 enfield.
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    Ruger4meRuger4me Member, Moderator Posts: 3,426 ******
    edited November -1
    Hello Guys, just an update fyi, I finally removed the scope and it is what you said a US Model 1917 made by Winchester and by serial number in march of 1918. Thanks again for your responses.
    Bret
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    topdadtopdad Member Posts: 3,408 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I know it just kills military arms collectors,but there's something very cool about those old sporterized rifles. Something that was most
    likely bought out of a 55 gal drum for 15, or 20 dollars, and made into a huntin rifle that probably was a deer killin machine. Probably
    someone that could not afford the 100 bucks a store bought huntin
    rifle would cost. Beauty is most definitely in the eye of the beholder.
    Get the headspacing checked out, and you might still have a deer killin machine. As well as a piece of family history. I think you have a very cool rifle, kind of like a rat rod, rather than a fully restored classic. Good Luck[;)]
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    Ruger4meRuger4me Member, Moderator Posts: 3,426 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by topdad
    I know it just kills military arms collectors,but there's something very cool about those old sporterized rifles. Something that was most
    likely bought out of a 55 gal drum for 15, or 20 dollars, and made into a huntin rifle that probably was a deer killin machine. Probably
    someone that could not afford the 100 bucks a store bought huntin
    rifle would cost. Beauty is most definitely in the eye of the beholder.
    Get the headspacing checked out, and you might still have a deer killin machine. As well as a piece of family history. I think you have a very cool rifle, kind of like a rat rod, rather than a fully restored classic. Good Luck[;)]


    Thanks, yes I do believe he used it for deer, I'm going to have it checked out by my local smith and if OK, I'll shoot it myself. Always liked rat rods too! Of course I can appreciate a classic...miss my 67 mustang from HS...
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